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In my project, I have a function in postgres (plpgsql) that determines country from a given ip address:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_country_for_ip(character varying)
  RETURNS character varying AS
$BODY$
declare
    ip  ALIAS for $1;
    ccode   varchar;
    cparts  varchar[];
    nparts  bigint[];
    addr    bigint;
begin
    cparts := string_to_array(ip, '.');
    if array_upper(cparts, 1) <> 4 then
        raise exception 'gcfi01: Invalid IP address: %', ip;
    end if;
    nparts := array[a2i(cparts[1])::bigint, a2i(cparts[2])::bigint, a2i(cparts[3])::bigint, a2i(cparts[4])::bigint];
    if(nparts[1] is null or nparts[1] < 0 or nparts[1] > 255 or
       nparts[2] is null or nparts[2] < 0 or nparts[2] > 255 or
       nparts[3] is null or nparts[3] < 0 or nparts[3] > 255 or
       nparts[4] is null or nparts[4] < 0 or nparts[4] > 255) then
        raise exception 'gcfi02: Invalid IP address: %', ip;
    end if;

    addr := (nparts[1] << 24) | (nparts[2] << 16) | (nparts[3] << 8) | nparts[4];
    addr := nparts[1] * 256 * 65536 + nparts[2] * 65536 + nparts[3] * 256 + nparts[4];

    select into ccode t_country_code from ip_to_country where addr between n_from and n_to limit 1;
    if ccode is null then
        ccode := '';
    end if;
    return ccode;
end;$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE
  COST 100;

This may not be the most efficient, but it does the job. Note that it uses an internal table (ip_to_country), which contains data as below (the numbers n_from and n_to are the long values of the start and end of address ranges:

  n_from  |   n_to   | t_country_code 
----------+----------+----------------
        0 | 16777215 | ZZ
 16777216 | 16777471 | AU
...

Now we are starting to look at the IPv6 addressing as well - and I need to add similar functionality for IPv6 addresses. I have a similar set of data for IPv6, which looks like this:

 t_start     | t_end                                   | t_country_code
-------------+-----------------------------------------+----------------
 ::          | ff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff   | ZZ
 100::       | 1ff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff  | ZZ
...
 2000::      | 2000:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff | ZZ
...
 2001:1200:: | 2001:1200:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff | MX
...

Now, given an IP address ::1, how do I (1) check that it's a valid IPv6 address and (2) get the corresponding country mapping?

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Are you sure IPv6 is going to be mapped in a similar manner to IPv4? There is enough IPv6 addresses for the earth's entire population and then some. Your mapping technique seems like it wouldn't be valid if ip addresses is repuprosed. What is your data source? There are regular expressions that can help you validate if a IPv6 is valid or not. –  Ramhound Dec 6 '11 at 17:53
    
@Ramhound: We're using information from Webnet77 (webnet77.com) It has served us well for IPv4, so we started with their database for IPv6. I'm not too worried about being correct 100% of the time (for now), but need to get started somewhere. –  Aleks G Dec 6 '11 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

First, I see a couple things you are doing that will pose problems. The first is this use of varchar and long to represent IP addresses when PostgreSQL has perfectly valid INET and CIDR types that will do what you want only better and faster. Note these do not support GIN indexing properly at present so you can't do exclude constraints on them. If you need that, look at the ip4r extension which does support this.

Note as a patch for now you can cast your varchar to inet. Inet also supports both ipv4 and ipv6 addresses as does cidr, and similar types exist on ip4r.

This will solve the ipv6 validation issue for you, and likely cut down on your storage as well as provide better operational checks and better performance.

As for countries, I am also thinking that the mappings may not be so straight-forward.

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Thanks for the answer, however this is not in the least amount helpful. There are valid reasons why the implementation is the way it is, notwithstanding the fact that it needs to be cross-database, working in postgres and mysql at the minimum; details are different, but the datatypes are the same. I did not ask to comment on my implementation, I asked specifically about dealing with ipv6 - and all you said is "I am thinking that the mappings may not be so straight-forward". That's not an answer, that's a comment. –  Aleks G Mar 21 '13 at 13:24
    
At least we got the question closed out, right? However pl/pgsql is not going to work on MySQL so once you go that route, I think you really do want to go with the inet types. Plus they solve your validation problem. If nothing else you can simply caste to the type and run functions from varchar. –  Chris Travers Mar 21 '13 at 14:50
    
@Aleks G: If you require answers to be restricted so they work/are easily converted to MySQL, then do that in your question. Not in the comments and certainly not after people have wasted time trying to answer a Postgres question, while you want a cross-database solution. –  ypercube Mar 21 '13 at 15:01
    
@ypercube You seem to have misunderstood me. The main issue here is that you are not answering the question, you are commenting on something that I'm not asking about. –  Aleks G Mar 21 '13 at 17:44
    
@AleksG You asked how to validate ipv6 addresses. I suggested using a type for that. How is that not answering? –  Chris Travers Mar 22 '13 at 0:46
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I believe I found the solution. It involves modifying the data first and then some massaging of the input. Here's what worked.

First, the data needs to be converted so that all addresses are full, without shortening, with semicolon separators removed. The sample data shown in my question is converted to:

 t_start                          | t_end                            | t_country_code
----------------------------------+----------------------------------+----------------
 00000000000000000000000000000000 | 00ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff | ZZ
 01000000000000000000000000000000 | 01ffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff | ZZ
...
 20000000000000000000000000000000 | 2000ffffffffffffffffffffffffffff | ZZ
...
 20011200000000000000000000000000 | 20011200ffffffffffffffffffffffff | MX
...

This is what is stored in the database.

The next step was to convert the IP address received in the code to be in the same format. This is done in PHP with the following code (assume that $ip_address is the incoming IPv6 address):

$addr_bin = inet_pton($ip_address);                                                                                                              
$bytes = unpack('n*', $addr_bin);
$ip_address = implode('', array_map(function ($b) {return sprintf("%04x", $b); }, $bytes));

Now variable $ip_adress wil contain the full IPv6 address, for example

:: => 00000000000000000000000000000000
2001:1200::ab => 200112000000000000000000000000ab

and so on.

Now you can simply compare this full address with the ranges in the database. I added a second function to the database to deal with IPv6 addresses, which looks like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION get_country_for_ipv6(character varying)
  RETURNS character varying AS
$BODY$
declare
    ip  ALIAS for $1;
    ccode   varchar;
begin
    select into ccode t_country_code from ipv6_to_country where addr between n_from and n_to limit 1;
    if ccode is null then
        ccode := '';
    end if;
    return ccode;
end;$BODY$
  LANGUAGE plpgsql VOLATILE
  COST 100;

Finally, in my php code I added the code that calls one or the other Postgres function based on the input ip_address.

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