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I'm making an arraylist of numbers, appropriately

private ArrayList<Integer> numbers = new ArrayList();

and I have to check if they're all unique. So I have this code:

public boolean isUnique()
{
    ArrayList<Integer> checkNumbers = new ArrayList();

    for(int i = 1; i<=numbers.size(); i++)
    {
        if(numbers.contains(i) && !checkNumbers.contains(i))
        {
            checkNumbers.add(i);
            return true;
        }           
    }

    return false;
}

The idea is, I have to take in a square number (n) of integer inputs, unique from 1 to n.

But no matter what I add to numbers (13 2 13 2), it always returns true.

What's wrong with my logic here?

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1  
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/562894/… –  Beau Grantham Dec 6 '11 at 16:49
2  
Is i actually the number that you want to check is in the list numbers? i is going to be 1,2,3,4... to the size of numbers, not the values in numbers itself. –  ben_w Dec 6 '11 at 16:51
    
@ben_w it is. I have to take in a square number (n) of integer inputs, unique from 1 to n. –  novalsi Dec 6 '11 at 16:56
    
@novalsi please edit your question with these additional details, so people can change their responses if needed –  Beau Grantham Dec 6 '11 at 16:58
    
@BeauGrantham just did. at bottom. thanks. –  novalsi Dec 6 '11 at 17:00

8 Answers 8

up vote 2 down vote accepted

if the list can contain more numbers than n and all you want is to verify that 1 .. n all exist and without duplication, then your code should be modified to this:

public boolean isUnique()
{
    ArrayList<Integer> checkNumbers = new ArrayList();

    for(int i = 1; i<=numbers.size(); i++)
    {
        if(numbers.contains(i))
        {
           if (!checkNumbers.contains(i)) 
             checkNumbers.add(i);
           else 
            return false; 
        }
        else{
            return false;
        }           
    }

    return true;
}

if on the other hand the list can't contain more than n elements, you don't need the other list at all:

public boolean isUnique()
    {

     if (numbers.size()<n)
        return false;  

        for(int i = 1; i<=numbers.size(); i++)
        {
            if(!numbers.contains(i))
              return false; 

        }

        return true;
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
PERFECT! Thank you, I see what you've done. This is excellent. I used the first snippet, because I have to allow user input until the user breaks it, then I have to count however many they've put in. –  novalsi Dec 6 '11 at 19:20

You need to iterate the content of numbers, not their indexes.

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sorry, edited to reflect that i do in fact need their indices. –  novalsi Dec 6 '11 at 17:05

You are checking if the list contains a value equal to the indexes, not numbers in the list. You need to get() the value at the index (or use a foreach loop).

You also have a return statement right after you add a number to checkNumbers, so the list will go out of scope immediately after you add the first number to it. Therefore, it will never contain a number when you do the if evaluation.

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checkNumbers is always empty to begin with, so the first time it finds a value of i that's in your list, it's going to add that number to checkNumbers and then return true.

I'd inverse the logic - the first time it finds a number that's in the list AND in checkNumbers, return false. If that never happens, return true.

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The reason for your method returning true is that you create your checkNumbers inside it, so it's empty. It does not matter what you put into numbers - it will not be found in checkNumbers, add it and return with true.

Try istantiating your checkNumbers with a number.

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You create a new array;

ArrayList<Integer> checkNumbers = new ArrayList();

and then in the loop you do this;

if (numbers.contains(i) && !checkNumbers.contains(i))
{
   checkNumbers.add(i);
   return true;
} 

!checkNumbers.contains(i) will always be true; you just created it; its empty. So the first time numbers.contains(i) is true the method will return true.

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The problem is you compare index instead the value at the index :).

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The problem in your method is that your checking whether or not each value of i is in the ArrayList. What you have to do is use the get(), so you have to do this:

public boolean isUnique()
{
    ArrayList<Integer> checkNumbers = new ArrayList();

    for(int i = 1; i<=numbers.size(); i++)
    {
        if(numbers.contains(checkNumbers.get(i)) && !checkNumbers.contains(numbers.get(i)))
        {
            checkNumbers.add(i);
            return true;
        }           
    }

    return false;
}
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