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I have a 20000 x 185 x 5 tensor, which looks like

{{{a1_1,a2_1,a3_1,a4_1,a5_1},{b1_1,b2_1,b3_1,b4_1,b5_1}... 
(continue for 185 times)}
 {{a1_2,a2_2,a3_2,a4_2,a5_2},{b1_2,b2_2,b3_2,b4_2,b5_2}...

 ...    
 ... 
 ...

{{a1_20000,a2_20000,a3_20000,a4_20000,a5_20000},
{b1_20000,b2_20000,b3_20000,b4_20000,b5_20000}... }}

The 20000 represents iteration number, the 185 represents individuals, and each individual has 5 attributes. I need to construct a 185 x 5 matrix that stores the mean value for each individual's 5 attributes, averaged across the 20000 iterations.

Not sure what the best way to do this is. I know Mean[ ] works on matrices, but with a Tensor, the derived values might not be what I need. Also, Mathematica ran out of memory if I tried to do Mean[tensor]. Please provide some help or advice. Thank you.

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1  
(1) Format your code. (2) Provide your way of solution which might be not optimal, but we'll improve it. –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:11
    
Thanks for the comments and formatting. I am new to stackoverflow, will format my post more next time. –  user1066225 Dec 6 '11 at 0:45
1  
Are all the elements in your tensor numerical? If not, it could explain why you ran out of memory. 20000 by 185 by 5 is not that big in the Mathematica scheme of things. –  Verbeia Dec 6 '11 at 0:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When in doubt, drop the size of the dimensions. (You can still keep them distinct to easily see where things end up.)

(* In[1]:= *) data = Array[a, {4, 3, 2}]

(* Out[1]= *) {{{a[1, 1, 1], a[1, 1, 2]}, {a[1, 2, 1], 
   a[1, 2, 2]}, {a[1, 3, 1], a[1, 3, 2]}}, {{a[2, 1, 1], 
   a[2, 1, 2]}, {a[2, 2, 1], a[2, 2, 2]}, {a[2, 3, 1], 
   a[2, 3, 2]}}, {{a[3, 1, 1], a[3, 1, 2]}, {a[3, 2, 1], 
   a[3, 2, 2]}, {a[3, 3, 1], a[3, 3, 2]}}, {{a[4, 1, 1], 
   a[4, 1, 2]}, {a[4, 2, 1], a[4, 2, 2]}, {a[4, 3, 1], a[4, 3, 2]}}}

(* In[2]:= *) Dimensions[data]

(* Out[2]= *) {4, 3, 2}

(* In[3]:= *) means = Mean[data]

(* Out[3]= *) {
  {1/4 (a[1, 1, 1] + a[2, 1, 1] + a[3, 1, 1] + a[4, 1, 1]), 
   1/4 (a[1, 1, 2] + a[2, 1, 2] + a[3, 1, 2] + a[4, 1, 2])}, 
  {1/4 (a[1, 2, 1] + a[2, 2, 1] + a[3, 2, 1] + a[4, 2, 1]), 
   1/4 (a[1, 2, 2] + a[2, 2, 2] + a[3, 2, 2] + a[4, 2, 2])}, 
  {1/4 (a[1, 3, 1] + a[2, 3, 1] + a[3, 3, 1] + a[4, 3, 1]), 
   1/4 (a[1, 3, 2] + a[2, 3, 2] + a[3, 3, 2] + a[4, 3, 2])}
  }

(* In[4]:= *) Dimensions[means]

(* Out[4]= *) {3, 2}
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Thanks, Brett. I figured out the Mean[tensor] does the job. Had to reduce the number of iteration in order for my program to run the operation. –  user1066225 Dec 6 '11 at 0:41

Mathematica ran out of memory if I tried to do Mean[tensor]

This is probably because intermediate results are larger than the final result. This is likely if the elements are not type Real or Integer. Example:

a = Tuples[{x, Sqrt[y], z^x, q/2, Mod[r, 1], Sin[s]}, {2, 4}];
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
b = Mean[a];
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
{109125576, 124244808}
{269465456, 376960648}

If they are, and are in packed array form, perhaps the elements are such that the array in unpacked during processing.

Here is an example where the tensor is a packed array of small numbers, and unpacking does not occur.

a = RandomReal[99, {20000, 185, 5}];
PackedArrayQ[a]
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
b = Mean[a];
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
True
{163012808, 163016952}
{163018944, 163026688}

Here is the same size of tensor with very large numbers.

a = RandomReal[$MaxMachineNumber, {20000, 185, 5}];
Developer`PackedArrayQ[a]
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
b = Mean[a];
{MemoryInUse[], MaxMemoryUsed[]}
True
{163010680, 458982088}
{163122608, 786958080}
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To elaborate a little on the other answers, there is no reason to expect Mathematica functions to operate materially differently on tensors than matrices because Mathemetica considers them both to be nested Lists, that are just of different nesting depth. How functions behave with lists depends on whether they're Listable, which you can check using Attributes[f], where fis the function you are interested in.

Your data list's dimensionality isn't actually that big in the scheme of things. Without seeing your actual data it is hard to be sure, but I suspect the reason you are running out of memory is that some of your data is non-numerical.

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I don't know what you're doing incorrectly (your code will help). But Mean[] already works as you want it to.

a = RandomReal[1, {20000, 185, 5}];
b = Mean@a;

Dimensions@b
Out[1]= {185, 5}

You can even check that this is correct:

{Max@b, Min@b}
Out[2]={0.506445, 0.494061}

which is the expected value of the mean given that RandomReal uses a uniform distribution by default.

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Yes, indeed. I tested out on my own earlier, with a small set of data and it worked. –  user1066225 Dec 6 '11 at 0:43

Assume you have the following data :

a = Table[RandomInteger[100], {i, 20000}, {j, 185}, {k, 5}];

In a straightforward manner You can find a table which stores the means of a[[1,j,k]],a[[2,j,k]],...a[[20000,j,k]]:

c = Table[Sum[a[[i, j, k]], {i, Length[a]}], {j, 185}, {k, 5}]/
 Length[a] // N; // Timing
{37.487, Null}

or simply :

d = Total[a]/Length[a] // N; // Timing
{0.702, Null}

The second way is about 50 times faster.

c == d
True
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1  
Yes, but surely Mapping Mean at the appropriate depth on the tensor is more efficient and teaches the user more about effective use of functional programming styles in Mathematica? –  Verbeia Dec 6 '11 at 1:03
1  
At the begining a procedural approach can be convenient as well. –  Artes Dec 6 '11 at 1:15

To extend on Brett's answer a bit, when you call Mean on a n-dimensional tensor then it averages over the first index and returns an n-1 dimensional tensor:

a = RandomReal[1, {a1, a2, a3, ... an}];
Dimensions[a] (* This would have n entries in it *)
b = Mean[a];
Dimensions[b] (* Has n-1 entries, where averaging was done over the first index *)

In the more general case where you may wish to average over the i-th argument, you would have to transpose the data around first. For example, say you want to average the 3nd of 5 dimensions. You would need the 3rd element first, followed by the 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th.

a = RandomReal[1, {5, 10, 2, 40, 10}];
b = Transpose[a, {2, 3, 4, 1, 5}];
c = Mean[b]; (* Now of dimensions {5, 10, 40, 10} *)

In other words, you would make a call to Transpose where you placed the i-th index as the first tensor index and moved everything before it ahead one. Anything that comes after the i-th index stays the same.

This tends to come in handy when your data comes in odd formats where the first index may not always represent different realizations of a data sample. I've had this come up, for example, when I had to do time averaging of large wind data sets where the time series came third (!) in terms of the tensor representation that was available.

You could imagine the generalizedTenorMean would look something like this then:

Clear[generalizedTensorMean];
generalizedTensorMean[A_, i_] := 
 Module[{n = Length@Dimensions@A, ordering},
  ordering = 
   Join[Table[x, {x, 2, i}], {1}, Table[x, {x, i + 1, n}]];
  Mean@Transpose[A, ordering]]

This reduces to the plain-old-mean when i == 1. Try it out:

A = RandomReal[1, {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14}];
Dimensions@A   (* {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14} *)
Dimensions@generalizedTensorMean[A, 1]  (* {4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14} *)
Dimensions@generalizedTensorMean[A, 7]  (* {2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12} *)

On a side note, I'm surprised that Mathematica doesn't support this by default. You don't always want to average over the first level of a list.

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