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I've got something along the lines of the following:

public class A { 
    public void theMethod(Object arg1) {
        // do some stuff with a single argument
    }
}

public class B {
    public void reflectingMethod(Object arg) {
        Method method = A.class.getMethod("theMethod", Object.class);
        method.invoke(new A(), arg);
    }
}

How do I modify that so that I can do the following instead?

public class A { 
    public void theMethod(Object... args) {
        // do some stuff with a list of arguments
    }
}

public class B {
    public void reflectingMethod(Object... args) {
        Method method = A.class.getMethod("theMethod", /* what goes here ? */);
        method.invoke(new A(), args);
    }
}
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Have you tried List<Object>? –  Darthenius Dec 6 '11 at 18:48
    
That worked. I'd tried it before but gotten stumped at how to get the class for List<Object>, since ".class" isn't allowed on generics. Creating a new empty arraylist works though (as long as the method signatures use ArrayList<Object> for the arguments. –  James McMurray Dec 6 '11 at 19:18
    
@Darthenius, well a List is not really a varargs :-) btw, James, you should be able to look up the method (with List) by doing List.class I guess... –  aishwarya Dec 6 '11 at 20:06
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2 Answers

A.class.getMethod("theMethod", Object[].class);
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All classes extends Object –  Garrett Hall Dec 6 '11 at 18:49
    
It's the callee you're looking for ... not a particular caller. –  Andy Thomas Dec 6 '11 at 18:49
    
With reflection, the method that is returned is the one with a matching method name and parameters. In this case, the method name is theMethod and the parameters is an object array. If you pass invoke different subclasses classes of Object it will not care. –  Ransom Briggs Dec 6 '11 at 18:54
    
Object[].class caused an exception when trying to invoke the reflected method if I passed in more than one item in the array. For instance a String[] of {"a", "b", "c"} complained that there were too many arguments (it expected 1 but got three). –  James McMurray Dec 6 '11 at 19:19
    
I'll move this to an answer once the system will let m: Darthenius's suggestion in the comments for the original question worked, once I wrapped my head around how to do it. public class A { public void theMethod(ArrayList<Object> args) { // do stuff } } public class B { public void reflectingMethod(ArrayList<Object> args) { Method method; try { method = A.class.getMethod("theMethod", args.getClass()); method.invoke(new A(), args); } catch (Exception e) { } } } –  James McMurray Dec 6 '11 at 19:23
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Darthenius's suggestion in the comments for the original question worked, once I wrapped my head around how to do it.

public class A {
    public void theMethod(ArrayList<Object> args) { // do stuff 
    }
}

public class B {
    public void reflectingMethod(ArrayList<Object> args) {
        Method method;
        try {
            method = A.class.getMethod("theMethod", args.getClass());
            method.invoke(new A(), args);
        } catch (Exception e) {}
    }
}
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