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I have with two fields: long nr and a vector of long like below:

public class Pair {

    public long nr;
    public Vector<Long> lines;

    public Pair(long ap, long line){
        this.nr=ap;
        if (line!=0) lines.add(linie);
         else lines=null; 
    }

    public void create (long line){
        nr++;
        lines.add(line);
    }
}

I want to have a function(create) so it modifies the fields of the class. In the main class I have

Pair per1=new Pair(0,0);
Pair per2=new Pair(0,0);

per1.create(3);
per2.create(4);

The constructor works fine, but create doesn't. What is the explanation, and how should the function look like?Thanks a lot.

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According to the code, lines is null when you call create(). Your code should throw a NullPointerException. What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  loscuropresagio Dec 6 '11 at 16:03

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You never created instance of Vector by calling new Vector<Long>() in your code. Moreover you are setting your class variable lines to null if line == 0.

Your code should like this:

public class Pair {

public long nr;
public Vector<Long> lines = new Vector<long>();

public  Pair(long ap, long line){
    this.nr=ap;
    if (line!=0) lines.add(linie);
}

public void create (long line){
    nr++;
    if (line!=0) lines.add(linie);
}

}
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Two problems:

  • Your constructor will never work for non-zero values; it will throw a null pointer exception. This is because you never initialize lines. You will need to initialize it either when you define it as a member or in the constructor (as lines = new Vector<Long>();)

  • You will always get a null pointer exception because you set the variable lines to null when you call your constructor with the line argument as 0. When you subsequently call create, you will get a null pointer exception when lines.add(line) is run.

To fix your problems I would do something like this:

lines = new Vector<Long>();

if(line != 0) {
   lines.add(line);
}

Notice there's no else. I'm not sure why you need to set lines to null, but realize that if you do, you won't be able to use it later. It's also a pretty weird side-effect that is bound to cause confusion to the users of your class.

A few other pointers.

  • Please use proper Java syntax and naming conventions. Always surround your if's and else's with braces:

    if(line != 0) { lines.add(line); } else { ... }

    • Use descriptive variable names. nr and ap aren't very clear.
    • Do nr and lines really need to be public? That is the exception rather than the rule.
share|improve this answer
    
Constructor is working because he never calls it with anything but 0. –  Stefan Dec 6 '11 at 16:02
    
@Stefan Good point - will fix. –  Vivin Paliath Dec 6 '11 at 16:04

The line in the constructor sets your Vector to null, so you cant add to it later.

if (line!=0) lines.add(linie);
        else lines=null; // <-- cant call add later on lines

Btw it wouldnt even work if you call your constructor with any other parameter, since you never initialize your lines Vector at all.

I dont know what you exactly try to do but you can change your field definition to

public Vector<Long> lines = new Vector<Long>();

And then remove the else in your contructor.

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Your lines vector is never initialised. Calling your constructor with a value other than 0 is also going to throw a NullPointerException.

You can either change the field declaration to Vector<Long> lines = new Vector<Long>(); or call lines = new Vector<Long>(); at the beginning of your constructor, and simply do nothing if the value of the second argument is 0.

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First off, I'm not sure the name of class matches the behavior. Names like nr make working with code very difficult. Consider renaming that to something more meaningful.

The key is that you never create a Vector object, only references.

so I would make your constructor do this:

public  Pair(long ap, long line){
    this.nr=ap;
    lines = new Vector<Long>();
    if (line!=0) lines.add(line);
}
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The constructor for lines is missing.

Either in the definition of lines or in the constructor of Pair you have to initialise lines:

lines = new Vector<Long>();
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