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When pointers point to something declared in the same class, am I right in thinking that if you copy such an object that there are multiple sets of pointers but they all point to the same object(s)?

Does this mean there are other objects in the other class instances that have been created but that nothing is pointing to?

And as a side question, would I be right in thinking that a shared pointer would point all the classes at ONE set of objects but in a safe way?

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1  
Please write a clear question. This should include code, and forward-only reading, no chatty backreferences. –  Kerrek SB Dec 6 '11 at 14:16
    
@KerrekSB chatty back-references? where am I referring back to anything? Please write a clear comment. –  SirYakalot Dec 6 '11 at 16:24
    
The question has been edited since. The original text said something like "as it says in the question title"... anyway, please still provide some code to show what you want to do. –  Kerrek SB Dec 6 '11 at 16:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

yes - when you don't define a copy constructor the compiler will issue one for you - which will do a shallow copy - just copy the values(i.e the address) of the pointers.

So the two objects(original and 'copy') will have pointer fields pointing at the same object.

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and will the copied object therefore have objects that nothing is pointed to? –  SirYakalot Dec 6 '11 at 16:16
    
@SirYakalot: Likely yes. –  sharptooth Dec 6 '11 at 16:22
    
and is a shared pointer essentially a safe way of having all objects point at one thing? Or is the word "shared" a bit of a misnomer here? –  SirYakalot Dec 6 '11 at 16:23
    
it's not a good practice - because very often you destroy the objects you point to in the destructor(of the parent object) so if you have objects A1 and A2 pointing at object B, when A1 gets out of scope its destructor gets called and it will release B, leaving A2 with an invalid pointer –  Bond Dec 6 '11 at 16:43

If you don't deep copy the object i.e. if you don't override the copy c'tor and do a shallow copy, the pointer(s) will point to the same instance of an object. If you then delete one of the shallow - copied objects then the pointers of the other objects will point to garbage. If you dereference them in any way your program will crash.

Same thing can happen with the assignment operator. So when you have pointers overload them both.

An example:

struct Message
{
    Message(const LogType_E & type_in = LOG_ERROR, const unsigned int & domain_in = 0, const int & msgId_in = 0, const char * msg_in = "");
    int myMsgID;            //!< message id
    unsigned int myDomain;  //!< message domain
    LogType_E myType;       //!< message type
    char * myMsg;           //!< actual message 

    ~Message()
    {
        if(myMsg != NULL) delete [] myMsg;
    }

    Message(const Message &);

    const Message& operator=(const Message & rhs);
};

This is a "message" type used to hold a message with other thingies.

Implementation would look like :

Message::Message(const Message & cp_in):myType(cp_in.myType), myDomain(cp_in.myDomain), myMsgID(cp_in.myMsgID), myMsg(NULL)
{
    if(cp_in.myMsg != NULL)
    {
        myMsg = new char[strlen(cp_in.myMsg)+1];
        memcpy (myMsg, cp_in.myMsg, strlen(cp_in.myMsg)+1); 
    }
}

const Message & Message::operator =(const AX::Base::Log::Message &cp_in)
{
    if (this == &cp_in) // protect against invalid self-assignment
        return *this;

    //deallocate old memory
    if(myMsg != NULL) delete [] myMsg;

    if(cp_in.myMsg != NULL)
    {
    //allocate new memory and copy the elements
        myMsg = new char[strlen(cp_in.myMsg)+1];
        memcpy (myMsg, cp_in.myMsg, strlen(cp_in.myMsg)+1); 
    }

    // copy other data members
    myType = cp_in.myType;
    myDomain = cp_in.myDomain;
    myMsgID = cp_in.myMsgID;

    return *this;
}

That said, please use std::string to avoid all these things - that was just a proof of concept example.

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You are trying to delete myMsg in the else part of the copy constructor when you haven't even initialised it! –  Bleep Bloop Dec 6 '11 at 15:44
    
@BleepBloop Bad copy :) thanks.. –  FailedDev Dec 6 '11 at 15:55

Imagine you have a class like so that exhibits the problem you have asked in the question

class Foo{};

class Bar
{
public:
    Foo* mFoo;
    Bar() : mFoo( new Foo() ) {}
    ~Bar() { delete mFoo;}
};

And code like so

Bar x ;
Bar y = x;

The above code will cause an core dump because both y and x will point to the same Foo and the destructor will try to delete the same Foo twice.

ALTERNATIVE 1

Declare but not provide a definition so that Bar is never copy constructor or assigned. The will ensure that Bar y = x will have a link error as you have designed the class not be copied.

class Bar
{
public:
    Foo* mFoo;
    Bar() : mFoo( new Foo() ) {}
    ~Bar() { delete mFoo;}

    Bar(const Bar &);
    Bar& operator= (const Bar &);
};

ALTERNATIVE 2

Provide a copy constructor and assignment operator that do the right thing. Instead of the compiler provided default implementation of copy and assignment that do shallow copy you are duplicating Foo so that both x and y have their own Foo

class Bar
{
public:
    Foo* mFoo;
    Bar() : mFoo( new Foo() ) {}
    ~Bar() { delete mFoo;}

    Bar(const Bar & src)
    {
        mFoo = new Foo( *(src.mFoo) );
    }

    Bar& operator= (const Bar & src)
    {
        mFoo = new Foo( *(src.mFoo) );
        return *this;
    }
};

ALTERNATIVE 3 (BEST)

Use C++11 shared_ptr or boost and omit the copy and assigment as the default compiler provided one will do the right thing as shared_ptr is ref counted and will delete Foo only once even though both x and y share the same Foo. Also notice that ~Bar needs to no explicit clean up as mFoo will automatically be deleted in std::shared_ptr<Foo> destructor when the the refcount of Foo becomes zero.

class Bar
{
public:
    std::shared_ptr<Foo> mFoo;
    Bar() :mFoo( new Foo() ) {}
    ~Bar() { }
};
share|improve this answer

Let the code do the talking to clear things up:

struct X
{
    int data;
    int *ptr;

    X() : ptr(&data) {}
};

X a;
X b = a; // yes, `a.ptr` points to `b.data`!

Indeed, the pointers will be copied verbatim and will keep pointing into the source of the copy.

Use pointer-to-members

Fixable thus:

struct X
{
    int data;
    int X::*ptr;

    X() : ptr(&X::data) {}
};

X a;
X b = a; // now, `a.ptr` points to `a.data`

Extending this sample with some more usage hints https://ideone.com/F0rC3

a.ptr = &X::data2;  // now `a.ptr` points to `a.data2`
                    //     `b.ptr` points to `b.data1`
b = a;              //     `b.ptr` points to `b.data2` too

// Usage hint:
int deref = a.*(a.ptr); // gets the field pointed to by a.ptr, from the instance a
    deref = b.*(b.ptr); // gets the field pointed to by b.ptr, from the instance b

// but of course you could get fancy and do
    deref = a.*(b.ptr); // gets the field pointed to by b.ptr, **but** from the instance a

That would do what you probably want. Although, why you want that is beyond me (and beyond C++, possibly)

share|improve this answer
    
expanded the code sample –  sehe Dec 6 '11 at 16:54

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