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Question:

In python, list.index(a) will return any index for which a == list[index] is true. But I need to find the index for which a is list[index], and do so as quickly as possible (speed is vital). How would I go about doing so?

Background:

Maybe I am going about programming the wrong way. Just in case, here is the issue for which I need a solution to the above question:

I have some text in which I must be able to insert/remove characters very quickly. Therefore, I use a list of the characters (about a million) instead of a string.

Also, after any given insert/remove operation at an index, I must very quickly know how many newline characters precede that index. I have tried list[0:index].count(newline), but it is to slow. So I am trying to a second approach using the solution to the above question.

Of course, maybe this approach of working it out after every operation is too slow by definition. But I can't think of any fast way to maintain the information (for lookup, so I don't have to work it out every time) given that the indexes and amount of newlines can change every time I insert/remove a character.

Edit:

Here is approximately my solution until now. Using cProfile, I find it to take maybe 1/50 the time of doing chars[0:index].count(), but still not fast enough:

#Initialized once, and then maintained after every change.
chars = [['\n'],['a'],['b'],['\n'],.... ]
newlines = [newline for newline in chars if newline == ['\n']]

#called every time I need the count of newlines preceding 'index'
def newlinecount(index):

    #find closest preceding newline
    previousNewlineIndex = index
    while not chars[previousNewlineIndex ] == ['\n']:
        previousNewlineIndex -= 1
    previousNewline = chars[previousNewlineIndex]

    #find position of 'previousNewline' in 'newlines', and thus newlinecount
    for count, newline in enumerate(newlines):
        if newline is previousNewline:
            return count + 1 #(add 1 because 'count' starts from 0)

Thanks!

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Surely if it is a list of characters and you want to find newlines you want the default behaviour of index: you want to find characters that are equal to newline not identical to a specific newline. Anyway you aren't going to beat list.count() with a loop coded in Python. –  Duncan Dec 6 '11 at 16:43
    
'and you want to find newlines' Apologies if I wasn't clear. I need to find out HOW MANY newlines are preceding the position in the list. Also, yes, I can beat list.count(), I've done it (Sorry, I'll post that code in the next few minutes)! Just not fast enough yet... –  Jeff Dec 6 '11 at 16:56
    
Inserting/removing values in the middle of a list is not fast. It requires moving all the data that follows the insertion index. –  interjay Dec 6 '11 at 16:58
    
Oh yes, sorry, I overlooked that you are slicing the string before calling count. In that case you almost certainly can do something faster if you avoid the slice. However, avoiding the massive list would be a much better approach. –  Duncan Dec 6 '11 at 17:08
1  
@Jeff: There is no such thing as "slow", there is only "fast enough". String concatenation is not "extremely" slow at all, creating unnecessary temporary strings is (e.g. "a" + "b" + "c" creates an intermediate "ab"). If you measure it with timeit, you will find that L[0:500] + L[501:] is about 16x faster for strings than for integer lists! –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 7 '11 at 8:52
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3 Answers

Not sure I followed through correctly, but what about treating your text as a series of lines?

If you stored your 1Mb text as a list of strings (one string per line) you would handle insert/replaces very quickly (the string would be short) and you could use the index of your list to keep track of how many newline characters are preceding / following a given point of your text.

Does this help in any way, or did I misinterpreted what you are trying to do?

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+1: Nice suggestion. –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 6 '11 at 17:12
    
Its a good idea, but I need to be able to copy and paste sections of the text. As is, I just move a slice of the list around. But once I do it your way, I'd have to slice the main list and then the string (the line) and then remerge the two somewhere else in the text... its gets complicated. But maybe its the only solution... –  Jeff Dec 6 '11 at 17:16
    
@Jeff - Not sure I understood your comment, but you should keep on just slicing the "main list", when operating on a subset of the text. Since strings are immutable, it's probably easier (and cheaper) to replace the entire line at once. But maybe I did not understand your comment? –  mac Dec 6 '11 at 17:23
    
Apologies. Take for example '\nab\ncd'. I want to move 'b\nd' to the end. Say I do it my way, list = ['\n', 'a', 'b', '\n', 'c', 'd'] so I just do list = list[0:2] + list[5] + list[2:5] or something similar. Simple slicing and splicing! And we have (in list form) '\nadb\nc' But take your way: ['\nab','\ncd'] to ['\nadb', '\nc'] and now how do I accomplish it? Looks complicated! –  Jeff Dec 6 '11 at 17:29
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@Jeff - I might be totally wrong on this (I never tried anything like that). But it seems to me that if you are doing that type of program you should probably use a tree structure you can manipulate the nodes of, rather than a flat string. The GoF book is all about desing patterns for a text editor, BTW. So it might be a good reading if you are interested in sw design... –  mac Dec 7 '11 at 8:45
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I think, what you might need, is to maintain two separate data structure:

  • char_list: the list of characters itself. the operation on this will be
  • index_list: an other sorted list, which contains the positions (indexes) of the newline characters

Your insert and remove operations will operate on both data structures. When you insert/remove a char you will increment/decrement the appropriate elements in the index_list. After that index_list.index(new_char_index) will return number of newlines before the inserted/removed char

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I suppose its a possibility, but wouldn't it be far slower? If I insert a character near the begining, I'd have to increment upwards of some 50,000 newline indices. –  Jeff Dec 6 '11 at 17:17
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In python, list.index(a) will return any index for which a == list[index] is true. But I need to find the index for which a is list[index], and do so as quickly as possible (speed is vital).

Even if list.index() worked that way, you wouldn't get much benefit from that. Since there is no character type in Python, you should store your characters as integers, not as one-character strings. Integers are compared the same way for == and is.

I have some text in which I must be able to insert/remove characters very quickly. Therefore, I use a list of the characters (about a million) instead of a string.

Storing characters in a list is not a way to allow for fast insertions and deletions. A Python list is a dynamic array, not a linked list, so that adding or removing items is O(n). For example, if you want to remove the 5 in range(10), items 6 to 9 need to be moved to the left by one position.

Also, after any given insert/remove operation at an index, I must very quickly know how many newline characters precede that index.

I would suggest that you keep the indices of newline characters in a separate data structure, and update this every time you add or remove a newline character. Otherwise you will always have to scan the entire list up to the current point.

Due to Python beeing a very high-level language, I doubt that you can get really good performance for your problem in plain Python, though.

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'I would suggest that you keep the indices of newline characters in a separate data structure...' Wouldn't this require me to edit some 50,000 indices every time a character gets inserted/deleted? Also, I appreciate your'e idea of a linked list. How would I do this in python? And secondly, could I still use indexes? –  Jeff Dec 6 '11 at 17:11
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Forget the lists. In Python, you get speed by delegating the heavy lifting to routines written in C. A Python string is a C array of bytes, and its methods work directly on the data. Therefore, they are way faster than lists, which are general purpose data structures and work on (pointers to) arbitrary Python objects. '\n' in str can loop over single characters and do the comparison in C, '\n' in list needs to check every object type in the list and look for appropriate comparison methods! –  Ferdinand Beyer Dec 7 '11 at 9:05
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