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I'm trying to understand a huge performance difference that I'm seeing in equivalent code. Or at least code I think is equivalent.

I have a table with about 10 million records on it. It contains a field, which is indexed defined as: USPatentNum char(8)

If I set a variable withing MySql to a value, it takes over 218 seconds. The exact same query with a string literal takes under 1/4 of a second.

In the code below, the first select statement (with where USPatentNum = @pn;) takes forever, but the second, with the literal value (where USPatentNum = '5288812';) is nearly instant

mysql> select @pn := '5288812';
+------------------+
| @pn := '5288812' |
+------------------+
| 5288812          |
+------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)


mysql> select patentId, USPatentNum, grantDate from patents where USPatentNum = @pn;
+----------+-------------+------------+
| patentId | USPatentNum | grantDate  |
+----------+-------------+------------+
|   306309 | 5288812     | 1994-02-22 |
+----------+-------------+------------+
1 row in set (3 min 38.17 sec)

mysql> select @pn;
+---------+
| @pn     |
+---------+
| 5288812 |
+---------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)


mysql> select patentId, USPatentNum, grantDate from patents where USPatentNum = '5288812';
+----------+-------------+------------+
| patentId | USPatentNum | grantDate  |
+----------+-------------+------------+
|   306309 | 5288812     | 1994-02-22 |
+----------+-------------+------------+
1 row in set (0.21 sec)

Two questions:

Why is the use of the @pn so much slower? Can I change the select statement so that the performance will be the same?

share|improve this question
    
Yes, the original problem statement says that it is indexed. –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 17:55
    
don't be smart and answer half of what I asked. Now, again, data type? –  gbn Dec 6 '11 at 18:26
    
also in original statement. USPatentNum char(8) –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 18:27

2 Answers 2

Declare @pn as char(8) before setting its value.

I suspect it will be a varchar as you do it now. If so, the performance loss is because MySql can't mach the index with your variable.

share|improve this answer
    
what syntax do I use to do the declaration? –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 17:48
    
declare @pn as varchar(8); –  idstam Dec 6 '11 at 17:51
    
<pre>declare @pn as varchar(8); ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'declare </pre> –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 17:58
    
Sorry. MsSql mode in my brain (and the wrong datatype) Try: select @pn := CAST('5288812' AS CHAR(8)) –  idstam Dec 6 '11 at 18:10
    
Still no joy. (extra space to between @ and pn due to SO) <pre> mysql> select @ pn := CAST('5288812' AS CHAR(8)); | @ pn := CAST('5288812' AS CHAR(8)) | +-----------------------------------+ | 5288812 | 1 row in set (0.03 sec) mysql> select patentId, USPatentNum, grantDate from patents where USPatentNum = @ pn limit 10; | 306309 | 5288812 | 1994-02-22 | 1 row in set (1 min 21.90 sec) mysql> select patentId, USPatentNum, grantDate from patents where USPatentNum = '5288812' limit 10; | 306309 | 5288812 | 1994-02-22 | 1 row in set (0.10 sec) </pre> –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 18:20

It doesn't matter whether you use constant or @var. You get different result because the second time MySQL gets results from cache. If you execute once again your scenario but trade places queries with const and with @var you will get them same results (but with another value). First will be slowed, second will be fast.

Hope it helps

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I swapped the order, and there is no change. Something about the @var –  fishtoprecords Dec 6 '11 at 17:46

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