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The following code snippet is causing a compilation error that I am unable to pinpoint. I tried removing the 2 from the last brace. I tried the AntiForgery without braces - no luck.

The error is CS1501: No overload for method 'Write' takes 0 arguments

Any suggestions?

<div id="header-wrapper">
    <div id="header">
        <div id="menu-wrapper">
            @if (Page.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated){
                @Html.Telerik().Menu().Name("mainnav").BindTo("main").Effects(x => x.Toggle())
            }     
        </div>
        @if (Page.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated){
            <form action="@Url.Action("Logoff", "Account")" id="formLogout" method="POST">
                @{ Html.AntiForgeryToken(); }
                <a href="" id="logout" onclick="$('#formLogout').submit();return false;"></a>
            </form>
        @}
        <div id="subnav"></div>
    </div>
</div>

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try replacing:

@{ Html.AntiForgeryToken(); }

with:

@Html.AntiForgeryToken()

(and remove the @ from your if closing brace)

Code should be:

@if (Page.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated) {
  <form action="@Url.Action("Logoff", "Account")" id="formLogout" method="POST">
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    <a href="" id="logout" onclick="$('#formLogout').submit();return false;"></a>
  </form>
}
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That worked! I was sure that I already tried it, but I obviously did not. –  Leons Dec 7 '11 at 3:23

Since Chris answered your problem, I'd like to point out several improvements to your code. Your code could be written this way:

@if (Page.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated){
 using (Html.BeginForm("Logoff", "Account", FormMethod.Post, new { id="formLogout" }) {
     Html.AntiForgeryToken();
     <a href="" id="logout">Logout</a>
 }
}

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function() {
        $('#formLogout').click(function() { 
            $('#formLogout').submit(); return false; 
        });
    }};
</script>

This does a few things. First, it simplifies your markup. This is known as "unobtrusive" javascript, because it removes all those ugly "onclick" and other kinds of javascript related events.

Secondly, it seperates your javascript logic from your markup, making it easier to maintain.

Notice also that i'm using the BeginForm html helper, which simplifies your markup as well. Notice how there's only a single @ sign in the entire block?

share|improve this answer
    
This is so much cleaner and definitely easier to maintain. +1 for making the improvement suggestions. –  Leons Dec 7 '11 at 12:21

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