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When I define and call a Function from within a with() statement, the function doesn't receive the object defined in the with(). Is there a way to solve my problem?

For example, this code doesn't work:

var testObj = { testStr: "Hello World!" };
with(testObj) {
  function testFunc(){
     alert(testStr);
  }
  testFunc();
}
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Is there a particular reason you're using with? Not saying it's entirely forbidden of course, but it is generally considered best avoided. –  RightSaidFred Dec 6 '11 at 16:00
    
Not entirely forbidden but forbidden in ECMAScript 5's strict mode. –  jabclab Dec 6 '11 at 16:08
    
@RightSaidFred I need to use jQuery and a set of functions in a Firefox Mobile (Fennec) extension, where the web page is inside an object called "content". BTW aren't you too sexy for stackoverflow? –  benkol Dec 6 '11 at 16:14
    
@benkol: So sexy it hurts... But yeah, it would be better to just use a direct reference to the object somehow, but if you were to use with, you'd want a function expression instead of a declaration. –  RightSaidFred Dec 6 '11 at 16:17
    
FWIW, I ran into this issue while developing a templating engine that uses with so that it can compile the template once then execute it on multiple inputs… And I was hit by this issue. –  David Wolever Jan 17 '12 at 20:48
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's a function declaration.

Functions shouldn't be declared in statement blocks in the first place.

An expression will work:

var testObj = { testStr: "Hello World!" };
with(testObj) {
  var testFunc  = function(){
     alert(testStr);
  }
  testFunc();
}
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Just use a function expression:

var testObj = { testStr: "Hello World!" };
with(testObj) {
  var testFunc = function(){
     alert(testStr);
  };
  testFunc();
}

Function declarations are hoisted so that doesn't work.

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Looks like it's pointing to the testFunc(), and not testObj.

var testObj = { testStr: "Hello World!" };
with(testObj) {
    function testFunc(){
        alert(this == testObj);
    }
    testFunc();
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is likely the global object, and testObj is the object. The issue is with having a function declaration where it shouldn't be. –  RightSaidFred Dec 6 '11 at 15:59
    
Yep, that is the case. –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 6 '11 at 16:00
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Simply don't use with(1):

var testObj = { testStr: "Hello World!" };
(function() {
  alert(testObj.testStr);
}())
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With can be nasty :) –  Jeffrey Sweeney Dec 6 '11 at 15:52
    
Downvote because this doesn't actually answer the question. –  David Wolever Jan 17 '12 at 20:47
    
Yes it does. "Is there a way to solve my problem?" is the question. "Don't do it that way" is a perfectly valid answer to the question. –  jsumners Jan 17 '12 at 21:32
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