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Is the following code legal? MSVC 9 and g++ 4.4 disagree:

struct base
{
  struct derived {};
};

struct derived : base {};

int main()
{
  typedef derived::derived type;
  return 0;
}

MSVC complains, confusing the nested name for the type's constructor:

c:\dev>cl test.cpp
Microsoft (R) 32-bit C/C++ Optimizing Compiler Version 15.00.30729.01 for 80x86
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation.  All rights reserved.

test.cpp
test.cpp(10) : error C2146: syntax error : missing ';' before identifier 'type'
test.cpp(10) : error C2761: '{ctor}' : member function redeclaration not allowed

test.cpp(10) : error C2065: 'type' : undeclared identifier

While g++ does not:

$ g++ --version test.cpp
g++ (Ubuntu/Linaro 4.4.4-14ubuntu5) 4.4.5
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions.  There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

For context, my code contains an iterator called pointer. To provide the iterator interface, it provides the nested type pointer, which is a synonym for itself.

share|improve this question
    
I believe that typename is illegal in non-templated code, or at least some compilers complain about it. –  Jared Hoberock Dec 6 '11 at 23:59
    
Try it with typedef typename derived::derived type; and see if it works. –  Mark Ransom Dec 7 '11 at 0:00
    
Sorry, I misread your code. By the way, for Comeau your code is illegal (with and without typename), so I'm inclined to think that VC++ is right here. –  Matteo Italia Dec 7 '11 at 0:00
2  
FWIW gcc 4.6.2 doesn't accept the code as well and gives a very descriptive error message. –  pmr Dec 7 '11 at 0:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Comeau thinks that your code is incorrect, so I think that the constructor-interpretation shadowing the type-interpretation is what the standard mandates1.

Still, your code happily compiles if you clear up the ambiguity and tell the compiler that you're trying to access the derived member of the base class:

struct base
{
  struct derived {};
};

struct derived : base {};

int main()
{
  typedef derived::base::derived type;
  return 0;
}

By the way, the fact that the constructor-interpretation prevails kinda makes sense: you have a well-known way to tell the compiler that you want to refer to stuff of the base class (via the scope resolution operator), but you wouldn't have a syntax to do the reverse (forcing the compiler to understand that you're referring to the constructor). So the "constructor-by-default" behavior seems quite sensible.


  1. I may look it up later, but I don't guarantee that I actually will, this kind of pesky name issues are always a mess to look up.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! std::iterator_traits chokes on it, unfortunately. I will have to specialize it I guess. –  Jared Hoberock Dec 7 '11 at 0:06
    
@JaredHoberock: what are you actually trying to do? –  Matteo Italia Dec 7 '11 at 0:10
    
I have a pointer wrapper, pointer<T>, which derives from boost::iterator_adaptor. The pointer wrapper encodes metadata in the type system. –  Jared Hoberock Dec 7 '11 at 0:14

What you have is a coflict in the names. Just rename the second struct to struct derived2. And do this change in main() too: typedef derived2::derived type; It compiles without errors in VC++6.0

struct base
{
  struct derived {};
};

struct derived2 : base {};


int main()
{
  typedef derived2::derived type;
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't check some code for standard conformance with VC++6.0... :S –  Matteo Italia Dec 7 '11 at 0:25

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