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I want to include the some region plots in a Manipulate structure, however the rendering is almost prohibitively slow. The code is

ClearAll[regions, rplot]
r:regions[n_Integer, o_Integer] := r = Apply[And, 
    Subsets[Table[(#1 - Cos[t])^2 + (#2 - Sin[t])^2 <= 1, {t, 2 Pi/n, 
       2 Pi, 2 Pi/n}], {o}], {1}] &
r:rplot[n_Integer, o_Integer] := r = Show[{RegionPlot[
     Evaluate[regions[n, o][x, y]], {x, -2, 2}, {y, -2, 2},
     PlotRange -> {{-2, 2}, {-2, 2}}, PlotRangePadding -> .1, 
     Frame -> False, PlotPoints -> 100], 
    Graphics[Table[Circle[{Cos[t], Sin[t]}, 1], {t, 2 Pi/n, 2 Pi, 2 Pi/n}]]}]

Which produces graphics like

GraphicsGrid[{{rplot[3, 2], rplot[5, 3]}, {rplot[7, 2], rplot[4, 1]}}]

circles from above!

The above takes about 40 seconds to calculate and render on my computer. Can anyone suggest a way to get similar quality graphics more quickly?


Note 1: I've memoized the graphics object so that doesn't need to recalculate it each time in my demonstration - but it's too slow even the first time.
Note 2: I'm happy with rasterized images, so maybe a flood fill type solution would be an option...
Note 3: I need something like Manipulate[ rplot[n, o], {n, 2, 10, 1, Appearance -> "Labeled"}, {{o, 1}, Range[1, (n + 1)/2], ControlType -> RadioButtonBar}] to be usable.

share|improve this question
    
Are the shapes always circles? –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 5:45
    
Yeah - so I just want replacement for rplot that, apart from its speed, is indistinguishable from the above. But, if you have a more general solution, that's also welcome! –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 5:55
    
Simon, I just got done exercising, and my mind is cloudy. You want to color the areas in which n or more circles overlap, with each discrete region colored differently. Is this correct? –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 6:04
    
@Mr.Wizard: Yes. Or, more accurately color the areas where exactly n circles overlap. If the fill is not completely opaque, then the places with more than n overlaps will be darker. –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 6:16
    
(still cloudy) If you don't color the areas where more than n circles overlap, wouldn't those areas be white instead of darker? –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 6:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I previously posted this as an addition to my other answer. It's inspired by Simon's analytic approach, with some modifications to speed things up

intersect[n_, o_] :=
  With[{a = Pi/2 - (o-1) Pi/n},
   If[o-1 >= n/2, Return[{}]]; (* intersection is {} *)
   Polygon[
    Join[Table[{Sin[a] + Sin[phi], (-Cos[a] + Cos[phi])}, {phi, -a, a-2 a/10, 2 a/10}], 
     Table[{Sin[a] + Sin[phi], (Cos[a] - Cos[phi])}, {phi, a, -a+2 a/10, -2 a/10}]]]]

rplot2[n_, o_] := With[{pl = intersect[n, o], opac = .3, col = ColorData[1]},
  Graphics[{{Opacity[opac], 
     Table[{col[k], Rotate[pl, Mod[o - 1, 2] Pi/n + 2 Pi k/n, {0, 0}]}, {k, n}]},
    {Black, Circle[Through[{Re, Im}[Exp[I #]]]] & /@ (Range[n] 2 Pi/n)}}]
 ]

First of all, I'm using that for given value of n and o, the intersection region between the i-th and i+o-1-th circle is the same as the intersection region between the first and o-th circle except for a rotation over an angle 2 Pi (i-1)/n, so it suffices to calculate the region once and use Rotate to rotate the region.

Also, instead of using a ParametricPlot to plot the intersection region, I'm using a Polygon so I only need to calculate some points on the boundary which saves time.

The result for GraphicsGrid[{{rplot2[3, 2], rplot2[5, 2]}, {rplot2[7, 3], rplot2[4, 1]}}] looks like

Intersecting circles revisited

And the timings I get are

rplot2[10, 3]; // Timing

(* ==> {0.0016, Null} *)

compared to those for Simon's solution

rplot[10, 3]; // Timing

(* ==> {0.16519, Null} *)
share|improve this answer

Analytic method

If the circles are always arranged in an even ring with as shown, there should be an analytic solution for the circle-circle intersection. I would start with the number of degrees between each circle as laid out on the ring.

I shall explore this method as time allows.

Raster method

  1. Binary rasterize a series of disks in the correct locations

  2. Assign unique power-of-2 values to each raster in place of ones

  3. Add arrays

  4. Compute unique set of overlaps from the value at each point in the totals array

  5. Map correct colors onto resulting array and generate output


First rough pass of the raster method, simply as a proof of concept. You can see that each region has a unique shading, which is just the sum of rasters at that point.

raster = 
  1 - First@Binarize@Rasterize@Graphics[#, PlotRange -> {{-2, 2}, {-2, 2}}] &;

disks =
  Table[raster @ Disk[{Cos[t], Sin[t]}, 1], {t, 2 Pi/#, 2 Pi, 2 Pi/#}] &;

n = 5;

array = disks[n] * 2^Range[0, n - 1] //Total;

ArrayPlot[array]

enter image description here


Second draft, adding colors. It's still rather clunky.

n = 7; o = 2;

sets = Table[
   NestList[RotateLeft, PadLeft[Table[1, {o + i}], n], n - 1],
   {i, 0, n - o}
   ];

colors = NestList[
   Mean /@ Partition[#, 2, 1, 1] &,
   List @@@ Take[ColorData[4, "ColorList"], n],
   n - o
   ];

rules = Append[Rule @@@ Flatten[{sets, colors}, {{2, 3}}], _ -> {1, 1, 1}];

Replace[Transpose[disks[n], {3, 2, 1}], rules, {2}] // Image

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not experienced at working with rasterized images, which is why I posted the question. –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 7:16
    
As for the analytic method, isn't that what my RegionPlot expression does? I guess I/you could also create parametrized curves and send it to ParametricPlot or to generate Polgons. That might work - just need to calculate the intersection points and then switch between the standard circle parametrizations at those points. –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 7:17
    
@Simon, I am going to add a very basic example of the raster method in a minute. RegionPlot just maps out a function space more than anything, as far as I can recall; it is not actually solving an intersection equation. –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 7:44

You could do something like this

rplot[n_Integer, o_Integer] :=  Module[{centres, masks, opacity = .3, 
   colours, region, img, createmask},
  centres = Table[Through[{Re, Im}[Exp[I t]]], {t, 2 Pi/n, 2 Pi, 2 Pi/n}];
  createmask[centres_] := Fold[ImageMultiply, #[[1]], Rest[#]] &@ 
     (ColorNegate[ Image[Graphics[Disk[#, 1], PlotRange -> {{-2, 2}, {-2, 2}}, 
          PlotRangePadding -> .1], ColorSpace -> "Grayscale"]] & /@ centres);
  masks = createmask /@ Subsets[centres, {o}];
  colours = PadRight[#, Length[masks], #] & @ (List @@@ ColorData[1, "ColorList"]);
  region[img_, col_] := 
   SetAlphaChannel[ColorCombine[ImageMultiply[img, #] & /@ col, "RGB"], 
    ImageMultiply[img, opacity]];
  img = Fold[ImageCompose, #[[1]], Rest[#]] &@(MapThread[region, {masks, colours}]);
  Overlay[{img, Graphics[Circle[#, 1] & /@ centres, PlotRangePadding -> .1, 
     PlotRange -> {{-2, 2}, {-2, 2}}]}]
 ]

Then GraphicsGrid[{{rplot[3, 2], rplot[5, 3]}, {rplot[7, 2], rplot[4, 1]}}] produces something like

cross sections of circles

Edit

Moved previous edit to separate answer.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks good, but it doesn't work in version 7. Is this possible without SetAlphaChannel and Overlay? –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 11:14
    
Looks cool! Now I just need to figure out how it works... –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 11:15
1  
@Mr.Wizard: It works fine! It's about 10 times faster than the RegionPlot code and about 5 times slower than the ParametricPlot solution. Heike: Now that I've had time to parse the code, it's a nice approach. Thanks! –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 12:00
1  
@Simon now you're handing out parasites? :o) (I learned it as check mark.) –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 22:36
1  
Heike, I'd like to see a solution using FilledCurve, though it won't work in v7. –  Mr.Wizard Dec 8 '11 at 1:04

Mr. Wizard made me realize that although I had an analytic form for the areas that I could use in RegionPlot, if I obtained a parametrized form for the boundaries, then I could use ParametricPlot. So, let's do that!

The ith (i=0,...,n-1) circle is parametrized in the complex plane by
Exp[I t] + Exp[2 i Pi I / n] for t in [0, 2 Pi].

We can solve to find the intersection of the ith and the (i+o-1)th circles, where o is the number of overlaps, as in the original code of the question. This gives the points at

point[n_, o_, i_] := {Cos[(2 i Pi)/n] + Cos[(2 Pi (i + o - 1))/n], 
                      Sin[(2 i Pi)/n] + Sin[(2 Pi (i + o - 1))/n]}

Now we can parametrize the arcs going from the origin to a point[n,o,i] and reflect them across the line going from the origin to a point[n,o,i]. Interpolating between the two with a parameter s gives the parametrized regions

area[n_, o_, i_, t_, s_] := With[{a = 2 Sin[((2 + n - 2 o) (1 - t) )/(2 n) Pi], 
   b = (2 - 4 i + 2 t + n t - 2 o (1 + t))/(2 n) Pi, 
   c = ((2 + n - 2 o) (1 - t) - 4 i)/(2 n) Pi}, 
   {a (s Cos[b] + (1 - s) Sin[c]) , -a (s Sin[b] - (1 - s) Cos[c])}]

Then we can define

rplot[n_Integer, o_Integer] := ParametricPlot[Evaluate[
  Table[area[n, o, i, t, s], {i, 0, n - 1}]], {t, 0, 1}, {s, 0, 1},
  Mesh -> False, MaxRecursion -> 1, Frame -> False, Axes -> False, 
  PlotRange -> 2.1 {{-1, 1}, {-1, 1}},
  Epilog -> {Table[Circle[{Cos[t], Sin[t]}, 1], {t, 0, 2 Pi (n-1)/n, 2 Pi/n}],
    Red, Point[Table[point[n, o, i], {i, 1, n}]]}]

And GraphicsGrid[{{rplot[3, 2], rplot[5, 3]}, {rplot[7, 2], rplot[4, 1]}}] produces

graphics grid

share|improve this answer
    
Surely this is the correct approach. Well done. –  Mr.Wizard Dec 7 '11 at 11:50
    
+1 Much more elegant than my approach –  Heike Dec 7 '11 at 12:00
    
@Mr.Wizard: I just needed the right hint (thanks for that) and a dinner break! –  Simon Dec 7 '11 at 12:00

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