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How come in the code below, the second line is giving me an undefined error?

function DAO()
{
        this.arrVariable = new Array();
        this.getItem = getItem;
        this.getItemQuery = getItemQuery;
}

function getItem(key)
{
        dao.arrVariable[key]();
}

function getItemQuery(key, url, options, pollfrequency)
{
        alert('hey');
}


var dao = new DAO();
dao.arrVariable['var1'] = function() { this.getItemQuery('a','b','c','d'); };

dao.arrVariable['var1']();

I want to be able to access the dao's getItemQuery as an object call. How do I do this?

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2  
Why do you need to use "this"? My assumption is that getItemQuery actually does more than alert 'hey'? Perhaps you could elaborate? –  John Hartsock Dec 6 '11 at 2:03
    
The DAO object will have many more properties. I'd like to be access them when I'm in the function() {this.getItemQuery} –  John Dec 6 '11 at 2:04
    
Refer to Michael's answer "this" is not needed for what you are doing. –  John Hartsock Dec 6 '11 at 2:05
    
Since dao.addVariable is declared as an array, do you really intend to add the object property var1 to it? In JavaScript, syntax like arrVariable['var1'] refers to an object property, not an array key. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 6 '11 at 2:07
    
Just as an aside, if you want an "associative array", i.e., you want to access elements based on key names rather than numeric indexes, then you should be using a JavaScript object: x = {}; x["key1"] = "A"; –  nnnnnn Dec 6 '11 at 2:07
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In that context, this refers to arrVariable. You can instead refer to it as dao.getItemQuery() inside the function:

dao.arrVariable['var1'] = function() { dao.getItemQuery('a','b','c','d'); };
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Upvoted, probably the most direct answer. –  mc10 Dec 6 '11 at 2:10
1  
To be exact, this refers to dao.arrVariable, not to the property var1 (which would be the function itself) –  Bergi Dec 6 '11 at 2:24
    
@Bergi Yes that's correct. Fixed above. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 6 '11 at 2:27
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You can use apply or call here.

So, instead of

dao.arrVariable['var1']();

Use either

dao.arrVariable['var1'].apply(dao, /* array of arguments here */);

or

dao.arrVariable['var1'].call(dao, /* arguments here, separated by commas */);
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dao.getItemQuery can access dao's property

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of course it can, why shouldn't it? –  Bergi Dec 6 '11 at 2:10
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THe this in function() { this.getItemQuery('a','b','c','d'); }; refers to function() not to DAO. You need to access DAO by:

dao.arrVariable['var1'] = function() { dao.getItemQuery('a','b','c','d'); };
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No, this refers to the object the function is called on. This might be the array in Johns secont-to-last line, or the window object if the function is called "directly". –  Bergi Dec 6 '11 at 2:18
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