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I have a program that spawns lots of children and runs for long periods of time. The program contains a SIGCHLD handler to reap defunct processes. Occasionally, this program freezes. I believe that pstack is indicating a deadlock scenario. Is that the proper interpretation of this output?

10533:  ./asyncsignalhandler
 ff3954e4 lwp_park (0, 0, 0)
 ff391bbc slow_lock (ff341688, ff350000, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 58
 ff2c45c8 localtime_r (ffbfe7a0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 24
 ff2ba39c __posix_ctime_r (ffbfe7a0, ffbfe80e, ffbfe7a0, 0, 0, 0) + c
 00010bd8 gettimestamp (ffbfe80e, ffbfe828, 40, 0, 0, 0) + 18
 00010c50 sig_chld (12, 0, ffbfe9f0, 0, 0, 0) + 30
 ff3956fc __sighndlr (12, 0, ffbfe9f0, 10c20, 0, 0) + c
 ff38f354 call_user_handler (12, 0, ffbfe9f0, 0, 0, 0) + 234
 ff38f504 sigacthandler (12, 0, ffbfe9f0, 0, 0, 0) + 64
 --- called from signal handler with signal 18 (SIGCLD) ---
 ff391c14 pthread_mutex_lock (20fc8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 48
 ff2bcdec getenv   (ff32a9ac, 770d0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 1c
 ff2c6f40 getsystemTZ (0, 79268, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 14
 ff2c4da8 ltzset_u (4ede65ba, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 14
 ff2c45d0 localtime_r (ffbff378, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 2c
 ff2ba39c __posix_ctime_r (ffbff378, ffbff402, ffbff378, ff33e000, 0, 0) + c
 00010bd8 gettimestamp (ffbff402, ffbff402, 2925, 29a7, 79c38, 10b54) + 18
 00010ae0 main     (1, ffbff4ac, ffbff4b4, 20c00, 0, 0) + 190
 00010928 _start   (0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0) + 108

I don't really fancy myself a C coder and am not familiar with the nuances of the language. I'm specifically using the re-entrant version of ctime(_r) in the program. Why is this still deadlocking?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#include <time.h>

// import pid_t type
#include <sys/types.h>

// import _exit function
#include <unistd.h>

// import WNOHANG definition
#include <sys/wait.h>

// import errno variable
#include <errno.h>

// header for signal functions
#include <signal.h>

// function prototypes
void sig_chld(int);
char * gettimestamp(char *);

// begin
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
   time_t   sleepstart;
   time_t   sleepcheck;
   pid_t    childpid;
   int i;
   unsigned int sleeptime;
   char sleepcommand[20];
   char ctime_buf[26];

   struct sigaction act;

   /* set stdout to line buffered for logging purposes */
   setvbuf(stdout, NULL, _IOLBF, BUFSIZ);

   /* Assign sig_chld as our SIGCHLD handler */
   act.sa_handler = sig_chld;

   /* We don't want to block any other signals */
   sigemptyset(&act.sa_mask);

   /*
    * We're only interested in children that have terminated, not ones
    * which have been stopped (eg user pressing control-Z at terminal)
    */
   act.sa_flags = SA_NOCLDSTOP;

   /* Make these values effective. */
   if (sigaction(SIGCHLD, &act, NULL) < 0) 
   {
      printf("sigaction failed\n");
      return 1;
   }

   while (1) {
      for (i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
         /*   fork/exec child program                                */
         childpid = fork();
         if (childpid == 0) // child
         {
            //sleeptime = 30 + i;
            sprintf(sleepcommand, "sleep %d", i);

            printf("\t[%s][%d] Executing /bin/sh -c %s\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid(), sleepcommand);

            execl("/bin/sh", "/bin/sh", "-c", sleepcommand, NULL);

            // only executed if exec fails
            printf("[%s][%d] Error executing program, errno: %d\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid(), errno);
            _exit(1);
         }
         else if (childpid < 0) // error
         {
            printf("[%s][%d] Error forking, errno: %d\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid(), errno);
         }
         else // parent
         {
            printf("[%s][%d] Spawned child, pid: %d\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid(), childpid);
         }
      }

      // sleep is interrupted by SIGCHLD, so we can't simply sleep(5)
      printf("[%s][%d] Sleeping for 5 seconds\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid());
      time(&sleepstart);
      while (1) {
         time(&sleepcheck);
         if (difftime(sleepcheck, sleepstart) < 5) {
            sleep(1);
         } else {
            break;
         }
      }
   }


   return(0);
}

char * gettimestamp(char *ctime_buf)
{
   time_t now;

   time(&now);

   // format the timestamp and chomp the newline
   ctime_r(&now, ctime_buf);
   ctime_buf[strlen(ctime_buf) - 1] = '\0';

   return ctime_buf;
}

/*
 * The signal handler function -- only gets called when a SIGCHLD
 * is received, ie when a child terminates.
 */
void sig_chld(int signo)
{
   pid_t childpid;
   int childexitstatus;
   char ctime_buf[26];

   while (1) {
      childpid = waitpid(-1, &childexitstatus, WNOHANG);
      if (childpid > 0)
         printf("[%s][%d] Reaped child, pid: %d, exitstatus: %d\n", gettimestamp(ctime_buf), getpid(), childpid, WEXITSTATUS(childexitstatus));
      else
         return;
   }
}

I'm running in a Solaris 9 environment. The program was compiled with Sun WorkShop 6 update 2 C 5.3 Patch 111679-15 2009/09/10 using the following syntax:

cc -o asyncsignalhandler asyncsignalhandler.c -mt -D_POSIX_PTHREAD_SEMANTICS

Is there a flaw in the program? Are there better ways to handle logging (with timestamps) from a signal handler?

share|improve this question
    
printf is not async-signal-safe, so you shouldn't be using that inside a signal handler ... use write instead using fileno(stdout). –  Jason Dec 6 '11 at 19:51
    
While I'll concede that printf() may be a problem, that's not what the stack trace is telling me. How do you arrive at printf() as being the source of the deadlock? –  user255205 Dec 6 '11 at 20:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are calling functions that are not async-signal-safe (see section 2.4.3 of the unix spec) from within a signal handler - in this case, ctime_r() and printf() (the deadlock appears to be happening due to a lock used by ctime_r() in the stacktrace you show). These functions may take locks, and since a signal handler may be invoked at any moment, the lock may already be held, resulting in a deadlock.

Generally, in a signal handler, all you should so is make a note for the main thread to examine later. For example, you could write() (which is an async-signal-safe function) to a pipe()-created file descriptor, and have your main loop (or another thread) doing a select loop to wait for some data to show up on that pipe.

Note also that thread-safe is not the same as async-signal-safe. ctime_r is thread safe - it takes locks to ensure threads don't step on each other, and it uses a passed-in buffer rather than a static buffer. But it's not async-signal-safe, because it can't tolerate being called reentrantly at any arbitrary point in its execution.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not calling localtime(). I'm calling ctime_r() which in turn is calling localtime_r() per the stack trace. –  user255205 Dec 6 '11 at 19:57
    
Ah, oops. But same thing - ctime_r() is not listed as async-signal-safe. –  bdonlan Dec 6 '11 at 20:03
    
ctime_r() is explicitly re-entrant. Which I thought was the highest order of thread safety? Being re-entrant does not make it async-signal-safe? –  user255205 Dec 6 '11 at 20:10
    
That is correct. async-signal-safe is a much higher bar to pass than just thread-safe (aka 'reentrant'). –  bdonlan Dec 6 '11 at 20:11
1  
Really, reentrant is a very bad name for *_r functions. Usually the only guarantee they make is not to use static storage, but they may use non-reentrant locking internally. –  ninjalj Dec 6 '11 at 21:07

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