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I wrote this small C program:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
 FILE * fp;
 fp = fopen("data.txt","w");
 fprintf(fp,"%d",578); 
 return 0;
}

Then I analyzed data.txt using xxd -b. I was expecting that I will see the 32 bit representation of 578 instead I saw the ASCII representation of 578:

xxd -b data.txt
0000000: 00110101 00110111 00111000                             578

Why is that? How do I store the 32 bit representation of 578 (01000010 00000010 00000000 00000000) assuming little endian?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use fwrite:

uint32_t n = 578;
fwrite(&n, sizeof n, 1, fp);

fprintf is for formatted output, whence the trailing f.

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fwrite also has f :) –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:40
2  
@Beginner: that one stands for "file". –  Kerrek SB Dec 6 '11 at 0:40
    
Yes, I know, but from your last sentence it follows it will stand for formatted always, won't it? –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:45
1  
@Beginner: the two functions are fprintf (File Print Formatted) and fwrite (File Write). –  abelenky Dec 6 '11 at 0:50
2  
@Beginner: trailing f. –  jamesdlin Dec 6 '11 at 0:53

That's the meaning of "Formatted". You used qualifier %d which means "format the given value as its ASCII numeric representation in the execution character set, assuming the value is a signed integer".

If you want to write binary data into a file - don't use formatted output. Use fwrite instead to write raw binary data.

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1  
Why does printf change to ASCII? Does the terminal expect ASCII? –  Bruce Dec 6 '11 at 0:44
    
Indeed, C never mentions "ASCII". "In the execution character set" would be a more appropriate description. –  Kerrek SB Dec 6 '11 at 0:49
    
@Bruce: printf always formats its arguments for human consumption. It's not used for writing binary. –  AKX Dec 6 '11 at 0:50
    
Removed the ASCII, it can indeed be whatever character set is set for the console. –  littleadv Dec 6 '11 at 1:56

You'll want to look at fwrite.

int myNum = 578;
fwrite( &myNum, sizeof(int), 1, fp);
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why do you link to a C++ header if tag of the question is C? –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:40
    
Its a good reference, and the same function is available in both C and C++. If you want a "pure" C reference: linux.die.net/man/3/fwrite –  abelenky Dec 6 '11 at 0:45
    
Yes it is, but I think it's confusing. Maybe you better put "pure" C reference in your answer? –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:49
2  
No. I picked the better reference, even if it came from a C++ site. Quit complaining. –  abelenky Dec 6 '11 at 0:51
    
Both links you provided are not references but third party sites. This one is a reference: pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/functions/fwrite.html I'm quit. –  Beginner Dec 6 '11 at 0:54

If you want to write raw data to a file using the standard IO facilities, you're looking for fwrite(3):

$ cat numbers.c
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    int i = 578;
    long l = 578;
    float f = 5.78;
    double d = .578;
    long marker = 0xFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF;


    FILE *fp = fopen("data", "w");
    fwrite(&i, sizeof i, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&marker, sizeof marker, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&l, sizeof l, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&marker, sizeof marker, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&f, sizeof f, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&marker, sizeof marker, 1, fp);
    fwrite(&d, sizeof d, 1, fp);
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}
$ make numbers
cc     numbers.c   -o numbers
$ ./numbers 
$ xxd data
0000000: 4202 0000 ffff ffff ffff ffff 4202 0000  B...........B...
0000010: 0000 0000 ffff ffff ffff ffff c3f5 b840  ...............@
0000020: ffff ffff ffff ffff e5d0 22db f97e e23f  .........."..~.?
$ xxd -b data
0000000: 01000010 00000010 00000000 00000000 11111111 11111111  B.....
0000006: 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111  ......
000000c: 01000010 00000010 00000000 00000000 00000000 00000000  B.....
0000012: 00000000 00000000 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111  ......
0000018: 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11000011 11110101  ......
000001e: 10111000 01000000 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111  .@....
0000024: 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111 11100101 11010000  ......
000002a: 00100010 11011011 11111001 01111110 11100010 00111111  "..~.?
$ 
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