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I have XML in the form of a String that contains

<message>HELLO!</message> 

How can I get the String "Hello!" from the XML? It should be ridiculously easy but I am lost. The XML isn't in a doc, it is simply a String.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Using JDOM:

String xml = "<message>HELLO!</message>";
org.jdom.input.SAXBuilder saxBuilder = new SAXBuilder();
try {
    org.jdom.Document doc = saxBuilder.build(new StringReader(xml));
    String message = doc.getRootElement().getText();
    System.out.println(message);
} catch (JDOMException e) {
    // handle JDOMException
} catch (IOException e) {
    // handle IOException
}

Using the Xerces DOMParser:

String xml = "<message>HELLO!</message>";
DOMParser parser = new DOMParser();
try {
    parser.parse(new InputSource(new java.io.StringReader(xml)));
    Document doc = parser.getDocument();
    String message = doc.getDocumentElement().getTextContent();
    System.out.println(message);
} catch (SAXException e) {
    // handle SAXException 
} catch (IOException e) {
    // handle IOException 
}

Using the JAXP interfaces:

String xml = "<message>HELLO!</message>";
DocumentBuilderFactory dbf = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance();
DocumentBuilder db = null;
try {
    db = dbf.newDocumentBuilder();
    InputSource is = new InputSource();
    is.setCharacterStream(new StringReader(xml));
    try {
        Document doc = db.parse(is);
        String message = doc.getDocumentElement().getTextContent();
        System.out.println(message);
    } catch (SAXException e) {
        // handle SAXException
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // handle IOException
    }
} catch (ParserConfigurationException e1) {
    // handle ParserConfigurationException
}
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You could do this with JAXB (an implementation is included in Java SE 6).

import java.io.StringReader;
import javax.xml.bind.*;
import javax.xml.transform.stream.StreamSource;

public class Demo {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        String xmlString = "<message>HELLO!</message> ";
        JAXBContext jc = JAXBContext.newInstance(String.class);
        Unmarshaller unmarshaller = jc.createUnmarshaller();
        StreamSource xmlSource = new StreamSource(new StringReader(xmlString));
        JAXBElement<String> je = unmarshaller.unmarshal(xmlSource, String.class);
        System.out.println(je.getValue());
    }

}

Output

HELLO!
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You could also use tools provided by the base JRE:

String msg = "<message>HELLO!</message>";
DocumentBuilder newDocumentBuilder = DocumentBuilderFactory.newInstance().newDocumentBuilder();
Document parse = newDocumentBuilder.parse(new ByteArrayInputStream(msg.getBytes()));
System.out.println(parse.getFirstChild().getTextContent());
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don't convert to bytes, use a StringReader. –  jtahlborn Dec 14 '11 at 20:28
    
Off topic but DocumentBuilder.parse() only takes an InputStream. I just wanted to write the smallest amount of example code. –  pimaster Dec 15 '11 at 4:34
    
unfortunately, that smallest amount of example code is also grossly wrong. converting xml text to arbitrary bytes using the default platform encoding is a recipe for breaking said xml. as you can see in some of the other answers, you can use an InputSource to pass a Reader to DocumentBuilder. –  jtahlborn Dec 15 '11 at 5:09

There is doing XML reading right, or doing the dodgy just to get by. Doing it right would be using proper document parsing.

Or... dodgy would be using custom text parsing with either wisuzu's response or using regular expressions with matchers.

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unfortunately i have no Java on this pc :/, but here you go http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0573.html

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I think you would be look at String class, there are multiple ways to do it. What about substring(int,int) and indexOf(int) lastIndexOf(int)?

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3  
Probably harmless for such a simple example, but generally the wrong approach for dealing with XML. –  lwburk Dec 7 '11 at 1:18

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