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I have a list like this (let's say it is memorized in summ.txt):

s1   d2
s1   d4
s3   d2
s4   d1
s1   d3 
s4   d1
s5   d6
s3   d5
s1   d2

I need to obtain, for every element in the first column (s_) the number of distinct element on the second one (d_). In this case:

s1  3
s3  2
s4  1   
s5  1

I'm using a shell script to obtain this:

sor=`cat s.txt`

for d in $sor
do

n=$( grep $d ./summ.txt | cut -f2 | sort -u | wc -l)
echo $d, $n

done

Where s.txt is the files that contains all the different s_. In this case it will be:

s1
s2
s3
s4
s5

I know that this approach works because I've tried it. The main problem is that the main list (summ.txt) is made of about 19 milion elements and the number of different s_ is about 3 milion, so it will take too much time to compute all. Can you suggest a faster algorithm?

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1  
+1 This would make a good code golf question. –  Phil Dec 7 '11 at 3:03
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Rather than going through the file once for each s_, do them all at once:

sort -u | cut -f 1 | uniq -c | awk '{ print $2","$1 }'

Applied to your sample data, this gives:

s1,3
s3,2
s4,1
s5,1

The processing done in this answer is about the same as that done for each s_ in the shell script in the question. Thus, I'd expect a speedup by a factor of about 3 million.

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Your approach is so simple that I'm wondering why I didn't think of it before! It is exactly what I needed, –  markusian Dec 7 '11 at 10:27
1  
This answer shows the power of the Unix toolkit and pipes. Small programs that do 1 thing well. Good luck to all. –  shellter Dec 7 '11 at 18:03
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The sorting step is O(n lg n) and can be avoided in favor of a linear-time algorithm. Here's a Python version:

distinct_values = defaultdict(set)  # hashmap of keys to hashsets of values
for line in sys.stdin:
    key, val = line.split()
    distinct_values[key].add(val)

for key, values in distinct_values.iteritems():
    print key, len(values)

(Sorted output can be obtained in O(k lg k) extra time, where k is the number of distinct keys.)

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+1 for listing time complexity in your answer! –  jedwards Dec 6 '11 at 12:47
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Use a DBMS?

Or...

sort <input_file | awk -f counter.awk

#!/usr/bin/awk

// {
    if ($1!=prevfirstkey) {
       dump();
       prevfirstkey=$1;
       prevnextkey=$2;
       count=1;
    } else if ($2 != prevnextkey) {
       prevnextkey=$2;
       count++;
    }
}
dump() {
    print prevfirstkey " has " count " values";
    count=0;
}
END {
    dump();
}
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BTW there are various options for tuning sort - see the man page. –  symcbean Dec 6 '11 at 12:29
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