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I'm trying to make a simple shell-replica (in C) for learning purposes. The section of code below shows where I'm at the moment:

#define TRUE ( 1 )
#define NUMBEROFARGUMENTS ( 5 )

void execute(char** input){

    pid_t pid;
    pid = fork();   

    if (pid == 0){
        printf("Spawned foreground process pid: %d\n", getpid());
        execvp(input[0], input);
        _exit(1);
    } else {
        waitpid(pid, NULL, 0);
        printf("Foreground process %d terminated.\n", pid);
    }

}

void check_input(char** input){

    char in[70];
    char *tok_inline;

    gets(in);   
    tok_inline = strtok(in," ");

    int i;
    for(i=0; i < NUMBEROFARGUMENTS; i++){
        input[i] = tok_inline;
        tok_inline = strtok(NULL," ");
    }

}

int main(){

    char* input[NUMBEROFARGUMENTS];

    printf("MiniShell v2.5\n");

    while ( TRUE ){

        printf("--> ");

        check_input(input);

        if ( strcmp ( input[0], "cd" ) == 0 ){
            chdir(input[1]);
        } else if ( strcmp( input[0], "exit" ) == 0 ){
            exit(0);
        } else {    
            execute(input);
        }

    }
        exit(0);
}

I have however run into a problem I can't seem to find an answer to. After I do fork() in the execute-method, the array of strings, input, doesn't appear to have the same values as before forking. If I try to print out the strings stored in input before forking, everything seems to be in order but after forking input doesn't longer contain the strings it should have and therefore execvp() doesn't execute properly.

Is there something I have missed or have I misunderstood something about how fork() etc. works? From what I can tell the code above should do what I want it to do.

Please be advice, thank you.

share|improve this question
    
What platform is this on? –  StilesCrisis Dec 6 '11 at 22:12
    
Don't use gets. Validate your inputs. Check your return values. –  ninjalj Dec 6 '11 at 22:23
    
If you by platform mean OS, its Windows Vista. –  bzander Dec 6 '11 at 22:23
    
Windows doesn't fork. You're probably using some i-wish-i-was-*nix layer like Cygwin on top of it. –  cHao Dec 6 '11 at 22:24
    
Yeah, I'm using Cygwin and using g++ to compile. –  bzander Dec 6 '11 at 22:30

3 Answers 3

Never return a pointer to a local variable back to the caller of a function.

char in[70];
/* ... */
tok_inline = strtok(in," ");

int i;
for(i=0; i < NUMBEROFARGUMENTS; i++){
    input[i] = tok_inline;
    /* ... */

The return value of strtok is a pointer to a position inside of in and not a copy or anything like that. Since in is allocated on the stack and not dynamically using malloc, it and those pointers will no longer be valid when check_input returns and the stack frame is destroyed.

Keeping a pointer to any of these variables that no longer exist will result in undefined behaviour. As you have noticed, when that position on the stack is reused for anything else (other variables, function calls, etc), your (invalid) strings are going to be messed up.

An alternative is to use strdup on tok_inline, which uses malloc to make a duplicate of the string.

EDIT: You should also be checking the return value of strtok (ie. tok_inline) in the condition of your for loop, and terminating also if NULL is returned - meaning that there are no more tokens.

Change your for loop signature to: for(i=0; i < NUMBEROFARGUMENTS && tok_inline; i++).

Also, consider using fgets(in, 70, stdin); as opposed to gets, which is unsafe and can cause buffer overflows if the size of the input is greater than that of your buffer. Also note that the newline char '\n' is stored at the end of the buffer if it fits.

EDIT2: Also, the second argument (argv) passed to execvp is a NULL terminated array of strings, ie. {"ls", NULL }. In order to do that:

  • Add input[i] = NULL; after the for loop in check_input
  • Change char* input[NUMBEROFARGUMENTS]; to char* input[NUMBEROFARGUMENTS + 1]; so that you have 1 more element in the array for the NULL.

Also, if you decide to use fgets, you're going to need to remove the '\n' from the end of the buffer (if it exists). Your check_input function could then look something like:

void check_input(char** input){

    char in[70];
    char *tok_inline;
    size_t len;

    fgets(in, 70, stdin);
    len = strlen(in);
    if (in[len - 1] == '\n')
        in[len - 1] = '\0';

    tok_inline = strtok(in," ");

    int i;
    for(i=0; i < NUMBEROFARGUMENTS && tok_inline; i++){
        input[i] = strdup(tok_inline);
        tok_inline = strtok(NULL," ");
    }

    input[i] = NULL;
}

EDIT3: In relation to your final query about memory leaks, yes you should free up the memory. You don't need to in the child, since when it calls exec it's process will be replaced with that of the new process.

You should, however, free up memory allocated by the parent. Since we've NULL terminated our array, simply add the following to anywhere in the else block of execute:

while (*input)
    free(*input);
share|improve this answer
    
@bzander: Also, execvp expects a NULL terminated array - added another edit. –  AusCBloke Dec 6 '11 at 23:17
    
Thank you, this seems to work like a charm. Your solution also worked around my follow up problem (my "reader" didn't seem to handle "." properly). Just one question, aren't you suppose to free up the memory allocated when using strdup() at some point to avoid possible memory leaks? –  bzander Dec 6 '11 at 23:31
    
@bzander: Yes you should, for the parent. Check the latest edit. –  AusCBloke Dec 6 '11 at 23:55

Watch out with copying your input from gets() to a stack variable. The line

 input[i] = tok_inline;

Is where your problems lie. You must copy the tok_inline string to a place will be around after a fork. As it stands, it might happen to be still there when you do a printf() in your parent, but it wont be in your child process.

You have to do something like this (not verified):

input[i] = malloc((strlen(tok_inline)+1)*sizeof(*tok_inline));
strcpy(input[i], tok_inline);

This is a rather terribly way to do it, since you'll leak memory, but it gets my point across.

share|improve this answer
    
It's only "terrible" in the sense that strdup will do the above more efficiently. You're going to need to malloc memory in order for the OP's code to work. –  AusCBloke Dec 6 '11 at 22:31
    
.. or use a valid part of the stack. –  Rooke Dec 6 '11 at 22:37
    
Then you'd need to have a fixed-sized buffer allocated on the stack to be passed to check_input, what if you don't want that or your input is too large? Actually in is a char[70], so fixed-sized buffers wouldn't be too bad, but for the OP's current code to work you still need to malloc memory for the strings pointed to by input. –  AusCBloke Dec 6 '11 at 22:42

Your problem has nothing to do with forking.

char in[70]; is on the stack. check_input processes it, but after it returns, the next function call(s) will start to overwrite that memory location, and consequently, overwrite the tokens. Use malloc for memory allocation.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way I could structure the program without using malloc? –  bzander Dec 6 '11 at 22:29
    
@bzander: Fixed-sized buffers allocated on the stack, which have tok_inline copied into them. –  AusCBloke Dec 6 '11 at 22:44
    
global variable, variable in main() all should be fine. just don't return a local variable. –  Karoly Horvath Dec 6 '11 at 23:17

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