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code:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int fd = open("test.txt", O_CREAT|O_RDWR, 0200|0400);
    if(fd == -1)
    {
        printf("failure to oepn");
        exit(-1);
    }
    int iRet = write(fd, "aaaaaaaaaa", 10);

    if(iRet == -1)
    {
        printf("failure to writer");
        exit(-1);
    }
    sleep(10);
    printf("You must remove");
    iRet = write(fd, "bbbbbbbbbb", 10);

    if(iRet == -1)
    {
        printf("failure to after writer");
        exit(-1);
    }

   exit(0);
}

during the sleep(), you delete the test.txt, but the process write successful!why? if a log ”Singleton“ instance, you remove the file on the disk.write is successful, but you can get nothing.

class log
{
public:
    void loggerWriter(std::string str);
    int fd;
};

log::log(std::string filename):fd(-1)
{
    fd = open(filename.c_str(), O_CREAT|)
    //...
}

log::loggerWriter(std::string str)
{
    writer(fd, str.c_str(), str.size());
}

int main()
{
    log logger("text.txt");
    //...
    //I want to know the text.txt the text.txt have delete on the disk or not.
    //if delete i can create another file to log. 
}

"unlink" cann't solve this problem.

share|improve this question
    
The file exists, it's just that the delete trick is used to make a hidden temporary file that gets physically deleted on close() / exit(). –  moshbear Dec 6 '11 at 7:13
1  
No hidden temporary file is made. There is a file with no name, and there is its inode with reference count != 0. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Dec 6 '11 at 8:22
    
@MaximYegorushkin: the inode on disk has 0 nlink. The inode on the kernel has != 0 refcount. If the system crashes, the next time fsck runs, it will notice the 0 nlinks and dtime=0 and delete the file. –  ninjalj Dec 7 '11 at 21:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The manual page for unlink(2) states clearly:

unlink() deletes a name from the file system. If that name was the last link to a file and no processes have the file open the file is deleted and the space it was using is made available for reuse.

If the name was the last link to a file but any processes still have the file open the file will remain in existence until the last file descriptor referring to it is closed.

As caf excellently notes in the comments:

The write() is successful because it writes to the file, which still exists at this point even though it no longer has a name. The filename and the file itself are distinct, and have separate lifetimes.

share|improve this answer
1  
Which means: The write() is successful because it writes to the file, which still exists at this point even though it no longer has a name. The filename and the file itself are distinct, and have separate lifetimes. –  caf Dec 6 '11 at 7:43
    
@caf Thanks. I incorporated your comment in my answer. –  cnicutar Dec 6 '11 at 8:31
    
on the process, how to know the file was deleted? –  OCamel Dec 6 '11 at 8:50
    
@user952069 You can monitor using inotify or some library like FAM. –  cnicutar Dec 6 '11 at 8:51
1  
Its interesting to point out that python uses the feature to create secure temporary files. A temporary file is created, a descriptor generated, and then the file is immediately unliked so it cannot be opened by another process. As long as the python process keeps the descriptor, the file remains and is able to be written to / read from. However, as soon as the process releases the descriptor, the file is gone "forever". See the tempfile package –  jedwards Dec 6 '11 at 9:03

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