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I'm using the mini_fb gem in ruby to create an ad group:

response = fb_ads.create_ad_groups_with_image('adgroup_specs' => adgroup_specs)

If the ad text contains certain characters, such as ∑, this fails with the following error:

The text contains an invalid character. Ads may only contain alphanumeric characters, punctuation, and spaces. Note that line breaks and = are not allowed.

However, there are many other characters, such as π, ö é, î, ä, å, ç, è, and ø, that are accepted just fine. Is there a list somewhere of what characters Facebook accepts in its ads, or a quick API call that I can make to check whether a string will pass?

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2 Answers

The Facebook Ads system allows ad titles and body text in most languages around the world. However the symbol you've pasted in above is in a Unicode range dedicated to mathematical symbols. It isn't allowed in the body or title of a Facebook ad. The character you entered (Unicode U2211) has a good alternate in the Greek alphabet range of Unicode at U03A3. Entering HTML entities is not going to render like you want.

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While this is the best answer, it is not "drawing from credible and/or official sources." I can't really bet my employer's customer's ads on an answer like this. Unicode has a lot of different ranges, and I want a definitive answer on which ones are in or out. All I have for certain is a short whitelist of characters that I know work: ßåäãáàçčéèëêïíìıñóöòøšüúùπÅÄÃÁÀÇČÉÈËÊÏÍÌÑÓÖÒØŠÜÚÙΠ –  Alan Hensel Dec 15 '11 at 15:27
    
Thanks for explaining the π and not ∑ mystery, though. –  Alan Hensel Dec 15 '11 at 15:28
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I don't have a link for you, but it is very likely that Facebook only supports/allows extended ASCII characters in their ads. That would include the characters you listed, but the "sum" character you listed is not within extended ascii. Have you tried using html entities for the "special" characters you need?

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Extended ASCII doesn't include π, but MacRoman does. However, MacRoman also includes ∑...perhaps there's a character encoding issue? –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Dec 9 '11 at 22:32
    
HTML entities are not going to render like you want in your creative. Using normal unicode values ought to work, but values that fall in the range for math symbols are not allowed. –  Justin Voskuhl Dec 13 '11 at 23:36
    
Why wouldn't math symbols be allowed? It's just text, right? –  Marnen Laibow-Koser Dec 23 '11 at 0:03
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I'm guessing it's a consequence of the policy: "the use of all symbols, numbers, or letters must adhere to the true meaning of the symbol" -- and they are betting (probably correctly) that there will not be any serious use of math in real ads (convincing as it may be to a mathematician!). –  Alan Hensel Jan 3 '12 at 17:13
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