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I've done some searching on setting up an SVN repository but I'm still a bit confused how everything works at a fundamental level. I understand that one typically has the SVN server, a staging server, and the production server.

I have a computer I want to use to host an SVN repository. It's a PC running Ubuntu. For the time being, we're going to go without a staging server.

Here are my questions:

  • Once the SVN Server is set up, can this be viewed locally in my browser (at localhost of course) or would I need to deploy it to another server first? I'd like to be able to make small code changes, save, and view, all on the SVN.
  • I want to deploy to my shared hosting account. Is there a line of code you use in the CLI to deploy, or is this a script I would need to write myself?
  • How would I set this up to be accessible remotely? A VPN?

Also, I should mention I bought Versions for Mac. I assume there are some shortcuts to these questions in having that app at my disposal.

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1 Answer 1

I'd recommend reading the first two chapters of the svnbook to help you get an idea of what svn can and can't do for you.

  • Once the SVN Server is set up, can this be viewed locally in my browser (at localhost of course) or would I need to deploy it to another server first? I'd like to be able to make small code changes, save, and view, all on the SVN.

If you have a webserver configured on your local machine, you could deploy it there and view your changes. You're basically using your local machine as the staging server. But, svn cannot serve your project for you.

  • I want to deploy to my shared hosting account. Is there a line of code you use in the CLI to deploy, or is this a script I would need to write myself?

This is a script you'll need to write yourself.

  • How would I set this up to be accessible remotely? A VPN?

It sounds like the machine hosting your svn repository is on your LAN, so yes, a VPN would be required to access local resources remotely. If you hosted the repository somewhere else, it would be easier. See this section of the svnbook for more information.

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Excellent. I think the SVN book is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for your responses, I've been really lost over this. –  ajkochanowicz Dec 6 '11 at 14:26

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