Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I keep getting the feeling that I'm benefitting from maybe half of the features of Django forms, but suffering greatly at the other half of the "features."

Here's an interesting use case. I have a form that allows a user to edit their "profile." This contains a few objects, namely the following:

class UserProfile(models.Model):
    default_address = models.ForeignKey("Address")
    default_phone_number = models.ForeignKey("PhoneNumber")

class Address(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    street_address = models.CharField()
    street_address_2 = models.CharField()
    city = models.CharField()
    country = models.ForeignKey("locality.Country")
    territory = models.ForeignKey("locality.Territory", blank=True, null=True)
    postal_code = models.CharField()

class PhoneNumber(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField()
    number = models.CharField()

The "locality.*" models are from another project I wrote called django-locality, and are viewable here.

(I wrote django-locality as there simply wasn't a way of doing what I wanted at the time. I was looking to simply create this form, which included a country and a territory. As there wasn't anything that gave me database access to countries and their territories, I built something to do the job. I needed to allow users to select a country and only be able to select a territory for that country if the country had territories. Pretty simple, but it evidently hadn't been done before.)

So here's where things get a bit more complicated. My form edits django.contrib.auth.models.User's first_name and last_name fields, as well as creates or updates Address and PhoneNumber instances owned by the UserProfile class.

Validation gets really complicated really quickly. I need to make sure that 1. if a country has territories, a territory must be selected, and 2. if a territory is selected, it must belong to the selected country. Also, I ended up essentially providing a blank select control in my template, as territories have to be dynamically fetched based on the selected country. It would have been nice to simply have a form field like a "ModelOptgroupChoiceField" which would have allowed me to group my territories by their country's abbreviation, in a select control with optgroups for each country then filter these out in JavaScript, but whatever. I was able to at least get it working after much deliberation and experimentation.

Another complication in validation comes with validation of phone numbers and postal-codes: how am I supposed to validate them? Sure, django.contrib.localflavors provides controls, but provides basically no single auto-localizing control to drop in. I could write some crazy logic which would use an input country's abbreviation to look things up in the django.contrib.localflavors package and dynamically set my phone_number and postal_code fields in my form to the right values, but seriously? Do I need to go to a hack at that extreme of a length to get things working? I basically just gave up entirely on validation/formatting for these fields.

class ProfileEditForm(forms.Form):

    default_error_messages = {
        'invalid_territory': _("Please select a territory."),
        'invalid_country': _("Please select a country."),
    }

    first_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30)
    last_name = forms.CharField(max_length=30)
    street_address = forms.CharField(max_length=128)
    street_address_2 = forms.CharField(max_length=128, required=False)
    city = forms.CharField(max_length=128)
    country = forms.ModelChoiceField(Country.objects.all().order_by('name'), 
            empty_label=u'', to_field_name='iso2')
    territory = forms.ModelChoiceField(Territory.objects.all().order_by(
            'country__name', 'name'), empty_label=u'', to_field_name='pk')
    zipcode = forms.CharField(max_length=12)
    phone_number = forms.CharField(max_length=16)

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        if 'user' in kwargs:
            user = kwargs['user']
            del kwargs['user']
            kwargs['initial'] = {
                'first_name': user.first_name,
                'last_name': user.last_name,
                'street_address': user.profile.default_address.street_address
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else '',
                'street_address_2': user.profile.default_address.street_address_2 
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else '',
                'city': user.profile.default_address.city
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else '',
                'country': user.profile.default_address.country.iso2
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else None,
                'territory': user.profile.default_address.territory.pk
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else None,
                'zipcode': user.profile.default_address.postal_code
                    if user.profile.default_address != None else '',
                'phone_number': user.profile.default_phone_number.number
                    if user.profile.default_phone_number != None else None,

            }

        super(ProfileEditForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

    def clean(self):
        territory = self.cleaned_data.get('territory', None)
        country = self.cleaned_data.get('country', None)

        if territory == None or Territory.objects.filter(country__id = country.pk, 
                pk=territory.pk).count() == 0:
            self._errors['territory'] = self.error_class([
                self.default_error_messages['invalid_territory']])
            if territory != None:
                del self.cleaned_data.territory
        else:
            self.cleaned_data['territory'] = Territory.objects.get(
                country__id = country.pk, abbr = territory.abbr)

        # format phone-number
        if re.match(r'^\d{10}$', self.cleaned_data['phone_number']):
            match = re.match(r'^(\d{3})(\d{3})(\d{4})$', self.cleaned_data[
                'phone_number'])
            self.cleaned_data['phone_number'] = "%s-%s-%s" % (match.group(1),
                    match.group(2), match.group(3))

        return self.cleaned_data

If you think my form is a bit complicated, wait until you see my template in order to output things properly:

    <form method="post" action="">
        <fieldset>
            {% csrf_token %}
            <legend>Your Name</legend>
            <div class="clearfix{% if form.first_name.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                <label for="first_name_input">First Name</label>
                <div class="input">
                    <input id="first_name_input" name="first_name" class="span5" type="text"{% if form.first_name.value %} value="{{form.first_name.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                    {{ form.first_name.errors }}
                </div>
            </div>
            <div class="clearfix{% if form.last_name.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                <label for="last_name_input">Last Name</label>
                <div class="input">
                    <input id="last_name_input" name="last_name" class="span5" type="text"{% if form.last_name.value %} value="{{form.last_name.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                    {{ form.last_name.errors }}
                </div>
            </div>
        </fieldset>
        <div class="row">
            <div class="span7">
                <fieldset>
                    <legend>Your Address</legend>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.street_address.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="street_address_input">Address Line 1</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <input id="street_address_input" name="street_address" class="span5" type="text"{% if form.street_address.value %} value="{{form.street_address.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                            {{ form.street_address.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.street_address_2.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="street_address_2_input">Address Line 2</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <input id="street_address_2_input" name="street_address_2" class="span5" type="text"{% if form.street_address_2.value %} value="{{form.street_address_2.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                            {{ form.street_address_2.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.city.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="city_input">City</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <input id="city_input" name="city" data-placeholder="Your City" class="span5"{% if form.city.value %} value="{{form.city.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                            {{ form.country.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.country.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="country_input">Country</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <select id="country_input" name="country" data-placeholder="Choose a Country..."
                                    class="chzn-select span5"{% if form.country.value %} data-initialvalue="{{form.country.value}}"{% endif %}>
                                <option value=""></option>
                                {% for country in countries %}
                                <option value="{{country.abbr}}"{% if form.country.value == country.iso2 %} selected{% endif %}>{{country.name}}</option>
                                {% endfor %}
                            </select>
                            {{ form.country.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.territory.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="territory_input">Territory</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <select id="territory_input" name="territory" data-placeholder="Choose a State..."
                                class="chzn-select span5" {% if form.territory.value %} data-initialvalue="{{form.territory.value}}"{% endif %}>
                                <option value=""></option>
                            </select>
                            {{ form.territory.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                    <div class="clearfix{% if form.zipcode.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                        <label for="zipcode_input">Postal Code</label>
                        <div class="input">
                            <input id="zipcode_input" name="zipcode" class="span5" text="text"{% if form.zipcode.value %} value="{{form.zipcode.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                            {{ form.zipcode.errors }}
                        </div>
                    </div>
                </fieldset>
            </div>
        </div>
        <fieldset>
            <legend>Your Phone Number</legend>
            <div class="clearfix{% if form.phone_number.errors %} error{% endif %}">
                <label for="phone_input" text="text">Phone Number</label>
                <div class="input">
                    <input id="phone_input" name="phone_number" class="span5" text="text"{% if form.phone_number.value %} value="{{form.phone_number.value}}"{% endif %}></input>
                    {{ form.phone_number.errors }}
                </div>
            </div>
        </fieldset>
        <div class="actions clearfix">
            <input type="submit" class="btn primary" style="float:right" value="Save Changes"></input>
        </div>
    </form>

As if that's not enough, my view is likewise bloated and complicated:

@login_required
def profile_edit(request):
    if request.method == "POST":
        form = forms.ProfileEditForm(request.POST)

        if form.is_valid() == True:
            user = request.user
            profile = user.profile

            user.first_name = form.cleaned_data['first_name']
            user.last_name = form.cleaned_data['last_name']
            user.save()

            address = profile.default_address or models.Address()
            address.name = "Default" if address.name == None else address.name
            address.street_address = form.cleaned_data['street_address']
            address.street_address_2 = form.cleaned_data['street_address_2']
            address.city = form.cleaned_data['city']
            address.country = form.cleaned_data['country']
            address.territory = form.cleaned_data['territory']
            address.postal_code = form.cleaned_data['zipcode']
            address.user_profile = profile
            address.save()

            phone_number = profile.default_phone_number or models.PhoneNumber()
            phone_number.name = "Default" if phone_number.name == None else phone_number.name
            phone_number.number = form.cleaned_data['phone_number']
            phone_number.user_profile = profile
            phone_number.save()

            profile.default_address = address
            profile.default_phone_number = phone_number
            profile.save()

            return redirect("/me/profile/")
    else:
        form = forms.ProfileEditForm(user=request.user)

    return dto(request, "desktop/profile/edit.html", {"form": form,
            "countries": Country.objects.all().order_by('name'),
            "territories": Territory.objects.all().order_by('country__iso2')})

All-in-all, it's taken well over 12 hours to write this form, excluding the amount of time I've spent working on django-locality.

This seems just wrong to me. I was convinced when I was introduced to Django that it would speed up my development tenfold. Somehow, I'm a little less than impressed. Surely, I must be doing something terribly wrong here. Am I doing Django forms wrong?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think this would make for an excellent wiki discussion.

Validation gets really complicated really quickly. I need to make sure that 1. if a country has territories, a territory must be selected, and 2. if a territory is selected, it must belong to the selected country. Also, I ended up essentially providing a blank select control in my template, as territories have to be dynamically fetched based on the selected country. It would have been nice to simply have a form field like a "ModelOptgroupChoiceField" which would have allowed me to group my territories by their country's abbreviation, in a select control with optgroups for each country then filter these out in JavaScript, but whatever. I was able to at least get it working after much deliberation and experimentation.

When I ran into this problem, I used client side validation with javascript to solve the "if this selected, then make sure that is selected" problem.

As for grouping, I usually employ the multiselect widget from jquery.

Another complication in validation comes with validation of phone numbers and postal-codes: how am I supposed to validate them? Sure, django.contrib.localflavors provides controls, but provides basically no single auto-localizing control to drop in. I could write some crazy logic which would use an input country's abbreviation to look things up in the django.contrib.localflavors package and dynamically set my phone_number and postal_code fields in my form to the right values, but seriously? Do I need to go to a hack at that extreme of a length to get things working? I basically just gave up entirely on validation/formatting for these fields.

For pre-filling/masking fields, use javascript; and for lookups, use ajax calls. It is a lot easier that way.

As for back end validation; I find that custom fields and validators go a long way.

django-uni-form is an elegant approach to form rendering that will clean up your templates somewhat.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm currently using Chosen form my selects, it's awesomely taking care of business. Also, client-side validation isn't really safe at all; if someone simply POSTs my form with invalid data, it'll be persisted. –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Dec 6 '11 at 8:34
    
I can see your point on writing custom fields, it might be best to do that. I'm just frustrated that it feels like I'm running in mud here trying to throw together relatively simple things. –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Dec 6 '11 at 8:35
    
I really like django-uni-form and am looking into it. I just wish I would have known about it before I spent 12 hours doing it this way. Time-waste-fail of epic proportions. –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Dec 6 '11 at 8:36
  1. Do you really need one huge form for your three models? What about three seperate forms?

  2. Why not to use ModelForm to generate forms from models? You won't need to set initials manually.

  3. You can place phone validation in validator. I don't think you can get rid of territory validation but it's better to place in model's clean.

  4. You template can be rewritten to be more DRY. Use custom template tag (inclusion one) to output form. Or is there a problem with it?

  5. Using ModelForm will make your view more clean. You will just need to override it save methods sometimes. It should look like this.

    @login_required
    def profile_edit(request):
        user_form = forms.UserForm(request.POST or None, prefix='user', instance=request.user)
        address_form = forms.AddressForm(request.POST or None, prefix='address',   instance=request.user.profile.default_address)
        phone_form = forms.PhoneForm(request.POST or None, prefix='phone',  instance=request.user.profile.default_phone_number)
    
        if user_form.is_valid() and address_form.is_valid() and \
                   phone_form.is_valid():
                       user = user_form.save()
                       address = address_form.save(commit=False)
                       address.user_profile = user.profile
                       address.save()
                       phone_number = phone_form.save(commit=False)
                       phone_number.user_profile = user.profile
                       phone_number.save()
                       user.profile.default_address = address
                       user.profile.default_phone_number = phone_number
                       user.profile.save()
                       return redirect("/me/profile/")
    
        return dto(request, "desktop/profile/edit.html", {"form": form,
                        "countries": Country.objects.all().order_by('name'),
                        "territories": Territory.objects.all().order_by('country__iso2')})
    
  6. I don't think your model organization is good. Why not to add default field to Phone and Address? Something like this (for phone).

    class UserProfile(models.Model):
        ... your fields here ...
    
        @property
        def default_phone(self):
            return self.phones.filter(default=True)[0]
    
    class PhoneNumber(models.Model):
        profile = models.ForeignKey(UserProfile, related_name='phones')
        default = models.BooleanField()
        name = models.CharField()
        number = models.CharField()
    
share|improve this answer
    
1. Yeah, I kind of do. This is what makes up a user's "profile," at least from an enduser's point of view. 2. I don't know if I can use ModelForm, as I'm editing about 3-4 different models at once. 3. I should place it in model's clean and not form's clean? 4. There isn't a better way to do field formatting/templating? 6. I'm not sure what you mean. –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Dec 6 '11 at 8:32
    
@TK Kocheran 1. Where are you doing this? I just see one form. 2. You can if you use a ModelForm for each model you are editing. 3. I think it's more logical, but it's not the main issue. 4. As I see you repeat same code several times for each field. Using iteration is definetely the better way. 6. I added example to the answer. –  DrTyrsa Dec 6 '11 at 8:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.