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I've noticed that there are a few more interesting declarations in <exception> in C++11. Can anybody shed any light on what they mean and how to use them?

The ones I'm wondering about are:

  1. ::std::nested_exception
  2. ::std::throw_with_nested
  3. ::std::rethrow_if_nested

Additionally, while they seem self-explanatory, it might be nice to know how these worked:

  1. ::std::exception_ptr
  2. ::std::make_exception_ptr
  3. ::std::current_exception
  4. ::std::rethrow_exception
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1  
A good (the best?) description is available in the standard. You can read the last publicly available draft for free. –  ybungalobill Dec 6 '11 at 9:16
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1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Some high level code will generically just catch std::exception and print the what(). You want to squeeze as much information as possible to this generic mechanism, yet without losing any information. Consider an implementation of some archive library:

archive::archive(const char* filename)
{
    ifstream file(filename)
    file.exceptions(ios_base::badbit);
    open_archive(file); // throws ios_base::failure, or some other low-level exception.
}

The information available to the archive is not recorded (e.g. filename). Besides you would like to distinguish exceptions that came from the archive class from other exceptions.

archive::archive(const char* filename)
{
    try {
        ifstream file(filename)
        file.exceptions(ios_base::badbit);
        open_archive(file); // throws ios_base::failure, or some other low-level exception.
    } catch(const std::exception& e) {
        throw archive_exception("Can't open archive", filename, e.what());
    }
}

Now we added higher-level semantic information that archive class knows, but we also lost the information about the original cause of problem (the type of e). nested_exception is meant to solve this problem:

archive::archive(const char* filename)
{
    try {
        ifstream file(filename)
        file.exceptions(ios_base::badbit);
        open_archive(file); // throws ios_base::failure, or some other low-level exception.
    } catch(...) {
        throw_with_nested(archive_exception("Can't open archive", filename));
    }
}

All the available information is recorded. We can now generically retrieve it in the catch site:

void print_exception_info(const std::exception& e)
{
    cerr << e.what() << "\n";
    try {
        rethrow_if_nested(e);
    } catch(const std::exception& ne) {
        print_exception_info(ne);
    } catch(...) { }
}

int main() {
    try {
        run();
    } catch(const std::exception& e) {
        print_exception_info(e);
    }
}

The output will be more descriptive than before. It will describe the problem starting from the high-level to the low-level:

Can't open archive "my_archive.bin"

Access is denied.

Or perhaps:

Can't open archive "my_archive.bin"

Record 'aabb' not found.

The functions working with exception_ptr are designed to transfer exceptions between threads, or more generally, store an exception for later use. How they work depends on the implementation. The intention was that exception_ptr will be a shared pointer to the exception object. However when this pointer is created, when throwing the exception or when trying to get an exception_ptr to it, is subject to the implementation. The implementation is still free to copy the exception when you call current_exception().

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Wouldn't print_exception_info look better as something like try { std::rethrow_if_nested(); } catch...? –  Cubbi Dec 6 '11 at 15:33
    
I have generally been reserving places to stuff the low level exception in my high level exceptions when I want to do this. But I can see how this generic mechanism is better since you can have a very generic handler that unwraps it all. –  Omnifarious Dec 6 '11 at 16:17
    
I borrowed much of your example for cppreference.com - feel free to edit that wiki if you wish to remove or improve it. –  Cubbi Dec 6 '11 at 16:18
    
@Cubbi: You're absolutely right! Thank you! –  ybungalobill Dec 6 '11 at 18:04
1  
In case anyone wants to use this with GCC, keep in mind bug 51438 –  Cubbi Dec 6 '11 at 20:10
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