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This is one segment of codes used in one of my project for managing one of my class instance:

@interface C: NSObject
{
    NSMutableArray *myArr;
}

@property (nonatomic,retain) NSMutableArray *myArr;

//...

@end

@implementation C

@synthesize myArr;

//...

-(id)init
{
//...
    myArr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
//...
}

//version 1 of dealloc method
-(void)dealloc
{
//...
        self.myArr = nil;
//...
}

//version 2 of dealloc method
-(void)dealloc
{
//...
    [myArr release];
//...
}

here the version 1 dealloc method doesn't work and Xcode says something like "EXC_BAD_ACCESS..." and the app crashed. if I modified the dealloc method as version 2, it works.

Does anybody have any idea why? Thx in advance.

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The problem is elsewhere –  Alex Nichol Dec 6 '11 at 19:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As Duncan said, the EXEC_BAD_ACCESS error means that the object doesn't exist anymore.

This is probably due to the fact that myArr is being released before the dealloc gets called.

To facilitate memory management and to keep track of reference counts, I like to make it clearer in the init methods, for example:

-(id)init
{
//...

    NSMutableArray *array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] initWithCapacity:0];
    self.myArr = array;
    [array release];

//...
}

By using the generated setter self.myArr = array; you are ensuring that the reference count is being delt with correctly, it will release the old value and retain the new one for you.

@MadhavanRP : if the property is a retained property:

@property(nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray *myArr;

calling

self.myArr = nil

is exactely the same as calling

[myArr release];
myArr = nil;

Edit: @Sylvain beat me to it :)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 exactly right... –  jbat100 Dec 6 '11 at 10:30
    
+1,thank you, I was wrong on that. –  MadhavanRP Dec 6 '11 at 11:12
    
Thank you very much but it was not the property's problem. It is because the un-properly implemented init method that leads to this problem. the self here is a random value. Thank you all the same. –  xuxu Dec 6 '11 at 17:48

This is OK even if it's bad idea/confusing to have same name for iVar and property. I removed the iVar declaration.

@interface C: NSObject
{}

@property (nonatomic,retain) NSMutableArray *myArr;

//...

@end

Generate your iVar using @synthetize.

@implementation C

@synthesize myArr = _myArr;

//...

Your init is all wrong. You are assigning the iVar without using the setter method.

-(id)init
{
    //...
    // You were doing
    // _myArr = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    // You should do
    NSMutableArray array = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];
    self.myArr = array;
    [array release];
    // You could avoid the temporary variable but this confuse XCode static analyzer
    //...
}

This is OK. I guess that @synthetize generated another iVar to back your property. This other iVar was not properly assign.

You would not notice this if you do not user self.myArr (or the equivalent [self myArr]).

This confusion is main reason why hardcore ObjC programmer do not like the new property thing. :) This confuse new programmers.

//version 1 of dealloc method
-(void)dealloc
{
    //...
    self.myArr = nil;
    //...
}

This is not good as you bypass the setter, as in init method. This was working anyway.

//version 2 of dealloc method
-(void)dealloc
{
//...
    [myArr release];
//...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much but it was not the property's problem. It is because the un-properly implemented init method that leads to this problem. the self here is a random value. Thank you all the same. –  xuxu Dec 6 '11 at 17:48
    
OK. It was all behind the //... so :) –  Sylvain G. Dec 7 '11 at 14:20

It looks like your myArr object is being messaged when it should not be, in the first case you hide the problem by setting it to nil, in the second you don't. Either method should not crash. When do you call [super dealloc]; (you should call it at the end of the dealloc implementation).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much but it was not the property's problem. It is because the un-properly implemented init method that leads to this problem. the self here is a random value. Thank you all the same. –  xuxu Dec 6 '11 at 17:49

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