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I am trying to AND two difference binary number. so far that is my code (i posted to pastebin as im not sure i got the layout right on here) http://pastebin.com/FRT6Qig6

My problem is I just dont understand what my answer should be. Or even if my code is doing the right thing.

namespace ConsoleApplication1 {
    class Two {
        public void run() {
            byte a = 255;
            byte b = 85;
            byte c;

            a = Convert.ToByte("10101111", 2);  //85
            b = Convert.ToByte("011111111", 2); //255

            c = (byte) (a & b);

            Console.WriteLine
                ("ANDing two bytes  - decimal:{0:D3}  hex:{0:x2}  binary:{1}",
                 c, Convert.ToString(c, 2));

            //wait until next press
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
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2  
We can't help you until you ask a question. –  StilesCrisis Dec 6 '11 at 0:56
    
What should my answer be? When I AND 255 and 85. Also is that what my code should be doing? –  Alex Dec 6 '11 at 1:00
1  
Do note that 85 should be 1010101, not 10101111. –  sarnold Dec 6 '11 at 1:05
    
@Alex - You need to do some research so you are able to determine the correct answer. You can't expect us help understanding how AND'ing two base 2 numbers. Do you know conditions where X AND Y are True? –  Ramhound Dec 6 '11 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

What should my answer be?

I will go ahead and answer this question

The truth table for A AND B is the following:

A B Value
1 1 1
1 0 0
0 1 0
0 0 0

The truth table for A OR B is the following:

A B Value
1 1 1
1 0 1
0 1 1
0 0 0

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Because all the bits in a byte are turned on for the unsigned representation of 255 in binary, ANDing any single-byte value with 255 will return your input unchanged:

0x1 & 0xFF == 0x1
0x2 & 0xFF == 0x2
..
0xFE & 0xFF == 0xFE
0xFF & 0xFF == 0xFF

AND only gets more interesting when one of the values doesn't have every bit turned on:

0101 0101 & 0000 1111 == 0000 0101
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