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Very simple question: is there a smart way of creating a subvector from regularly spaced elements of another vector with the STL?

In short, is it possible to write the following code with a STL algorithm:

int inc = 2;
std::vector<double> v_origin;
std::vector<double> v_dest;

for (int i = 0; i < v_origin.size(); i+= inc)
    v_dest.push_back(v_origin[i]);

Like I would write in Matlab or Python something like:

v_dest = v_origin[0:inc:end];
share|improve this question
    
No, there is no way to do that. There may be more performant ways of filling the destination vector (pre-allocated size?, std::copy) but as far as I know, no direct way of accomplishing what you want. –  Unapiedra Dec 6 '11 at 18:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As a general solution, you could define a stride iterator. If you use Boost.Range, then it already as a strided range adaptor.

Example:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/range/adaptors.hpp>
#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>

int main()
{
    int inc = 2;
    std::vector<double> v_origin;
    std::vector<double> v_dest;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++ i)
        v_origin.push_back(i);

    boost::copy(v_origin | boost::adaptors::strided(2),
                std::back_inserter(v_dest));
    // ^ In Python:    v_dest[] = v_origin[::2]

    boost::copy(v_dest, std::ostream_iterator<double>(std::cout, ", "));
}
share|improve this answer

(Creating another answer as it's a different approach.)

If you just want to push_back a strided slice of another container, and does not intend to use that lst[a:b:c] concept anywhere else, it is probably easier to write a generic copy-like function:

template <typename InputIterator, typename OutputIterator>
void copy_strided(InputIterator begin, InputIterator end,
                  OutputIterator result, size_t stride)
{
   assert(stride >= 1);

   for (size_t i = stride; begin != end; ++ i, ++ begin)
   {
      if (i == stride)
      {
         *result = *begin;
         ++ result;
         i = 0;
      }
   }
}

Usage:

#include <vector>
#include <cassert>
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
    int inc = 2;
    std::vector<double> v_origin;
    std::vector<double> v_dest;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++ i)
        v_origin.push_back(i);

    copy_strided(v_origin.begin(), v_origin.end(), std::back_inserter(v_dest), inc);

    std::copy(v_dest.begin(), v_dest.end(), std::ostream_iterator<double>(std::cout, ", "));
}
share|improve this answer
struct RemoveNth
{
    RemoveNth(int incin)
    {
        count = 0;
        inc = incin;
    }

    bool operator()(double x )
    {
        return count++ % inc == 0;
    }

    int count;
    int inc;
};

int main()
{

    int inc = 2;
    std::vector<double> v_origin;
    std::vector<double> v_dest;

    for ( int i = 0 ; i < 100; ++i )
        v_origin.push_back( i );

    v_dest  = v_origin;
    RemoveNth helper(3);
    std::vector<double>::iterator newend = 
         std::remove_if (v_dest.begin() , v_dest.end(), helper); 
    v_dest.erase( newend , v_dest.end() );

    return 0;
}

Something like above might work.

In C++11 you can use std::copy_if and instead of the separate functor you can use inline lambdas like so

template<typename T, typename U>
void copynth( T begin , T end , U dest , int n )
{
    int count = 0;
    std::copy_if( begin , end , dest ,
        [&count,n]( double x )
    {
        return count++ % n == 0;
    });
}

int main()
{

    int inc = 2;
    std::vector<double> v_origin;
    std::vector<double> v_dest;

    for ( int i = 0 ; i < 100; ++i )
        v_origin.push_back( i );

    int count = 0;
    copynth( v_origin.begin() , v_origin.end() , std::back_inserter(v_dest) , 4);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

There does not exist anything in the standard library that is meant for this task specifically.

Below is my own generic implementation. There is a separate implementation for random access iterator and for other input iterators.

#include <iterator>

namespace detail {
template <class SourceIter, class OutIter>
void strided_copy_aux(SourceIter from, SourceIter to, OutIter out, unsigned step, std::random_access_iterator_tag)
{
    SourceIter end = (to - from) / step * step + from;
    for (; from < end; from += step ) {
        *out = *from;
    }
    if (end < to) {
        *out = *end;
    }
}

template <class SourceIter, class OutIter>
void strided_copy_aux(SourceIter from, SourceIter to, OutIter out, unsigned step, std::input_iterator_tag)
{
    while (from != to) {
        *out = *from;
        for (unsigned i = 0; i != step; ++i) {
            ++from;
            if (from == to) break;
        }
    }
}
}

template <class SourceIter, class OutIter>
void strided_copy(SourceIter from, SourceIter to, OutIter out, unsigned step)
{
    detail::strided_copy_aux(from, to, out, step, typename std::iterator_traits<SourceIter>::iterator_category());
}

Usage example: http://ideone.com/1Wmq3

share|improve this answer
    
Why not use advance on the iterator and provide one implemenation?? –  parapura rajkumar Dec 6 '11 at 19:33
    
@parapurarajkumar: You can't advance a random access iterator by, say 5, if you don't know it won't go beyond the end iterator. On the other hand, you can't calculate the number of advances to be made with other types of iterators. (With input iterators, the latter would be completely impossible.) –  UncleBens Dec 6 '11 at 19:46
int offset = 0;
vector<double> v_dest(v_origin.begin() + offset, v_origin.end()); // for initilizing.


// if default constrcuted

copy(v_origin.begin(),v_origin.end(),back_inserter(v_dest));


// if already exists , 

v_dest.insert(v_dest.end(),v_origin.begin(),v_origin.end());

//copy on a predicate

copy_if(v_origin.begin(),v_origin.end(),back_inserter(v_dest),Pred);

Pred could be a simple lambda that calculated the distance of the current iterator from the begin , and a mod of say 2 as in returning distance%2 == 0 would copy the even elements, returning distance%2 !=0 would copy the odd elements...

share|improve this answer
    
The question is how to copy every n-th (2nd, 3rd etc) element. –  UncleBens Dec 6 '11 at 18:32
    
I would probably use v_dest.assign over copy( –  Mooing Duck Dec 6 '11 at 18:32
    
@UncleBens added copy_if which will do just that with an inventive predicate. –  johnathon Dec 6 '11 at 18:40

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