Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having trouble with an example that I am compiling from my C++ All-In-One For Dummies, Second Edition. What it should do is display 10 lines of code containing CR(somenumbers)NQ; However every time I run I get 10 variable addresses. I tried to search the web for this issue but it's pretty particular. I'm running Linux openSUSE 12.1 and using Code::Blocks (GCC). I'm beginning to think there might be a library issue with the included append function. Either that or I'm completely blind and its really obvious.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <cstdlib>

using namespace std;


string *getSecertCode()
{
    string *code = new string;
    code->append("CR");
    int randomNumber = rand();
    ostringstream converter;
    converter << randomNumber;

        code->append(converter.str());
    code->append("NQ");

    return code;
}

int main()
{
    string *newcode;
    int index;
    for (index =0; index < 10; index++)
    {
        newcode = getSecertCode();
        cout << newcode << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Unless this was an example demonstrating bad C++ on purpose, consider a different textbook –  Cubbi Dec 6 '11 at 21:15
    
It unfortunately was an bad textbook example. It also didn't include <cstdlib> for use of rand(). The rest of the book has been relatively spot on though. But thanks for the suggestion. –  Wylie Coyote SG. Dec 6 '11 at 21:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem seems to be

cout << newcode << endl;

since "newcode" is a string* and not a string.

Try

cout << *newcode << endl;

instead.

And as you say you are a beginner: don't forget to delete the memory you are allocating (new!).

share|improve this answer
    
That fixed it! Looks like It was me just being blind. I looked over this code for at least 10 mins looking for a typo. Sorry I didnt catch that. So I'm new to stackoverflow. DO I remove this question now that its been resolved? (especially because it was my fault?) –  Wylie Coyote SG. Dec 6 '11 at 21:35
    
No problem, these things happen. Don't remove the question, let others have the chance to find an answer if they have a similar problem. –  cli_hlt Dec 6 '11 at 21:41
    
SOUNDS GOOD –  Wylie Coyote SG. Dec 6 '11 at 22:00

Avoid using pointers whenever you can. You don't need them here.

string getSecertCode()
{
  string code;
  code.append("CR");
  [...]

  code.append(converter.str());
  code.append("NQ");

  return code;
}

int main()
{
  string newcode;
  [...]
}
share|improve this answer

the problem is your inderecting a pointer into cout.

change

cout << newcode << endl;

to

cout << *newcode << endl;

and you will see your values.

with pointers, if you want to look at the value of the pointer you have to dereference it as in

*pointer;

if you wish to look at the address of that value, just use the pointer.

share|improve this answer

Your main issue is probably:

cout << newcode << endl;

where you're printing the pointer (string*) instead of the string. You may print the string by dereferencing the variable:

cout << *newcode << endl;

Secondarily, you have a memory leak as your subfunction allocates strings that are never deleted.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.