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if we cast an object to an interface, won't this object be able to call its own methods? in the following example, myObj will only be able to call MyInterface methods?

MyInterface myObj = new Obj();

If this is correct, what is the difference between those 2 objects :

MyInterface myObj = new Obj();

MyInterface mySec = new Sec();

Thanks for your help

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this might be of help. – Nerdtron Dec 7 '11 at 0:31
up vote 8 down vote accepted
MyInterface myObj = new Obj(); 
MyInterface mySec = new Sec(); 

For this to be legal, both Obj and Sec will have to be implementers of MyInterface. The difference between these two objects would be how they provide that implementation. Obj and Sec could do two very different or very similar things, but their commonality is that they would adhere to a contract that you could rely upon. Consider you have a method

public void doSomethingWith(MyInterface thing) {
     thing.frob();
}

Each object, myObj and mySec, could be passed into this method, and this method could then use that object's frob method (assuming frob is part of the interface declaration). This is liberating. This allows you to do very powerful things, by programming to interfaces and not to implementations. For example, you can extend functionality of classes and not change a line of code in those classes, you simply pass a different implementation of a dependency. You are not tied to, or coupled with, any one implentation inside the method doSomethingWith.

but i also read that if we declare the object myObj as MyInterface, myObj won't be able to use its own methods (from the class Obj), is that correct

Internally, instances of Obj will continue to have full access to the Obj API. myObj is still an Obj, it will always be able to use its own implementation details.

public interface MyInterface {
    void frob();
}

public class Obj implements MyInterface {

    public void frob() {
        doFrobbing();
    }

    private void doFrobbing() {
        System.out.println("frobbing");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyInterface myObj = new Obj();
        myObj.frob(); // still internally calls doFrobbing()
        ((Obj)myObj).doFrobbing(); // visible only via class reference
    }
}

Instances of Obj will still be instances of Obj, and those instances will still be able to use doFrobbing. Externally, persons using those instances via the interface reference will only be able to access the interface methods.

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thanks anthony for this great explanation, i understand this, and even more now thanks, but i also read that if we declare the object myObj as MyInterface, myObj won't be able to use its own methods (from the class Obj), is that correct? – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 1:10
    
@Paul, good question, answer updated. – Anthony Pegram Dec 7 '11 at 1:15
    
thanks for the update, so what's the point to do this? (hiding the Obj's methods when MyInterface is the type) An interface "exists" in order to "add" some methods to an object, right?, so why does it hide the other methods? (or maybe there are no reasons for that, this works because, as a general rule in every programming language, a "type" works like that?) – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 1:32
1  
Those methods are not lost, not in the slightest. Now, while you're operating under the reference of the interface, the non-interface methods will not be visible, but that's not the same as losing the functionality. The issue I think you're running into is that you might be trying to use the interface when it's not warranted (you actually need to directly invoke the non-interface API in a given method), or maybe you have code that is dependent upon too much and is trying to do too much. – Anthony Pegram Dec 7 '11 at 2:17
1  
But remember, just because Obj implements MyInterface, you are not restricted to only ever referring to myObj via the interface. It simply allows you to use an instance of Obj somewhere that needs a MyInterface. That somewhere that needs the interface shouldn't care if its an Obj! If it does care, then it needs Obj, not MyInterface. – Anthony Pegram Dec 7 '11 at 2:19

Only the methods in the interface are visible, but all methods in the object may still be invoked, as long as they're made accessible otherwise. For example:

public interface MyInterface {
    String getName();
}

public class Obj implements MyInterface {
    private String getFirstName() {
        return "John";
    }

    private String getLastName() {
        return "Doe";
    }

    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return getFirstName() + " " + getLastName();
    }
}

public class Sec implements MyInterface {
    private String getDate() {
        return new Date().toString();
    }

    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return getDate();
    }
}

In the above cases, both Obj and Sec can call their private members, even though they will not be visible in other classes. So when you say...

MyInterface myObj = new Obj();
MyInterface mySec = new Sec();

...as you've asked in the question, while it is true that in myObj and mySec the only method visible is getName(), their underlying implementation can be different.

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thanks jonathan for this great explanation, mmh, ok i understand it a bit more, so if Obj's methods are not visible by other classes, in which case does it matter? (do you have a simple example?) – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 1:14
    
Sorry, I'm not certain I understand your question. – Jonathan Newmuis Dec 7 '11 at 2:27

There is no difference. You will only be able to invoke MyInterface interface methods on myObj and mySec. Obviously your code will only compile if both Obj and Sec implement the Myinterface interface.

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thanks for your quick answer, so here's the thing : what if we started the project without interfaces, and then we want to implement an interface because we need more methods to be added on classes A and B : we will lose the previous methods from A and B because we will declare a and b as I's objects... – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 1:22
    
@Paul Interfaces exist for a purpose of adding some common interface (or in other words a contract) to different classes and letting those classes actually implement the functionality according to the contract. You are not actually required to use interfaces if you want to add new methods to a class. Here is a plain definition of what an interface is: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/concepts/interface.html – Strelok Dec 7 '11 at 1:46
    
thanks Strelok, my misunderstanding is about changing the "Type" of an object, and put the interface as the "Type", this would mean that the obj's methods are not "visible" anymore... which confuses me a bit. I've got the principle of interfaces though, i understand that interfaces are some methods that 2 classes will share, but what i'm not sure to understand is : if "Interface" is the type, the other methods from the myObj class won't be visible anymore – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 2:07
MyInterface myObj = new Obj();
MyInterface mySec = new Sec();

You declare an instance of a MyInterface named myObj. You initialize it with new Obj(); which is authorized by the compiler if Obj implements MyInterface. myObj can only call MyInterface methods obviously. Same for the second line.

Here is a sample code to try:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String args[]){
          A a = new A();
          a.say();
          a.a();

          B b = new B();
          b.say();
          b.b();

          I ia = new A();
          ia.say();
          ia.a(); // fail
    }

}

interface i {
    public void say();
}

class A implements i {
    public void say(){
        System.out.println("class A");
    }
    public void a(){
        System.out.println("method a");
    }
}

class B implements i {
    public void say(){
        System.out.println("class B");
    }
    public void b(){
        System.out.println("method b");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks kbdjockey for your answer : okay, but what if we started the project without interfaces, and then we want to implement an interface because we need more methods to be added on classes A and B : we will lose the previous methods from A and B because we will declare a and b as I's objects... – Paul Dec 7 '11 at 1:20
    
Just because A and B implement I doesn't mean you have to instantiate them as such. You can still say A myObj = new A(), and access all methods of A (including those overriden from I). – Jonathan Newmuis Dec 7 '11 at 2:27

In the code you showed you never perform any casts.

A typical use of an interface is to define some methods which will be available, without caring about the concrete implementation.

A nice example of this are the listeners in the standard JDK. For example the PropertyChangeListener. This is an interface which defines a method which can be called when 'a property is changed'. A typical use of this interface is to attach it to a class which has properties, and this class will warn those listeners when one of its properties has changed.

The class does not care what those listeners will do. It only relies on the fact this propertyChange method will be present, and calls that method.

The class can only call this method on the listener, since it only knows about the method defined in the interface. If those listeners have other methods, they can call those methods themself, but that is only because they know they are more then the interface.

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MyInterface mi = new Obj();
mi.getInterfaceMethods(); (methods in the MyInterface)

if(mi instanceof Obj) {
     mi.getObjMethods(); (methods in the Obj)
}
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Changing the type of a variable (i.e. a reference) does not change the object itself. An object can always call its own methods, no matter what the types of declared variables are that reference to it.

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A simple analogy:

Consider a Chef(Interface). And there are Chinese chef(classes) and American chef(classes). Now, there is a Hotel looking out to recruit a chef based on some eligibility criteria such as

  • can cook Non-vegeterian
  • can cook vegeterian
  • have experience of 5 years

Here, the eligibility is the context within which the Chef type person is evaluated(Types functionality). Now, there may be cases where Chinese chef can also cook sea food , Italian dishes etc. so could be the case with American counterpart. All these may seem irrelevant to Hotel manager as he is only concerned with required criteria.

Chefs work in a hotel is analogous to Chef type object utilised in code. The obvious work would be to cook vegeterian and non-vegeterian food(criteria or interface methods). That does not mean that the Hotel cannot utilize the Chinese chef's sea food making skills.

It's just a matter of specifying what skills(functionality) the Hotel is looking for.

Hope you get the idea.

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