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I need to check a JavaScript array to see if there are any duplicate values. What's the easiest way to do this? I just need to find what the duplicated values are - I don't actually need their indexes or how many times they are duplicated.

I know I can loop through the array and check all the other values for a match, but it seems like there should be an easier way. Any ideas? Thanks!

Related: Remove Duplicates from JavaScript Array

share|improve this question
10  
There seems to be years of confusion about what this question asks. I needed to know what elements in the array were duplicated: "I just need to find what the duplicated values are". The correct answer should NOT remove duplicates from the array. That's the inverse of what I wanted: a list of the duplicates, not a list of unique elements. – Scott Saunders Feb 22 '13 at 15:47
1  
For a simpler O(n), follow my answer below. – Rafael Xavier May 23 '13 at 14:33

39 Answers 39

up vote 132 down vote accepted

You could sort the array and then run through it and then see if the next (or previous) index is the same as the current. Assuming your sort algorithm is good, this should be less than O(n2):

var arr = [9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7];
var sorted_arr = arr.slice().sort(); // You can define the comparing function here. 
                                     // JS by default uses a crappy string compare.
                                     // (we use slice to clone the array so the original array won't be modified)
var results = [];
for (var i = 0; i < arr.length - 1; i++) {
    if (sorted_arr[i + 1] == sorted_arr[i]) {
        results.push(sorted_arr[i]);
    }
}

alert(results);

share|improve this answer
8  
"Assuming your sort algorithm is good, this should be less than O^2". Specifically, it could be O(n*log(n)). – ESRogs May 8 '09 at 17:20
33  
This script doesn't work so well with more than 2 duplicates (e.g. arr = [9, 9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7]; – Mottie Oct 23 '10 at 15:00
7  
@swilliams I don't think those guidelines say anything about not using i++. Instead, they say not to write j = i + +j. Two different things IMHO. I think i += 1 is more confusing than the simple and beautiful i++ :) – Danilo Bargen Dec 23 '10 at 14:31
11  
-1 This answer is wrong on many levels. First of all var sorted_arr = arr.sort() is useless: arr.sort() mutates the original array (which is a problem in its own right). This also discards an element. (Run the code above. What happens to 9?) cc @dystroy A cleaner solution would be results = arr.filter(function(elem, pos) { return arr.indexOf(elem) == pos; }) – NullUserException Jan 13 '13 at 21:10
11  
Everyone: the question asks to display the duplicate values, not to remove them. Please don't edit/break the code to try to make it do something it's not trying to do. The alert should show the values that are duplicated. – Scott Saunders Feb 22 '13 at 15:50

If you want to elimate the duplicates, try this great solution:

function eliminateDuplicates(arr) {
  var i,
      len=arr.length,
      out=[],
      obj={};

  for (i=0;i<len;i++) {
    obj[arr[i]]=0;
  }
  for (i in obj) {
    out.push(i);
  }
  return out;
}

Its one of the greatest code snippets for JavaScript i've seen. The original is published here: http://dreaminginjavascript.wordpress.com/2008/08/22/eliminating-duplicates/

share|improve this answer
5  
That is good code, but unfortunately it doesn't do what I'm asking for. – Scott Saunders May 8 '09 at 17:59
47  
The code above (which is mine--that's my blog) gets you pretty close. A small tweak and you're there. First of all, you can see if arr.length and out.length are the same. If they are the same, there are no duplicated elements. But you want a little more. If you want to "catch" the dupes as they happen, check to see if the length of the array increases after the obj[arr[i]]=0 line. Nifty, eh? :-) Thanks for the nice words, Raphael Montanaro. – Nosredna May 8 '09 at 22:25
5  
@MarcoDemaio: Uh, no, why would the code not work with spaces? You can put whatever you like in a property name - just can't use the dot syntax to access ones with spaces (nor props with various other characters which would break parsing). – Gijs Oct 11 '11 at 10:29
3  
@Gijs: +1 you are right. I didn't know it. But it still does not work when it's an array of objects. – Marco Demaio Oct 16 '11 at 12:19
3  
This algorithm also has the side effect of returning a sorted array, which might not be what you want. – asymmetric Jun 3 '12 at 19:26

This is my answer from the duplicate thread (!):

Got tired of seeing all bad examples with for-loops or jQuery. Javascript has the perfect tools for this nowadays: sort, map and reduce.

Find duplicate items

var names = ['Mike', 'Matt', 'Nancy', 'Adam', 'Jenny', 'Nancy', 'Carl']

var uniq = names
.map((name) => {
  return {count: 1, name: name}
})
.reduce((a, b) => {
  a[b.name] = (a[b.name] || 0) + b.count
  return a
}, {})

var duplicates = Object.keys(uniq).filter((a) => uniq[a] > 1)

console.log(duplicates) // [ 'Nancy' ]
share|improve this answer
4  
Definitely better than most answers. – RWC Dec 3 '14 at 13:55

You can add this function, or tweak it and add it to Javascript's Array prototype:

Array.prototype.unique = function () {
    var r = new Array();
    o:for(var i = 0, n = this.length; i < n; i++)
    {
    	for(var x = 0, y = r.length; x < y; x++)
    	{
    		if(r[x]==this[i])
    		{
                alert('this is a DUPE!');
    			continue o;
    		}
    	}
    	r[r.length] = this[i];
    }
    return r;
}

var arr = [1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,2,3,7,8,5,9];
var unique = arr.unique();
alert(unique);
share|improve this answer

UPDATED: The following uses an optimized combined strategy. It optimizes primitive lookups to benefit from hash O(1) lookup time (running unique on an array of primitives is O(n)). Object lookups are optimized by tagging objects with a unique id while iterating through so so identifying duplicate objects is also O(1) per item and O(n) for the whole list. The only exception is items that are frozen, but those are rare and a fallback is provided using an array and indexOf.

var unique = function(){
  var hasOwn = {}.hasOwnProperty,
      toString = {}.toString,
      uids = {};

  function uid(){
    var key = Math.random().toString(36).slice(2);
    return key in uids ? uid() : uids[key] = key;
  }

  function unique(array){
    var strings = {}, numbers = {}, others = {},
        tagged = [], failed = [],
        count = 0, i = array.length,
        item, type;

    var id = uid();

    while (i--) {
      item = array[i];
      type = typeof item;
      if (item == null || type !== 'object' && type !== 'function') {
        // primitive
        switch (type) {
          case 'string': strings[item] = true; break;
          case 'number': numbers[item] = true; break;
          default: others[item] = item; break;
        }
      } else {
        // object
        if (!hasOwn.call(item, id)) {
          try {
            item[id] = true;
            tagged[count++] = item;
          } catch (e){
            if (failed.indexOf(item) === -1)
              failed[failed.length] = item;
          }
        }
      }
    }

    // remove the tags
    while (count--)
      delete tagged[count][id];

    tagged = tagged.concat(failed);
    count = tagged.length;

    // append primitives to results
    for (i in strings)
      if (hasOwn.call(strings, i))
        tagged[count++] = i;

    for (i in numbers)
      if (hasOwn.call(numbers, i))
        tagged[count++] = +i;

    for (i in others)
      if (hasOwn.call(others, i))
        tagged[count++] = others[i];

    return tagged;
  }

  return unique;
}();

If you have ES6 Collections available, then there is a much simpler and significantly faster version. (shim for IE9+ and other browsers here: https://github.com/Benvie/ES6-Harmony-Collections-Shim)

function unique(array){
  var seen = new Set;
  return array.filter(function(item){
    if (!seen.has(item)) {
      seen.add(item);
      return true;
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I was answering another question and apparently accidentally clicked on someone linking to this one, calling it a duplicate, and ended up cloning my answer and confusing the hell out of myself. I edit my stuff a lot. – benvie Oct 28 '11 at 11:19
14  
I think it's nice with different solutions. It doesn't matter that the topic is old and solved since it's still possible to come up with different ways of doing this. It's a typical problem in computer science. – Emil Vikström Nov 30 '11 at 12:53

This should get you what you want, Just the duplicates.

function find_duplicates(arr) {
  var len=arr.length,
      out=[],
      counts={};

  for (var i=0;i<len;i++) {
    var item = arr[i];
    counts[item] = counts[item] >= 1 ? counts[item] + 1 : 1;
  }

  for (var item in counts) {
    if(counts[item] > 1)
      out.push(item);
  }

  return out;
}

find_duplicates(['one',2,3,4,4,4,5,6,7,7,7,'pig','one']); // -> ['one',4,7] in no particular order.
share|improve this answer
3  
var count is not used.. – vsync Nov 1 '09 at 14:10

using underscore.js

function hasDuplicate(arr){
    return (arr.length != _.uniq(arr).length);
}
share|improve this answer

Find unique values from 3 arrays (or more):

Array.prototype.unique = function () {
    var arr = this.sort(), i; // input must be sorted for this to work
    for( i=arr.length; i--; )
      arr[i] === arr[i-1] && arr.splice(i,1); // remove duplicate item

    return arr;
}

var arr =  [1,2,2,3,3,4,5,6,2,3,7,8,5,9],
    arr2 = [1,2,511,12,50],
    arr3 = [22],
    unique = arr.concat(arr2, arr3).unique();

console.log(unique);  // [22, 50, 12, 511, 2, 1, 9, 5, 8, 7, 3, 6, 4]

Just a polyfill for array indexOf for old browsers:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf){
   Array.prototype.indexOf = function(elt /*, from*/){
     var len = this.length >>> 0;

     var from = Number(arguments[1]) || 0;
     from = (from < 0) ? Math.ceil(from) : Math.floor(from);
     if (from < 0)
        from += len;

     for (; from < len; from++){
        if (from in this && this[from] === elt)
           return from;
     }
     return -1;
  };
}

jQuery solution using "inArray":

if( $.inArray(this[i], arr) == -1 )

instead of adding the 'Array.prototype.indexOf'

share|improve this answer
var a = [324,3,32,5,52,2100,1,20,2,3,3,2,2,2,1,1,1].sort();
a.filter(function(v,i,o){return i&&v!==o[i-1]?v:0;});

or when added to the prototyp.chain of Array

//copy and paste: without error handling
Array.prototype.unique = 
   function(){return this.sort().filter(function(v,i,o){return i&&v!==o[i-1]?v:0;});}

See here: https://gist.github.com/1305056

share|improve this answer
1  
The filter function should return true or false, not the element itself. Filtering an array containing 0's would not have returned them. – mflodin Jan 9 '12 at 23:43

The following function (a variation of the eliminateDuplicates function already mentioned) seems to do the trick, returning test2,1,7,5 for the input ["test", "test2", "test2", 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 7, 10, 22, 43, 1, 5, 8]

Note that the problem is stranger in JavaScript than in most other languages, because a JavaScript array can hold just about anything. Note that solutions that use sorting might need to provide an appropriate sorting function--I haven't tried that route yet.

This particular implementation works for (at least) strings and numbers.

function findDuplicates(arr) {
	var i,
    	len=arr.length,
    	out=[],
    	obj={};

	for (i=0;i<len;i++) {
		if (obj[arr[i]] != null) {
			if (!obj[arr[i]]) {
				out.push(arr[i]);
				obj[arr[i]] = 1;
			}
		} else {
			obj[arr[i]] = 0;			
		}
	}
	return out;
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a very light and easy way:

var codes = dc_1.split(',');
var i = codes.length;
while (i--) {
  if (codes.indexOf(codes[i]) != i) {
    codes.splice(i,1);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
var a = ["a","a","b","c","c"];

a.filter(function(value,index,self){ return (self.indexOf(value) !== index )})
share|improve this answer

I prefer the function way of doing this.

function removeDuplicates(links) {
    return _.reduce(links, function(list, elem) { 
        if (list.indexOf(elem) == -1) {
            list.push(elem);
        }   
        return list;
    }, []);
}

This uses underscore, but Array has a reduce function, too

share|improve this answer
var input = ['a', 'b', 'a', 'c', 'c'],
    duplicates = [],
    i, j;
for (i = 0, j = input.length; i < j; i++) {
  if (duplicates.indexOf(input[i]) === -1 && input.indexOf(input[i], i+1) !== -1) {
    duplicates.push(input[i]);
  }
}

console.log(duplicates);
share|improve this answer

Modifying @RaphaelMontanaro's solution, borrowing from @Nosredna's blog, here is what you could do if you just want to identify the duplicate elements from your array.

function identifyDuplicatesFromArray(arr) {
        var i;
        var len = arr.length;
        var obj = {};
        var duplicates = [];

        for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {

            if (!obj[arr[i]]) {

                obj[arr[i]] = {};

            }

            else
            {
                duplicates.push(arr[i]);
            }

        }
        return duplicates;
    }

Thanks for the elegant solution, @Nosredna!

share|improve this answer

I did not like most answers.

Why? Too complicated, too much code, inefficient code and many do not answer the question, which is to find the duplicates (and not to give an array without the duplicates).

Next function returns all duplicates:

function GetDuplicates(arr) {
  var i, out=[], obj={};
  for (i=0; i < arr.length; i++) 
    obj[arr[i]] == undefined ? obj[arr[i]] ++ : out.push(arr[i]);
  return out;
}  

Because most of the time it is of no use to return ALL duplicates, but just to tell which duplicate values exist. In that case you return an array with unique duplicates ;-)

function GetDuplicates(arr) {
  var i, out=[], obj={};
  for (i=0; i < arr.length; i++)
    obj[arr[i]] == undefined ? obj[arr[i]] ++ : out.push(arr[i]);
  return GetUnique(out);
}

function GetUnique(arr) {
  return $.grep(arr, function(elem, index) {
    return index == $.inArray(elem, arr);
  });
}

Maybe somebody else thinks the same.

share|improve this answer

This is probably one of the fastest way to remove permanently the duplicates from an array 10x times faster than the most functions here.& 78x faster in safari

function toUnique(a,b,c){//array,placeholder,placeholder
 b=a.length;
 while(c=--b)while(c--)a[b]!==a[c]||a.splice(c,1)
}
var array=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,1,2,1];
toUnique(array);
console.log(array);
  1. Test: http://jsperf.com/wgu
  2. Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/46S7g/
  3. More: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25082874/2450730

if you can't read the code above ask, read a javascript book or here are some explainations about shorter code. http://stackoverflow.com/a/21353032/2450730

EDIT As stated in the comments this function does return an array with uniques, the question however asks to find the duplicates. in that case a simple modification to this function allows to push the duplicaes into an array, then using using the previous function toUnique removes the duplicates of the duplicates.

function theDuplicates(a,b,c,d){//array,placeholder,placeholder
 b=a.length,d=[];
 while(c=--b)while(c--)a[b]!==a[c]||d.push(a.splice(c,1))
}
var array=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,1,2,1];

toUnique(theDuplicates(array));
share|improve this answer

When all you need is to check that there are no duplicates as asked in this question you can use the every() method:

[1, 2, 3].every(function(elem, i, array){return array.lastIndexOf(elem) === i}) // true

[1, 2, 1].every(function(elem, i, array){return array.lastIndexOf(elem) === i}) // false

Note that every() doesn't work for IE 8 and below.

I use lastIndexOf() because it might be more efficient than indexOf() if function callbacks made by every() are made in the index order, but that's not proven.

In CoffeeScript I'm using this:

Array::duplicates = -> not @every((elem, i, array) -> array.lastIndexOf(elem) is i)

[1, 2, 3].duplicates() // false
[1, 2, 1].duplicates() // true
share|improve this answer

Find duplicate values in an array

This should be one of the shortest ways to actually find duplicate values in an array. As specifically asked for by the OP, this does not remove duplicates but find them.

var input = [1, 2, 3, 1, 3, 1];

var duplicates = input.reduce(function(acc, el, i, arr) {
  if (arr.indexOf(el) !== i && acc.indexOf(el) < 0) acc.push(el); return acc;
}, []);

document.write(duplicates); // = 1,3 (actual array == [1, 3])

This doesn't need sorting or any third party framework. It also doesn't need manual loops. It works with every value indexOf() (or to be clearer: the strict comparision operator) supports.

Because of reduce() and indexOf() it needs at least IE 9.

share|improve this answer

The Prototype library has a uniq function, which returns the array without the dupes. That's only half of the work though.

share|improve this answer

Just to add some theory to the above.

Finding duplicates has a lower bound of O(n*log(n) in the comparison model. SO theoretically, you cannot do any better than first sorting then going through the list sequentially removing any duplicates you find.

If you want to find the duplicates in linear (O(n)) expected time, you could hash each element of the list; if there is a collision, remove/label it as a duplicate, and continue.

share|improve this answer

Yet another way by using underscore. Numbers is the source array and dupes has possible duplicate values.

var itemcounts = _.countBy(numbers, function (n) { return n; });
var dupes = _.reduce(itemcounts, function (memo, item, idx) {
    if (item > 1)
        memo.push(idx);
    return memo;
}, []);
share|improve this answer

I think the below is the easiest and fastest O(n) way to accomplish exactly what you asked:

function getDuplicates( arr ) {
  var i, value;
  var all = {};
  var duplicates = [];

  for( i=0; i<arr.length; i++ ) {
    value = arr[i];
    if( all[value] ) {
      duplicates.push( value );
      all[value] = false;
    } else if( typeof all[value] == "undefined" ) {
      all[value] = true;
    }
  }

  return duplicates;
}

Or for ES5 or greater:

function getDuplicates( arr ) {
  var all = {};
  return arr.reduce(function( duplicates, value ) {
    if( all[value] ) {
      duplicates.push(value);
      all[value] = false;
    } else if( typeof all[value] == "undefined" ) {
      all[value] = true;
    }
    return duplicates;
  }, []);
}
share|improve this answer

var arr = [2, 1, 2, 2, 4, 4, 2, 5];

function returnDuplicates(arr) {
  return arr.reduce(function(dupes, val, i) {
    if (arr.indexOf(val) !== i && dupes.indexOf(val) === -1) {
      dupes.push(val);
    }
    return dupes;
  }, []);
}

alert(returnDuplicates(arr));

This function avoids the sorting step and uses the reduce() method to push duplicates to a new array if it doesn't already exist in it.

share|improve this answer

To solve the above in O(n) time complexity (without sorting).

var arr = [9, 9, 111, 2, 3, 4, 4, 5, 7];

var obj={};

for(var i=0;i<arr.length;i++){
    if(!obj[arr[i]]){
        obj[arr[i]]=1;
    } else {
        obj[arr[i]]=obj[arr[i]]+1;
    }
}
var result=[]
for(var key in obj){
    if(obj[key]>1){
        result.push(Number(key)) // change this to result.push(key) to find duplicate strings in an array
    }
}

console.log(result)
share|improve this answer

/* The indexOf method of the Array object is useful for comparing array items. IE is the only major browser that does not natively support it, but it is easy to implement: */

Array.prototype.indexOf= Array.prototype.indexOf || function(what, i){
    i= i || 0;
    var L= this.length;
    while(i<L){
    	if(this[i]=== what) return i;
    	++i;
    }
    return -1;
}

function getarrayduplicates(arg){
    var itm, A= arg.slice(0, arg.length), dups= [];
    while(A.length){
    	itm= A.shift();
    	if(A.indexOf(itm)!= -1 && dups.indexOf(itm)== -1){
    		dups[dups.length]= itm;
    	}
    }
    return dups;
}

var a1= [1, 22, 3, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 1, 22, 7, 8, 9];

alert(getarrayduplicates(a1));

For very large arrays, it can be faster to remove the duplicates from the array as they are found, so that they will not be looked at again:

function getarrayduplicates(arg){
    var itm, A= arg.slice(0, arg.length), dups= [];
    while(A.length){
    	itm= A.shift();
    	if(A.indexOf(itm)!= -1){
    		dups[dups.length]= itm;
    		while(A.indexOf(itm)!= -1){
    			A.splice(A.indexOf(itm), 1);
    		}
    	}
    }
    return dups;
}
share|improve this answer

From Raphael Montanaro answer, it can improve to use with array/object item as follows.

function eliminateDuplicates(arr) {
  var len = arr.length,
      out = [],
      obj = {};

  for (var key, i=0; i < len; i++) {
    key = JSON.stringify(arr[i]);
    obj[key] = (obj[key]) ? obj[key] + 1 : 1;
  }
  for (var key in obj) {
    out.push(JSON.parse(key));
  }
  return [out, obj];
}

Note: You need to use JSON library for browser that's not supported JSON.

share|improve this answer

http://jsfiddle.net/vol7ron/gfJ28/

var arr  = ['hello','goodbye','foo','hello','foo','bar',1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0,1,2,3];
var hash = [];

// build hash
for (var n=arr.length; n--; ){
   if (typeof hash[arr[n]] === 'undefined') hash[arr[n]] = [];
   hash[arr[n]].push(n);
}


// work with compiled hash (not necessary)
var duplicates = [];
for (var key in hash){
    if (hash.hasOwnProperty(key) && hash[key].length > 1){
        duplicates.push(key);
    }
}    
alert(duplicates);
  1. The result will be the hash array, which will contain both a unique set of values and the position of those values. So if there are 2 or more positions, we can determine that the value has a duplicate. Thus, every place hash[<value>].length > 1, signifies a duplicate.

  2. hash['hello'] will return [0,3] because 'hello' was found in node 0 and 3 in arr[].

    Note: the length of [0,3] is what's used to determine if it was a duplicate.

  3. Using for(var key in hash){ if (hash.hasOwnProperty(key)){ alert(key); } } will alert each unique value.

share|improve this answer
function remove_dups(arrayName){
  var newArray = new Array();

  label:for(var i=0; i<arrayName.length; i++ ){  

     for(var j=0; j<newArray.length;j++ ){
       if(newArray[j]==arrayName[i]){
         continue label;
       }
     }

     newArray[newArray.length] = arrayName[i];

  }

  return newArray;
}
share|improve this answer

ES5 only (i.e., it needs a filter() polyfill for IE8 and below):

var arrayToFilter = [ 4, 5, 5, 5, 2, 1, 3, 1, 1, 2, 1, 3 ];

arrayToFilter.
    sort().
    filter( function(me,i,arr){
       return (i===0) || ( me !== arr[i-1] );
    });
share|improve this answer

protected by mmm Feb 28 at 10:45

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