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so simple, if I create my function as CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION MD5_ENCODE it will run smoothly, but if it stays anonymously within the SQL-Plus block as PL/SQL --> "may not be a function" error.

What is this Oracle "feature" again?

DECLARE

FUNCTION MD5_ENCODE(CLEARTEXT IN VARCHAR2) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS    
    CHK VARCHAR2(16);   
    HEX VARCHAR2(32);  
    I   INTEGER;  
    C   INTEGER;  
    H   INTEGER;  
BEGIN
    IF CLEARTEXT IS NULL THEN
        RETURN '';
    ELSE
        CHK := DBMS_OBFUSCATION_TOOLKIT.MD5(INPUT_STRING
=> CLEARTEXT);
        FOR I IN 1 .. 16 LOOP
            C := ASCII(SUBSTR(CHK, I, 1));
            H := TRUNC(C / 16);
            IF H >= 10 THEN
                HEX := HEX || CHR(H + 55);
            ELSE
                HEX := HEX || CHR(H + 48);
            END IF;
            H := MOD(C, 16);
            IF H >= 10 THEN
                HEX := HEX || CHR(H + 55);
            ELSE
                HEX := HEX || CHR(H + 48);
            END IF;
        END LOOP;  
        RETURN HEX;  
    END IF;  

END;  

BEGIN  
    UPDATE ADDRESSES_T SET STREET = MD5ENCODE(STREET) ;  

-- etc...  
END   
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3 Answers

In order to call a function within a SQL statement, it needs to exist as a function object within the database. The SQL statement is parsed and executed separately from your PL/SQL code, so it doesn't have access to the locally defined function.

If you really don't want to create the function object, you could use a cursor to loop over the rows in the table, execute the function in a PL/SQL statement, and update each row as you go.

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but I did the same thing with a PROCEDURE, with success. why differently between PROCEDURE & FUNCTION? –  yli May 8 '09 at 18:40
    
You would have to show me an example of what you did. As far as I know, you can't call a PROCEDURE within a SQL statement at all. –  Dave Costa May 8 '09 at 18:51
1  
Detected the reason, as in: forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=245112 There are a number of things it could be. My #1 candidate is, we can only use functions in SQL statements that are public i.e. declared in a package spec. This is the case even for SQL statements executed within the same Package Body. The reson is that SQL statements are executed by a different engine which can only see publicly declared functions. –  yli May 11 '09 at 14:22
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=245112

There are a number of things it could be.

My #1 candidate is, we can only use functions in SQL statements that are public i.e. declared in a package spec. This is the case even for SQL statements executed within the same Package Body. The reson is that SQL statements are executed by a different engine which can only see publicly declared functions.


Long story short, function must be defined in a package, like CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION MD5ENCODE(IN_TEXT IN VARCHAR2) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS ...

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1  
-1 incorrect. You can call a function from SQL and it doesn't have to be in a package spec. –  Jeffrey Kemp Feb 21 '13 at 3:18
    
Contradicting @JeffreyKemp, this fixed me up. I added my function to the spec and suddenly I stopped getting "function FOO may not be used in SQL". If the function is not in the spec then it can only be called from pl/sql not from sql. SQL can only call public functions hence why it had to be in the spec. –  Gabriel Jun 7 '13 at 19:30
    
Following up, here's an AskTom about this: asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/… –  Gabriel Jun 7 '13 at 20:10
    
@Gabriel, I've been wrong before, but not this time. I said "you can call a function from SQL and it doesn't have to be in a package spec". Try CREATE FUNCTION myfunc RETURN NUMBER BEGIN RETURN 1; END; and then run SELECT myfunc FROM DUAL;. It will work. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 8 '13 at 0:09
    
In other words, if you want to put the function in a package but call it from SQL, you must declare it in the package spec. But, you don't have to put the function in the package if you don't want to. You can create the function as a separate schema object on its own, outside the package. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 8 '13 at 0:12
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Your first problem is you have a typo.

FUNCTION MD5_ENCODE(CLEARTEXT IN VARCHAR2) RETURN VARCHAR2 IS

versus

UPDATE ADDRESSES_T SET STREET = MD5ENCODE(STREET) ;

You are missing the underscore in the function call in the update statement.

The next error you will encounter is :

PLS-00231: function 'MD5_ENCODE' may not be used in SQL

So you can simply assign the function results to a variable and use it in the Update statement.

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not a typo error. I corrected it. PLS-00231 "function 'md5encode' may not be used in SQL" –  yli May 11 '09 at 14:01
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