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I am using this code inside a jQuery plugin:

setInterval(function() {                        
   localStorage.setItem("flag", "set");
   var data = $(this).serializeArray();
   console.log($(this));
   $.each(data, function(i, obj) {
      localStorage.setItem(obj.name, obj.value);
   });
   console.log('saved');
   console.log(localStorage);                       
}, 5000);

if (localStorage.getItem("flag") == "set") {
   alert("This form has saved data!");
   var data = $(this).serializeArray();
   console.log($(this));
   $.each(data, function(i, obj) {
      $("[name='" + obj.name +"']").val(localStorage.getItem(obj.name));
   });                      
}

Now strangely, the first $(this) contains the form (which the plugin is ran on), but the second $(this) contains DOMWindow. How come the two $(this) contain different things? Is it because the first is inside a setInterval?

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yes, also note that this is overwritten by JQuery in many cases. –  DMoses Dec 6 '11 at 21:23
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can either use a simple closure, or use $.proxy: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.proxy/

var repeat = function() {                        
    localStorage.setItem("flag", "set");
    var data = $(this).serializeArray();
    .......
}

setInterval($.proxy(repeat, $("#form")), 500);

Something like that...

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Yes, you have an anonymous function (a function without a name) in your setInterval declaration which creates its own scope.

The first console.log($(this)) will have access to anything global or anything set within itself and the second console.log($(this)) will have access only to global variables (and as you've found out, this in the global scope is the window object).

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It's not that it's inside setInterval but rather that it's inside that anonymous function.

The first $(this) is in the scope of the anonymous function. The second $(this) is in the global scope.

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this is a reference to the current object. It represents the context of a function. The default reference is the global one (in our case the window object).
Because the setInterval callback is being executed in the global scope, this will always point to the window object.
Here are some examples that illustrate the connection between this and the scope :

var a = "window";
function f(){
    console.log(this.a);
}
f();// scope = window
var obj = {a:'object',f:f};
obj.f();// scope = object
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