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I'm trying to track down a freeze problem with an app I am developing. I may be in the deep end of the NSAutoreleasePool and am screwing things up.

The app is playing a midi file. If I comment out the "simRespondToFileNote" code below that uses an NSAutoreleasePool it doesn't freeze. If I let the code run, it will freeze at seemingly random points The crash log/console output doesn't seem to indicate where the issue is occurring.

Here is the program flow:

  1. I'm using the Bass midi lib (C lib); it plays the midi file in its own thread.

  2. When a midi event occurs, a callback is triggered and I wrap the midi event data in an NSDictionary and route it to the main thread so I can do UI updates and some other stuff.

Here is the code that does the routing:

- (void)forwardFileNoteIn:(int) note withVelocity: (int) velocity
{
int position = BASS_ChannelGetPosition(midiFileStream, BASS_POS_MIDI_TICK);
float percent = ((float)position / (float)totalTicks);
int ticksInLoop = outLoopTick - inLoopTick;

QWORD bytes=BASS_ChannelGetPosition(midiFileStream, BASS_POS_BYTE); // get position in bytes
double seconds=BASS_ChannelBytes2Seconds(midiFileStream, bytes); // translate to seconds
int timeStamp =seconds*1000; // translate to milliseconds

NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
NSDictionary *midiData = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                           @"fileNoteIn", @"eventType",
                          [NSNumber numberWithInt:note], @"note",
                          [NSNumber numberWithInt:velocity],@"velocity",
                          [NSNumber numberWithInt:timeStamp],@"timeStamp",
                          [NSNumber numberWithInt:position],@"position",
                          [NSNumber numberWithFloat:percent],@"percentPlayed",
                          [NSNumber numberWithInt:ticksInLoop],@"ticksInLoop",
                          nil];

[delegate performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(midiFileEvent:)
                            withObject:midiData
                            waitUntilDone:NO];
[pool release];

}

  1. From the delegate a message is sent to another object using the NSDictionary instance as a param. That object either sends the NSDictionary instance immediately to another object or queues it to be sent after a short delay (using performSelector: afterDelay: ).

Is it possible that the NSAutoreleasePool is deleting the NSDictionary instance before the queued message is triggered? I am not draining the pool anywhere - should I be doing that?

- (void)simRespondToFileNote:(NSDictionary *)dictionary
{
int velocity = [[dictionary objectForKey:@"velocity"] intValue];

if (velocity == 0){
    // noteOff - send it through
    [delegate routeUserSimMidiEvent:dictionary];
} else {

    float totalPercentCorrect = [dataSource getUserCorrectPercent];

    int note = [[dictionary objectForKey:@"note"] intValue];

    if (totalPercentCorrect < _userAccuracy){

        float lateNoteOnTimeDelay =  (dataSource.postTimeHighAccuracy - (dataSource.postTimeHighAccuracy /4)) / 1000.;
        float lateNoteOffTimeDelay = lateNoteOnTimeDelay + .1; // revise

        NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

        // create noteOff data w/ velocity == 0; timeStamp == 0;
        NSDictionary *midiData = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                  [NSNumber numberWithInt:note], @"note",
                                  [NSNumber numberWithInt:0],@"velocity",
                                  [NSNumber numberWithUnsignedInt:0],@"timeStamp",
                                  nil];

        [self performSelector:@selector(simLateResponseToFileNote:)  withObject:dictionary afterDelay: lateNoteOnTimeDelay];
        [self performSelector:@selector(simLateResponseToFileNote:)  withObject:midiData afterDelay: lateNoteOffTimeDelay];
        [pool release];

    } else {

        float lateNoteOnTimeDelay =  (dataSource.postTimeLowAccuracy + (dataSource.postTimeLowAccuracy /4)) / 1000.0;
        float lateNoteOffTimeDelay = lateNoteOnTimeDelay + .1; // revise
         NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

        // create noteOff data w/ velocity == 0; timeStamp == 0;
        NSDictionary *midiData =[NSDictionary dictionaryWithObjectsAndKeys:
                                 [NSNumber numberWithInt:note], @"note",
                                 [NSNumber numberWithInt:0],@"velocity",
                                 nil];

        // queue late noteOn
        [self performSelector:@selector(simLateResponseToFileNote:)  withObject:dictionary afterDelay: lateNoteOnTimeDelay];
        // queue late noteOff
        [self performSelector:@selector(simLateResponseToFileNote:)  withObject:midiData afterDelay: lateNoteOffTimeDelay];
        [pool release];

    }
}

}

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your creation of a temporary autorelease pool in simRespondToFileNote: isn't very useful, but shouldn't be a problem. Your call to performSelector:withObject:afterDelay: will retain dictionary until its called. If forwardFileNoteIn:withVelocity: is on a thread that doesn't have an autorelease pool yet, you may have to create it, but generally you do that at the top of the method. If this thread already has a pool, there's no reason to create on here.

From your description, I would suspect that simLateResponseToFileNote: is blocking the main thread too long. I would look there for a bottleneck.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I took out the autorelease pool in 'simRespondToFileNote:' and now understand how that was redundant. Still getting the freeze though. I'm wondering if I am causing (don't know the correct term here) too large a stack (?) by reusing the original dictionary (from 'forwardFileNoteIn:') since I pass that as an arg through multiple method calls. – Will Tower Dec 6 '11 at 16:43
    
Passing a dictionary is extremely cheap. ObjC allocates all objects on the heap and only passes pointers. So it's not the passing of the dictionary. I would run this through Instruments and see what's hitting the CPU during the hang. – Rob Napier Dec 20 '11 at 17:18
    
thanks. Dictionaries seemed the way to go - glad that it is not an expensive approach. Is there a way to determine how much memory a particular dictionary uses: - like adding up the mem usage of the entries plus ??? for dictionary overhead? I have run my project through Instruments - memory, allocations, zombies, etc. I'm not seeing any leaks or issues that seemed a problem (I might not know what constitutes an issue .. ;-) – Will Tower Dec 26 '11 at 16:44
    
You can try using malloc_size() to check the allocated memory for the NSDictionary struct itself (but that doesn't include the contained objects). But this doesn't seem relevant to freezing. You should look at what your program is doing while it's hung. You can always pause the program and look at what the main thread is blocked on. – Rob Napier Dec 26 '11 at 22:31

You're creating your midiData object into an autorelease pool, doing a delayed performSelector using midiData as a parameter, then draining the pool. Do you not see a problem here?

(Releasing an autorelease pool is equivalent to draining it. (Read the documentation.))

share|improve this answer
1  
performSelector will retain the passed object and receiver. – Chris Wagner Dec 5 '11 at 22:31
    
thanks. Yes, I get that now. – Will Tower Dec 6 '11 at 16:43

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