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Here's my code:

Composer& Database::GetComposer (string in_last_name)
{   
    for (int i = 0; i < next_slot_; i++)
    {
        if (composers_[i].last_name() == in_last_name)
             return composers_[i];
    }
}

The idea is to iterate over an array of Composer objects and return a reference to the object whose last_name field matches "in_last_name." I understand what the warning is telling me, namely that it's possible that the function won't return anything (if, say, the user provides an invalid last name). My question is, how can I avoid this? I tried adding "return 0" and "return NULL" after the for loop and it wouldn't compile. Should this method throw an exception if it finds nothing?

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1  
You should throw an exception. –  Kerrek SB Dec 7 '11 at 4:36
1  
Warnings are really logical errors in your code. Fix all warnings (and turn up the warning level to as high as (reasonably) possible) –  Loki Astari Dec 7 '11 at 4:48
    
I still get the same warning even with a try/catch block throwing a standard exception. –  wbr Dec 7 '11 at 5:00
    
I should note that I only get the warning when I compile in eclipse, not when I use g++ from the command line. –  wbr Dec 7 '11 at 5:01
    
@wbr: gcc does not warn much, by default. Eclipse probably adds some options to the command line to turn on the warnings that are most useful. As for you remark on throw: there is no need to write a try/catch block to throw, the try/catch is meant to catch... you should read a bit more on exceptions syntax. –  Matthieu M. Dec 7 '11 at 7:39
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1 Answer

Your function is declared to return a Composer&, that is, a reference to a Composer. If your function fails to return a suitable reference, and the caller tries to use the return value for something, undefined behaviour will result.

If your function may legitimately fail to find what it's looking for, you may want to change the return type to a pointer instead of a reference. That would give you the option to return NULL:

Composer* Database::GetComposer (string in_last_name)
{   
    for (int i = 0; i < next_slot_; i++)
    {
        if (composers_[i].last_name() == in_last_name)
             return &composers_[i];
    }
    return NULL;
}

Alternatively, you could throw an exception when your function fails to find the target.

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When I do that, I get the following error message: "invalid initialization of non-const reference of type 'Composer&' from an rvalue of type 'int'" –  wbr Dec 7 '11 at 4:43
    
On which source line do you get that error? –  Greg Hewgill Dec 7 '11 at 4:48
    
On the same line as the return NULL statement. –  wbr Dec 7 '11 at 4:49
    
Did you change the type of your function from Composer& to Composer*? –  Greg Hewgill Dec 7 '11 at 4:51
    
Aha. I missed that part. That clears this bit of code, but now it's cascading through the rest of my program. I'll see if I can clear it up. –  wbr Dec 7 '11 at 4:54
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