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Thanks ahead of time for the help

Description: The program draws, displays, and saves an image. It works as following: the object itself extends Frame. In the constructor, the object creates a BufferedImage, and calls a method that draw onto that image. Then, it displays the image onto the Frame. Finally, it saves the image into a file (I don't care what format it uses). The main program creates the object, which does the rest.

Problem: The saved file always has a colored background! This is especially wierd since the displayed image is fine. If I use "jpg" format with ImageIO.write(), the background is reddish. If I use the "png" format, the background is dark grey.

I've spent a while on this, and I still have no idea what the hell is happening!

    import java.awt.Frame ;
    import java.awt.image.BufferedImage ;
    import java.io.IOException ;
    import java.awt.event.WindowEvent ;
    import java.awt.event.WindowAdapter ;
    import java.awt.Toolkit ;
    import java.awt.Graphics2D ;
    import java.awt.Graphics ;
    import java.awt.Color ;
    import java.awt.Dimension ;
    import javax.imageio.ImageIO ;
    import java.io.File ;
    import java.awt.geom.Rectangle2D;

    public class HGrapher extends Frame{
       private BufferedImage img ;
       private float colors[][] ; //the colors for every rectangle
       private double availWidth ;
       private double availHeight ;


       public HGrapher(String saveFileName, int numRects) throws IOException {
          //*add window closer
          addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
             public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e) {
                System.exit(0);            }
          });

          //*get colors to use
          setColors( numRects) ;

          //*figure out the size of the image and frame
          this.availHeight = (3.0/4) * Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize().height ;
          this.availWidth = (3.0/4) * Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().getScreenSize().width ;

          //*create the image
          this.img = new BufferedImage( (int)availWidth, (int)availHeight, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);
          Graphics2D drawer = img.createGraphics() ;
          drawer.setBackground(Color.WHITE);

          this.makeImg( drawer) ;
          //*display the image
          this.setSize( new Dimension( (int)availWidth, (int)availHeight ) ) ;
          this.setVisible(true);

          //*save the image
          ImageIO.write(img, "jpg",new File( (saveFileName +".jpg") ) );
       }


       //*draws the image by filling rectangles whose color are specified by this.colors
       public void makeImg( Graphics2D drawer) {
          double rectWidth = this.availWidth / (double)colors.length ;
          for(int i = 0 ; i < colors.length ; i ++) {
             drawer.setColor( new Color( this.colors[i][0], this.colors[i][1], this.colors[i][2],
                                         this.colors[i][3] ) ) ;
             drawer.fill( new Rectangle2D.Double( rectWidth*i, 0, rectWidth, this.availHeight ) ) ;
          }
       }


       //*paint method
       public void paint(Graphics g) {
          Graphics2D drawer = (Graphics2D)g ;
          drawer.drawImage(img, 0, 0, null) ;
       }


       //*creates an array of the colors rectangles are filled with
       public void setColors( int numRects) {
          this.colors = new float[ numRects][4] ;
          //*make every 1st rect red
          for(int i = 0 ; i< colors.length ; i+= 3) {
             this.colors[i][0] = (float).8 ; this.colors[i][1] = (float).1 ; this.colors[i][2] = (float).1 ;
             this.colors[i][3] = (float).8 ;      }
          //*make every 2nd rect green
          for(int i = 1 ; i< colors.length ; i+= 3) {
             this.colors[i][0] = (float).1 ; this.colors[i][1] = (float).8 ; this.colors[i][2] = (float).1 ;
             this.colors[i][3] = (float).8 ;      }
          //*make every 3rd rect
          for(int i = 2 ; i< colors.length ; i+= 3) {
             this.colors[i][0] = (float).1 ; this.colors[i][1] = (float).1 ; this.colors[i][2] = (float).8 ;
             this.colors[i][3] = (float).8 ;      }
       }




       public static void main (String[]args) throws IOException {
          HGrapher hg = new HGrapher("saved", 14) ;
       }

    }
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

setBackground() only set the Color that is used to clear the image, it does not actually clear the image. Call Graphics.clearRect(int,int,int,int) after setBackground(). Like so:

//*create the image
this.img = new BufferedImage( (int)availWidth, (int)availHeight, BufferedImage.TYPE_INT_ARGB);
Graphics2D drawer = img.createGraphics() ;
drawer.setBackground(Color.WHITE);
drawer.clearRect(0,0,(int)availWidth,(int)availHeight);
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1  
Thanks a bunch Peter! That approach does not work with a .jpg format (results in a pure black image) but it does work with a .png format, which is good enough for me! I'm partially inclined to ask why it works with one format and not another... anyway, thanks Peter! –  whearyou Dec 7 '11 at 6:17
    
clearRect() probably leaves an alpha value of 0. JPG does not support transparency and probably defaults to black if something has an alpha of 0. You can use setColor() and fillRect() instead of setBackground() and clearRect() to make it work with JPGs –  PeterT Dec 7 '11 at 6:20

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