Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create a new object of type T via its constructor when adding to the list.

I'm getting a compile error: The error message is:

'T': cannot provide arguments when creating an instance of a variable

But my classes do have a constructor argument! How can I make this work?

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : new()
{
   ...
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
   {
       tabListItems.Add(new T(listItem)); // error here.
   } 
   ...
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Create instance of generic type? –  nawfal Apr 23 '13 at 7:23

10 Answers 10

up vote 245 down vote accepted

In order to create an instance of a generic type in a function you must constrain it with the "new" flag.

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : new()

However that will only work when you want to call the constructor which has no parameters. Not the case here. Instead you'll have to provide another parameter which allows for the creation of object based on parameters. The easiest is a function.

public static string GetAllItems<T>(..., Func<ListItem,T> del) {
  ...
  List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
  foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
  {
    tabListItems.Add(del(listItem));
  }
  ...
}

You can then call it like so

GetAllItems<Foo>(..., l => new Foo(l));
share|improve this answer
49  
+1 nice work around for the constructor limitations. Be nice if future version would support parameterized constructor constraints –  JoshBerke May 8 '09 at 15:12
1  
Sneaky, I like it. –  Garry Shutler May 8 '09 at 15:15
4  
+1. Annoying, but better than nothing. –  Richard Berg Aug 10 '09 at 16:25
    
How would this work when called internally from a generic class? I have posted my code in an answer below. I don't know the concrete class internally, as it's a generic class. Is there a way round this. I dont want to use the other suggestion of using property initialiser syntax as that will bypass the logic I have in the constructor –  ChrisCa Nov 5 '09 at 16:28
1  
Thanks. In my case I know the constructor's argument(s) when I call the method, I just needed to get around the Type parameter's limitation that it could not be constructed with parameters, so I used a thunk. The thunk is an optional parameter to the method, and I only use it if provided: T result = thunk == null ? new T() : thunk(); The benefit of this for me is consolidating the logic of T creation in one place rather than sometimes creating T inside and sometimes outside of the method. –  Carl G May 13 '12 at 23:18

You could use the activator class:

(T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), args)
share|improve this answer
2  
Whoa, this SO simplifies things! Too bad I didn't know this before. –  Kos Jun 16 '12 at 16:59
1  
we could also use expression tree to build the object –  Welly Tambunan Jan 18 '13 at 3:07
4  
Sexiest solution, love it :) +1 –  SoMoS Feb 12 '13 at 18:15
2  
What is args? an object[]? –  user1588303 May 14 '13 at 16:32
4  
+1 me love you long time –  leukosaima Mar 5 at 17:58

Since nobody bothered to post the 'Reflection' answer (which I personally think is the best answer), here goes:

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : new()
{
   ...
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
   {
       Type classType = typeof(T);
       ConstructorInfo classConstructor = classType.GetConstructor(new Type[] { listItem.GetType() });
       T classInstance = (T)classConstructor.Invoke(new object[] { listItem });

       tabListItems.Add(classInstance);
   } 
   ...
}

Edit: This answer is deprecated due to .NET 3.5's Activator.CreateInstance, however it is still useful in older .NET versions.

share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't reflection carry a significant performance penalty? –  Daniel Allen Langdon Dec 22 '11 at 16:02
9  
"Significant" would depend upon the application. In most cases, probably not. –  James Jones Jan 6 '12 at 16:34
    
My understanding is that most of the performance hit is in acquiring the ConstructorInfo in the first place. Don't take my word for it without profiling it. If that is the case, simply storing the ConstructorInfo for later reuse could alleviate the performance hit of repeated instantiations through reflection. –  Kelsie Apr 24 '12 at 4:33
8  
I think the lack of compile-time checking is more cause for concern. –  Dave Van den Eynde Jun 11 '12 at 10:58
1  
@James I agree, I was surprised not to see this as the "answer". In fact, I searched on this question expecting to find a nice easy example (like yours) since it's been so long since I've done reflection. Anyway, +1 from me, but +1 on the Activator answer too. I looked into what Activator is doing, and it turns out that what is does is some very well engineered reflection. :) –  Mike Jan 30 '13 at 6:01

Object initializer

If your constructor with the parameter isn't doing anything besides setting a property, you can do this in C# 3 or better using an object initializer rather than calling a constructor (which is impossible, as has been mentioned):

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : new()
{
   ...
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
   {
       tabListItems.Add(new T() { YourPropertyName = listItem } ); // Now using object initializer
   } 
   ...
}

Using this, you can always put any constructor logic in the default (empty) constructor, too.

Activator.CreateInstance()

Alternatively, you could call Activator.CreateInstance() like so:

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : new()
{
   ...
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
   {
        object[] args = new object[] { listItem };
        tabListItems.Add((T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), args)); // Now using Activator.CreateInstance
   } 
   ...
}

Note that Activator.CreateInstance can have some performance overhead that you may want to avoid if execution speed is a top priority and another option is maintainable to you.

share|improve this answer

This will not work in your situation. You can only specify the constraint that it has an empty constructor:

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T: new()

What you could do is use property injection by defining this interface:

public interface ITakesAListItem
{
   ListItem Item { set; }
}

Then you could alter your method to be this:

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : ITakesAListItem, new()
{
   ...
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>();
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection) 
   {
       tabListItems.Add(new T() { Item = listItem });
   } 
   ...
}

The other alternative is the Func method described by JaredPar.

share|improve this answer
    
this would bypass any logic that is in the constructor that takes the arguments though, right? I would like to do something Like Jared's approach but am calling the method internally within the class so don't know what the concrete type is...hmmm –  ChrisCa Nov 5 '09 at 16:21
3  
Right, this calls the logic of the T() default constructor, then simply sets the property "Item". If you're trying to invoke the logic of a non-default constructor, this will not help you. –  Scott Stafford Feb 25 '10 at 15:01

You need to add where T: new() to let the compiler know that T is guaranteed to provide a default constructor.

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T: new()
share|improve this answer
1  
UPDATE: The correct error message is: 'T': cannot provide arguments when creating an instance of a variable –  LB. May 8 '09 at 15:11
    
That's because you're not using a blank constructor, you're passing an argument to it of object. There's no way it can handle that without specifying that the generic Type has a new(object) parameter. –  Min May 8 '09 at 15:14
    
Then you'll need to either: 1. Use reflection 2. Pass the parameter into an initialization method instead of the constructor, where the initialization method belongs to an interface that your type implements and which is included in the where T: ... declaration. Option 1 is the lowest impact for the rest of your code, but option 2 provides compile time checking. –  Richard May 8 '09 at 15:14
    
Don't use reflection! There are other ways as outlined in other answers that get you the same effect. –  Garry Shutler May 8 '09 at 15:17
    
@Garry - I'd agree that reflection isn't necessarily the best approach, but it does allow you to achieve what's required with minimal change to the rest of the code base. That said, I do much prefer the factory delegate approach from @JaredPar. –  Richard May 8 '09 at 15:22

If you simply want to initialise a member field or property with the constructor parameter, in C# >= 3 you can do it very easier:

public static string GetAllItems<T>(...) where T : InterfaceOrBaseClass, new() 
{ 
   ... 
   List<T> tabListItems = new List<T>(); 
   foreach (ListItem listItem in listCollection)  
   { 
       tabListItems.Add(new T{ BaseMemberItem = listItem }); // No error, BaseMemberItem owns to InterfaceOrBaseClass. 
   }  
   ... 
} 

This is the same thing Garry Shutler said, but I'd like to put an aditional note.

Of course you can use a property trick to do more stuff than just setting a field value. A property "set()" can trigger any processing needed to setup its related fields and any other need for the object itself, including a check to see if a full initialization is to take place before the object is used, simulating a full contruction (yes, it is an ugly workaround, but it overcomes M$'s new() limitation).

I can't be assure if it is a planned hole or an accidental side effect, but it works.

It is very funny how M$ people adds new features to the language and seems to not do a full side effects analysis. The entire generic thing is a good evidence of this...

share|improve this answer
1  
Both constraints are needed. InterfaceOrBaseClass makes the compiler aware of the field/property BaseMemberItem. If the "new()" constraint is commented, it will trigger the error: Error 6 Cannot create an instance of the variable type 'T' because it does not have the new() constraint –  fljx Apr 30 '10 at 19:40
    
A situation I encountered wasn't exactly like the question being asked here, however this answer got me where I needed to go and it seems to work very well. –  digitall Aug 12 '10 at 20:59

By the "new() constraint", the compiler means that when you declare the class (or method) with the generic parameter, you need to specify that it has an empty constructor. You can do this like so, for a class:

public class MyClass<T> where T : new()
{

}
share|improve this answer
3  
I think the question was to pass parameter to new! –  Thunder Jul 29 '10 at 4:14

This is kind of mucky, and when I say kind of mucky I may mean revolting, but supposing you can furnish your parameterised type with an empty constructor, then:

public static T GetTInstance<T>() where T: new()
{
    var constructorTypeSignature = new Type[] {typeof (object)};
    var constructorParameters = new object[] {"Create a T"};
    return (T) new T().GetType().GetConstructor(constructorTypeSignature).Invoke(constructorParameters);
}

Will effectively allow you to construct an object from a parameterised type with an argument. In this case I am assuming the constructor I want has a single argument of type object. We create a dummy instance of T using the constraint permitted empty constructor and then use reflection to get one of its other constructors.

share|improve this answer
    
Already answered here stackoverflow.com/a/3054835/661933 by James Jones –  nawfal Apr 23 '13 at 7:52

I believe you have to constraint T with a where statement to only allow objects with a new constructor.

RIght now it accepts anything including objects without it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.