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I defined a function called multiply and it takes arguments R0 and R1 and saves the result in R3. This sucks because whenever I call multiply I have to put the operands in R0 and R1 and move what was in R0, R1 and R3 somewhere else. Is there a way to make the function take the form multiply R4, R5, R6 similar to how add R1, R2, R3

ldr R0, =snakes
ldr R1, [R0], #4
mov R2, #15
mov R3, #6

If I want to multiply R2 and R3 this would require extra work. I call multiply often and am wondering if there's a better way?

Multiply:
    stmfd   sp!,{r0-r2, lr}
    mov R2, #1
    mov R3, #0 
    repeat:
        add R3, R1, R3  
        add R2, R2, #1
        cmp R2, R0
        ble repeat
    mov R2, R3
    LDMFD   sp!,{r0-r1, pc}
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what about posting some code? ;D –  Matteo Dec 6 '11 at 8:56
    
What exactly is the problem? –  Jens Björnhager Dec 6 '11 at 8:57
    
are you trying to defeat the calling convention that some compiler is using? You can get around that with inline assembly. Is this ARM? Look at the multiply routines, shift and accumulate should be faster than a looped add for anything over 32 loops...If multiplying numbers smaller than 32 then use a look up table. –  dwelch Dec 6 '11 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use macros:

.macro multiply A B C
{body}
.endm

Values of parameters in the body are avaliable by \A, \B, \C

there is a little mistake in your code:

Multiply:
    stmfd   sp!,{r0-r2, lr}
    mov R2, #1
    mov R3, #0 
    repeat:
        add R3, R1, R3  
        add R2, R2, #1
        cmp R2, R0
        ble repeat
    mov R2, R3
    LDMFD   sp!,{r0-r1, pc}

When R0 is 0, the result would be R1 instead of 0. So you have to check it before it enters the loop. The correct code will be:

stmfd   sp!,{r0-r2, lr}
mov R2, #0
mov R3, #0 
repeat:
    cmp R2, R0
    be exit_loop
    add R3, R1, R3  
    add R2, R2, #1
    b repeat
exit_loop:
mov R2, R3
LDMFD   sp!,{r0-r1, pc}

But this is not the most optimal method because there are 5 instructions in loop's body instead of 4, and 2 branches instead of 1, so it will be difficult to predict them both. That's why we going to do the following:

stmfd   sp!,{r0-r2, lr}
mov R2, #-1
rsb R3, R1, #0 
repeat:
    add R3, R1, R3  
    add R2, R2, #1
    cmp R2, R0
    bne repeat
mov R2, R3
LDMFD   sp!,{r0-r1, pc}

And finally, with macros it will look like this:

.macro multiply C B A
stmfd   sp!,{\A, \B, \C, r2, lr}
mov R2, #-1
rsb \C, \B, #0 
repeat:
    add \C, \B, \C  
    add R2, R2, #1
    cmp R2, \A
    bne repeat
LDMFD   sp!,{\A, \B, \C, r2, pc}
.endm

multiply R3 R2 R1 will save the result into R3

But I don't know why you want to write your own multiply macro, I hope you know, that there is a set of multiply instructions...

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Many assemblers support macros. See if your assembler supports them, they will help eliminate unnecessary register stores and loads. You'd just specify your r0,r1,r3 or r4,r5,r5 or whatever you want as macro parameters and the assembly will substitute the registers given as parameters into the body of the macro.

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