Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this code will good for n<20, but for n=40 give me access violation error: this code will fill X and O random.

 int i=0,j=0;
 int x=0,y=0;
 int n=40;
 for(i=0;i<n;i++)
 {
     for(j=0;j<n;j++)
         arr[i][j]='O';
 }

 srand(clock());
 for(i=0;i<n*n;i++)
 {
   x = rand()%n;
   y = rand()%n;
   if(arr[x][y] == 'O') arr[x][y]='X';
 }

Declare:

 arr = (char**)malloc(n);
 for(i=0;i<n;i++)
    arr[i] = (char*)malloc(n);
share|improve this question
    
Why not just randomly set the value to X or O in the first loop? –  CanSpice Dec 5 '11 at 22:55
3  
Can we see your arr declaration too? –  Drahakar Dec 5 '11 at 22:56
    
Man I hate 2D array malloc. I never get it right. My guess is that there's nothing that forces malloc above to keep memory contiguous so it will randomly fail. –  Michael Dorgan Dec 5 '11 at 23:05
    
you can use memory from stack if the array will be small, it's a lot easier. –  KCH Dec 5 '11 at 23:06
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

change

arr = (char**)malloc(n);

to

arr = (char**)malloc(n*sizeof(char*));
share|improve this answer
add comment

you could do :-

 for(i=0;i<n;i++)
     {
         for(j=0;j<n;j++)
             arr[i][j]= ((rand() % 2) == 0) ? 'O' : 'X';
     }

and make sure your array is n by n. Instead of those multiple mallocs, which will allocate memory from all over the place...

 arr = (char**)malloc( n * n * sizeof(char));
share|improve this answer
add comment
for(i=0;i<n*n;i++)
{
   x = rand()%n;
   y = rand()%n;
   if(arr[x][y] == 'O') arr[x][y]='X';
   ...

n*n? arr only has n elements and arr[0...n-1] each only have n elements. If x or y is >= n, you'll be accessing elements past the end of your array and causing undefined behaviour. In this case your lucky because it causes an access violation.

That, and arr = (char**)malloc(n); should be arr = (char**)malloc(n * sizeof(char*));.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If n is constant, or your compiler supports C99, you can initalize it as a 1-d, then cast it to a pointer-to array:

int i;
char (*arr)[n] = malloc(n*n);
char *vals = (char*)arr;

for(i=0; i<n*n; i++)
   vals[i] = (rand()%2)?'X':'O';

//now, use arr[y][x] as usual
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.