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I have two iframes in the document movie.htm:

<iframe id='movies' class='top' frameborder='0'></iframe>

and

<iframe src="moviesearch.htm" class="bottom" frameborder="0">

Within moviesearch.htm there is an input tag

<input id="search_str" type="text">

I was wondering how I access this value (contained in moviesearch.htm) using JavaScript in the document movie.htm.

As the user is typing the field continuously it would require that the value be updated real-time within movie.htm.

How would I achieve this in JavaScript?

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If both pages are in the same domain, you'll be able to iframe.contentDocument. https://developer.mozilla.org/en/XUL/iframe#p-contentDocument

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It works in all browsers too. contentDocument may be a safer bet. I just like doing it the HTML5 way :P – Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 6 '11 at 2:34

postMessage. https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.postMessage

movie.htm:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
Current value:<div id="updatedvalue"></div>
<iframe src="moviesearch.htm"></iframe>

</body>
<script>
window.addEventListener
    ("message", function(e) {
    document.getElementById("updatedvalue").innerHTML = e.data;
    }, true);


</script>
</html>

moviesearch.htm:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
<input type="text" onkeyup="sendMessage(this.value)">
</body>
<script>
function sendMessage(message) {
    window.parent.postMessage(message, "*");
}
</script>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't that a security risk‌​? Anybody could (hidden) load movie.htm and post a message with a XSS attack?! Never use innerHTML, especially if you try to make it with HTML5 :) – Bergi Dec 6 '11 at 14:51
    
Yeah, for the sake of example, I didn't scan for the local domain (thus the '*'). You need to for security reasons though. – Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 6 '11 at 14:58

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