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I have the following template class and a (global) variable of its type:

template <typename ClassT>
struct ClassTester : public ClassT {
    typedef ClassT type;
};

ClassTester<int> *aaa;  // No error here

I would expect a compilation error because int cannot be derived from, but this compiles fine under Visual C++ 2010.

If I remove the pointer, I get the expected compilation error (int cannot be derived from):

ClassTester<int> bbb; // Error here

I wanted to use this class for SFINAE testing whether the given type is a class that can be derived from:

template <typename T>
struct CanBeDerivedFrom  {

    template <typename C>
    static int test(ClassTester<T> *) { }

    template <typename>
    static char test(...) { }

    static const bool value = (sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(int));
};

This, however, always reports true, even for primitive types such as int because of the above reason. Is this an expected/valid behavior of C++?

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1  
I suspect the reason is that simply declaring/defining a pointer does not require actually instantiating the template. After all, you don't use that ClassTester<int>* for anything. –  visitor Dec 6 '11 at 9:55
    
A similar example would be checking whether a template parameter is POD or non POD. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 6 '11 at 10:03
    
I was going to suggest as visitor had. I don't believe declaring a pointer will instantiate the template, which is why it may compile. Try accessing a member using the template via the pointer, which would force the compiler to instantiate the template. Otherwise, I'm not too sure - but I know that you can't inherit an integer type. –  Jeremy Dec 6 '11 at 10:06
    
@Jeremy: Then it gives a compiler error that the class cannot derive from int. That's also weird, I thought SFINAE would just reject that overload and not throw an error. –  Karel Petranek Dec 6 '11 at 10:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think it's not possible entirely to get a class which is derivable through SFINAE (which includes also the cases of final class in C++11). The best thing which can be done is to have a SFINAE for finding if a type is a class and rely upon that.

template<typename T>
struct void_ { typedef void type; };

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct CanBeDerivedFrom {
  static const bool value = false;
};

template<typename T>
struct CanBeDerivedFrom<T, typename void_<int T::*>::type> {
  static const bool value = true;
};

This metaprogram will find if the given type is class/union or not. demo.

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1  
Even though it's not 100% the answer, it's definitely an interesting approach. –  Karel Petranek Dec 6 '11 at 10:46

Do not reinvent the wheel. Use boost::is_class boost reference manual

Those guys known better than you do.

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2  
boost::is_class does a bit different thing - it tests whether the given type is a class. I want to test whether the type can be derived from. These two are not the same in the new C++11 standard. And I haven't found any Boost type trait that would help me achieve this. –  Karel Petranek Dec 6 '11 at 9:56
2  
This answer is very rude. –  iammilind Dec 6 '11 at 10:02
    
I don't think he meant for it to be rude. Hes saying that BOOST has done their research in the sort of thing for a while so you're better off using boost:is_class or at least taking a look at how it was implemented. –  Jeremy Dec 6 '11 at 10:13
1  
I did not mean to be rude. You can make a class not derivable through various techniques, such as this one link that is surely not detectable until you try to instantiate a variable of a derived class if you do not specify a ctor in the derived class (and wait for the compiler to autogenerate one and emit an error). boost::is_class is surely the simpler, more portable way to achieve something near it. See comments about clang and final in this thread too. –  reder Dec 6 '11 at 11:18
    
When I come to read about something I'd like to understand, being told to just use someone else's solution 'cause they know better is quite offensive. I realize that wasn't your intent, however I very much dislike this form of "answer". –  MGaz Aug 13 at 18:03

Unfortunately I think that this is actually impossible.

Many issues may prevent derivation (or at least, useful derivation), the addition of final to the standard being one.

For example, see this thread on the Clang mailing list where Howard Hinnant requires a compiler intrinsic to check whether the class is marked as final or not.

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I was going to suggest as visitor had. I don't believe declaring a pointer will instantiate the template, which is why it may compile. Try accessing a member using the template via the pointer, which would force the compiler to instantiate the template. Otherwise, I'm not too sure - but I know that you can't inherit an integer type.

So, the answer I suppose would be you don't need to, as the code probably won't compile in the event that you do try to instantiate a template class inheriting an integer type. I may be wrong, but I believe the only reason it is compiling is because creating a pointer type does not instantiate the template.

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If I try accessing the pointer it gives a compiler error that the class cannot derive from int. That's also weird, I thought SFINAE would just reject that overload and not throw an error. –  Karel Petranek Dec 6 '11 at 10:44

You can use RTTI(Run Time Type Information) to know what type the class belongs to , and if the class is of basic type you can tell that the class cannot be derived from.

Ex: if(typeid(T) == typeid(int) || typeid(T) == typeid(float)) { cout << "The class cannot be derived from"; }

You can add more types if you want , to the IF condition

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Thanks for your answer but I need this at compile time, not runtime. –  Karel Petranek Dec 6 '11 at 9:50
#include <typeinfo>

main()
{
 int i;
 int * pi;
 cout << int is:  << typeid(int).name() << endl;
 cout <<   i is: << typeid(i).name() << endl;
 cout <<  pi is:  << typeid(pi).name() << endl;
 cout << *pi is:  << typeid(*pi).name() << endl << endl;

}

it prints:


int
int
int*
int

as expected..

someone needs to be indipendent of other library...so boost library it s not a good answer..

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