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So I want to delete a row from a table e.g

1

2

3

4

5

7

8

How do I rename the tables rows primary keys so they are equal to

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

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7  
You don't. There is no reason to keep your primary keys sequential. The whole point is that you can delete #4 and the rest of the records are unaffected. –  meagar Dec 6 '11 at 13:55
    
I am doing it for aesthetic reasons. –  Sid Webber Dec 6 '11 at 13:56
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That is the worst possible reason. Do not do this. This is not how databases work. –  meagar Dec 6 '11 at 13:57
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Also it can be more useful, if you reference the deleted row, that you get an error, instead of a completely different row. –  rankep Dec 6 '11 at 13:57
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@SidWebber Then you should not use this as primary key –  OptimusCrime Dec 6 '11 at 13:58
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3 Answers 3

This question comes frequently but it's a false problem. You don't have to care about id. It's just an identifier. Leave it as it is.

You can add a progressive number programmatically, using your favourite programming language or via sql.

select *,@row:=@row+1 as progressive_number
from table, (select @row:=0) as t
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You shouldn't rename primary keys. Their function is to provide a unique internal identifier in your database. Even it has a sequence like 1, 10, 43, 88 .. it doesn't matter as it should have no cosmetic meaning whatsoever.

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You can delete the row by its primary key...

delete from my_table where id = 4

And then decrement all subsequent keys:

update my_table set id = id - 1 where id > 4;

Assuming all the foreign keys referencing the primary key are set to on update cascade, the internal referential integrity will be maintained. If you're using the numeric id to build URLs, your URLs are all now broken.

But you absolutely should not do this. This is not how databases work. It is not a case of aesthetics, it is outright wrong to do this with your data. This is literally no good reason to do this, and a ton of reasons not to.

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1  
That oxymoron again. "Here is the code but don't use it". Can you make your mind first? –  Your Common Sense Dec 6 '11 at 14:13
    
My mind was pretty obviously made up, and "here is the code but don't use it for these reasons" is still a better answer than your all too common "don't do it". When somebody asks how to do something, "don't" is not an answer. –  meagar Dec 6 '11 at 14:46
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