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UITextField *textField;
UISwitch *someSwitch;

NSManagedObject *editedObject;
NSString *editedFieldKey;
NSString *editedFieldName;


NSString *z=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@",[editedObject valueForKey:editedFieldKey]];      
    NSString *y=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"b"]; 
    if(z==y){
        [someSwitch setOn:YES animated:YES];
    }
    else{[someSwitch setOn:NO animated:YES];}

-(IBAction) toggleButtonPressed{

NSString *a=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"a"];
NSString *b=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"b"];

if(someSwitch.on){

    [editedObject setValue:b forKey:editedFieldKey];
}
else{

    [editedObject setValue:a forKey:editedFieldKey]; 

} 
}

-(IBAction)save {

NSUndoManager * undoManager = [[editedObject managedObjectContext] undoManager];
[undoManager setActionName:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", editedFieldName]];

if (editingName){
    [editedObject setValue:textField.text forKey:editedFieldKey];
}else{
    [self toggleButtonPressed];
}

[self.navigationController popViewControllerAnimated:YES];
}

I can't get a UISwitch to work in the context of Core Data and detail view controllers. When you create a BOOL in core data, then have the corresponding class made in xcode, it makes an NSNumber. This is fine but instead of making "0" and "1"'s when data is saved and recalled, it comes up with very large integers (7-8 digits). What I did above was to store the information as a binary string, using "a" or "b" for the string for storage. This hasn't worked well, mostly because I can't get the UISwitch to load with the previously stored value (on or off). I am sure this has been dealt with before, but I can't find much documentation online. If there are any ideas or suggestions, relative to the above code, let me know. Thanks.

2011-12-06 15:49:41.042 sampNav[820:207] 101783056
2011-12-06 15:49:41.043 sampNav[820:207] 80887600

- (IBAction)save {

NSUndoManager * undoManager = [[editedObject managedObjectContext] undoManager];
[undoManager setActionName:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", editedFieldName]];

if (editingName){
    [editedObject setValue:textField.text forKey:editedFieldKey];
}else{

    [self toggleButtonPressed];

}

[self.navigationController popViewControllerAnimated:YES];

}

-(IBAction) toggleButtonPressed{
if (someSwitch.on==YES) 
{
    [editedObject setValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:1] forKey:editedFieldKey];
    NSLog(@"%d",[editedObject valueForKey:editedFieldKey]);

}
else [editedObject setValue:[NSNumber numberWithInt:0] forKey:editedFieldKey];
NSLog(@"%d",[editedObject valueForKey:editedFieldKey]);

}

The problem is when these values are stored as NSNumber objects the values are large integers. The NSLog is given at the very top. Can anyone explain this?

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1 Answer 1

your code as it stands:

if(z==y){

Is comparing pointers not the strings, you need:

if([z isEqualToString:y]){

To get the string comparison to work so that the switch has the correct initial state...

But you really want to use the core data BOOL version and get the value of the NSNumber that is stored in the NSManagedObject. I suspect you are not converting the NSNumber pointer to object into a boolValue.

if([[editedObject valueForKey:editedFieldKey] boolValue]) {
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