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Changed completely due to suggestions from other member. Most problems solved, still having problems. Now won't output any names from the array in main. Not sure if I'm passing them back correctly from function.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

void bubblesort(string[], const int);
int sub = 0;

int main()
{
const int maxsize = 100;
string friendArray[maxsize];

ifstream friends;
friends.open("myFriends.dat");

while (sub < maxsize)
 {
  getline(friends, friendArray[sub]);
  sub++;
 }

 bubblesort(friendArray, maxsize);


 cout<<friendArray[0]<<" "<<friendArray[1]<<" "<<friendArray[2];

 system("pause");
 return 0;
}



void bubblesort(string *array, const int size)
{
    bool swap;
    string temp;

    do
    {
        swap = false;
        for (int count = 1; count < (size - 1); count++)
        {
            if(array[count-1] >array[count])
            {
                temp = array[count-1];
                array[count-1] = array[count];
                array[count] = temp;
                swap = true;
            }
        }
    }
    while(swap);

}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your problem isn't necessarily that temp inside bubblesort is not a char, the problem is that array is declared as a string and not a string[].

The reason you're getting the error is because array[count+1] is of type char, and temp is of type string. std::swap expects two elements of the same type.

However, that may be the least of your problems, your code doesn't compile for quite a few reasons. Not just that but you're passing in maxsize to bubblesort at each iteration. There's a flaw in both your logic and your syntax.

EDIT: Since you're still having trouble getting the sorting to work, here's a working modification of your code:

#include <iostream>

void bubblesort(std::string array[], size_t size)
{
  bool bSwapped;
  std::string temp;

   do
   {
      bSwapped = false;
      for (size_t count = 1; count < size; count++)
      {
         if(array[count-1] > array[count])
         {
            std::swap(array[count-1], array[count]);
            bSwapped = true;
         }
      }
   }
   while(bSwapped);
}

int main(void)
{
   std::string array[] = { "def", "ghk", "abc", "world", "hello" };

   bubblesort(array, sizeof(array)/sizeof(*array));

   for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(array)/sizeof(*array); ++i)
      std::cout << array[i] + " ";

   std::cout << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

bubblesort could also be written as: void bubblesort(std::string *array, size_t size). There's no difference in this case since, when passed to a function, arrays decay into pointers.

Since arrays are passed by reference, a pointer to the first element, any modifications made to array inside of bubblesort will actually be modifying your array in main. So that's how arrays are "returned".

std::vector is a good alternative to the standard array, since it automatically resizes and obviously contains the length of the internal array so that you don't have to pass the size everywhere you pass an std::vector. You can also use it the same way as a regular array.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I've come to realize, now I have access violations –  sircrisp Dec 5 '11 at 22:49
1  
@sircrisp: Have you checked the pseudocode at the bubblesort Wikipedia page? –  AusCBloke Dec 5 '11 at 23:09
1  
@sircrisp: Read the couple of lines I just added. Arrays are passed by reference, therefore making any changes to the array in bubblesort is actually making the changes to the array in main. There's no need for an explicit return. Run the program above and you'll see. –  AusCBloke Dec 5 '11 at 23:24
1  
@sircrisp: Not all variables are passed by reference; if you pass a pointer to a variable it'll be passed by reference. The name of an array is the address of it's first element, which turns into a pointer when passed to a function. size_t size is not passed by reference, it's not a pointer or a "reference" that uses the & operator. –  AusCBloke Dec 5 '11 at 23:30
1  
@sircrisp: Your code above is outputting what you're telling it to. You're telling it there are 100 elements, and std::strings are initialized to "". Therefore unless you filled 98+ elements, elements 0-2 are "". Do bubblesort(friendArray, sub)`. –  AusCBloke Dec 5 '11 at 23:45

temp is a string, array[count] is a char (since an std::string is a vector of char elements.) I'm not sure what you're trying to do here, but the compiler is correct - you can't assign a char to a string.

You could change temp to be a char, since all you do with it is assign a char to it, and then assign it back to an element of array, which is also a char.

share|improve this answer
    
Main reads in names from a file into an array. The function is supposed to sort the names. That's what I am trying to do. –  sircrisp Dec 5 '11 at 22:27
1  
When you index into a string you are getting/setting a char, not a string. You should pass a vector<string>& to your function, not a string (that is unfortunately named array). –  Ed S. Dec 5 '11 at 22:31
2  
Your code doesn't do what you think it should do. The bubblesort() function sorts the characters in a single string alphabetically, for one thing. –  Ori Pessach Dec 5 '11 at 22:32

You need to declare temp as char. You can use std::swap to avoid such mistakes in the future:

std::swap(array[count], array[count+1]);

This would make your code compile, but it would not do what you're trying to do (bubblesort). The problem is that you are passing a single string (which is also an "array" of characters) instead of an array of strings, which is, in a very lose sense, "an array of arrays of characters". Your bubblesort needs to accept string *array as its first parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't yet discovered how to use std:: so I'm not sure what that code would do. The sort function is supposed to sort the names read in to the array passed from main. That's what I am trying to do. –  sircrisp Dec 5 '11 at 22:29
    
If array[count] is a char. Where did the names in arrays elements go? –  sircrisp Dec 5 '11 at 22:33
1  
@sircrisp yet you are using std quite successfully: string is a shorthand for std::string :-) Don't get discouraged, your code is close to working. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 5 '11 at 22:35
1  
@sircrisp I updated the answer to explain where did the rest of the elements go (short answer: you did not pass them to bubblesort). –  dasblinkenlight Dec 5 '11 at 22:36
    
I am very appreciative for the advice but I still don't seem to be getting it... What difference does adding * to the beginning of array make? When I was taught about passing parameters to functions it was only with integers so I'm trying to learn out of a book but it doesn't have any examples with arrays and strings either. –  sircrisp Dec 5 '11 at 22:38

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