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I'm creating a website that will feature news articles. These articles will appear in two columns at the bottom of the page. There will be a button at the bottom to load additional news stories. That means that I need to be able to specify what news story to load. Server-side, I'm simply implementing this with a LIMIT clause in my SQL statement, supplying the :first parameter like so:

SELECT * 
FROM news 
ORDER BY `date` DESC 
LIMIT :first, 1

This means that, client-side, I need to keep track of how many news items I've loaded. I've implemented this by having the function to load new information be kept in an object with a property holding the number of items loaded. I'm worried that this is somehow a race condition that I am not seeing, though, where my loadNewInformation() will be called twice before the number is incremented. My code is as follows:

var News = {

    newInfoItems: 0,

    loadNewInformation: function(side) {
        this.newInfoItems += 1;
        jQuery.get(
            '/api/news/'+ (this.newInfoItems - 1),
            function(html) {
                jQuery('div.col'+side).append(html);
            }
        );
    }
}

On page load, this is being called in the following fashion:

News.loadNewInformation('left');
News.loadNewInformation('right');

I could have implemented this in such a way that the success handler of a first call made another AJAX request for the second, which clearly would not be a race condition...but this seems like sloppy code. Thoughts?

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I created a jsfiddle with completely untested code that might do something more like what you want. Let me know if you need any help reading through it. Updated it –  JesseBuesking Dec 6 '11 at 23:26
    
I really like what you did here. It's useful enough that I might try to bring the general idea of an AJAX queue out into its own object, so that each class of AJAX requests can be queued while others can be executed asynchronously. –  rybosome Dec 13 '11 at 20:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

(Yes, there is a race condition.)

Addressing Just the JavaScript

All JavaScript code on a page (excluding Web-Workers), which includes callbacks, is run "mutually exclusive".

In this case, because newInfoItems is eagerly evaluated, it is not even that complex: both "/api/news/0" and "/api/news/1" are guaranteed to be fetched (or fail in an attempt). Compare it to this:

// eager evaluation: value of url computed BEFORE request
// this is same as in example (with "fixed" increment order ;-)
// and is just to show point
var url = "/api/news/" + this.newInfoItems
this.newInfoItems += 1;
jQuery.get(url, 
    function(html) {
        // only evaluated on AJAX callback - order of callbacks
        // not defined, but will still be mutually exclusive.
        jQuery('div.col'+side).append(html);
    }
);

However, the order in which the AJAX requests complete is not defined and is influenced by both the server and browser. Furthermore, as discussed below, there is no atomic context established between the server and individual AJAX requests.

Addressing the JavaScript in Context

Now, even though it's established that "/api/news/0" and "/api/news/1" will be invoked, imagine this unlikely, but theoretically possible situation:

  • articles B,A exist in database
  • browser sends both AJAX requests -- asynchronously or synchronously, it doesn't matter!
  • an article is added to the database sometime between when
    • the server processes the news/0 request, and
    • the server processes the news/1 request

Then, this happens:

  • news/0 returns article B (articles B,A in database)
  • article C added
  • news/1 returns article B (articles C,B,A in database)

Note that article B was returned twice! Oops :)

So, while the race-condition "seems fairly unlikely", it does exist. A similar race condition (with different results) can occur if news/1 is processed before news/0 and (once again) an article is added between the requests: there no atomic guarantee in either case!

(The above race condition would be more likely if executing the AJAX requests in-series as the time for a new article being added is increased.)

Possible Solution

Consider fetching say, n (2 is okay!) articles in a single request (e.g. "/api/latest/n"), and then laying out the articles as appropriate in the callback. For instance, the first half of the articles on the left and the second half on right, or whatever is appropriate.

As well as eliminating the particular race-condition above by making the single request an atomic action -- with respect to article additions -- it will also result in less network traffic and less work for the server.

The fetch for the API might then look like:

SELECT * 
FROM news 
ORDER BY `date` DESC 
LIMIT :n

Happy coding.

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Yes, technically, this could create a race condition of sorts. The calls are asynchronous, and if the first got held up for some reason, the second could return first.

However, as you don't have a great deal that goes on in your callback functions that depend on the presence of the other 'side' being populated I don't see where it should cause you too much grief.

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Is there a more elegant way that this could be handled? –  rybosome Dec 6 '11 at 23:20
    
@Ryan - Can you elaborate on "elegant"? Do you mean "is there a way to approach this that ensures that they always populate in the order I call them in"? You already hinted that you saw how you could do that by way of calling the second load in the callback function of the first. Ideally though, you don't want to entwine them. You could create a Queue of pending requests, fire one, and then bind to ajaxStop to wait for the first to return before firing the second. –  g.d.d.c Dec 6 '11 at 23:24
    
I guess by more "elegant", I meant something that a more senior-dev wouldn't sneer at if they saw. ;) I'm not really worried if one appears before the other, since the page will still look fine. They're being plopped into absolutely-positioned divs, so their layout is not influenced by the other's presence. –  rybosome Dec 6 '11 at 23:31

Shouldn't be any race conditions, must be something else wrong in your code. The counter is incremented before your .get() call, so prior to each get the counter should be incremented correctly. Short example to demostrate that it works when called sequentially: http://jsfiddle.net/KkpwF/

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I haven't seen any errors, it works exactly as expected. This was more curiosity/precautionary. Thanks though, fun jsfiddle! =) –  rybosome Dec 6 '11 at 23:29

I reckon you're hinting at the newItemInfo counter?

Observations:

  1. You're calling News.loadNewInformation twice, with a callback function which will be executed on AJAX completion.
  2. The callback method you provide does not alter the News object.

In this case, you don't have to worry. The second call to News.loadNewInformation will only be executed once the first call completes - that is, excluding executing the callback method. Hence your newItemInfo counter will contain the correct value.

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Try this:

loadNewInformation: function(side) {
    jQuery.get(
        '/api/news/'+ (this.newInfoItems++),
        function(html) {
            jQuery('div.col'+side).append(html);
        }
    );
}
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