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I wrote a code for writing the content to the mapped buffer which mapped by using the mmap() system call. After I did some the changes in the mapped buffer,then I called the msync().It should update to the file on disk.

But,It doesn't made any changes to the file on disk.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<unistd.h> 
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include<sys/mman.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#define FILEMODE S_IRWXU | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH
#define MAX 150

main(int argc,char *argv[])
{
int fd,ret,len;
long int len_file;
struct stat st;
char *addr;
char buf[MAX];


if(argc > 1)
{
    if((fd = open(argv[1],O_RDWR | O_APPEND | O_CREAT ,FILEMODE)) < 0)
        perror("Error in file opening");

    if((ret=fstat(fd,&st)) < 0)
        perror("Error in fstat");

    len_file = st.st_size;

           /*len_file having the total length of the file(fd).*/


    if((addr=mmap(NULL,len_file,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_PRIVATE,fd,0)) == MAP_FAILED)
        perror("Error in mmap");

    len = len_file; 

    while((fgets(buf,MAX,stdin)) != NULL)
    {
        strcat(addr+len,buf);
        printf( "Val:%s\n",addr ) ; //Checking purpose
        len = len + (strlen(buf));
    }
    if((msync(addr,len,MS_SYNC)) < 0)
        perror("Error in msync");

    if( munmap(addr,len) == -1)
        printf("Error:\n");
    printf("addr %p\n",addr);
}
else
{
    printf("Usage a.out <filename>\n");
}
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If you want your changes to be reflected in the on-disk file, you must map the file as MAP_SHARED, not MAP_PRIVATE.

Additionally, you cannot extend the file simply by writing beyond the end of the mapping. You must use ftruncate() to extend the file to the new size, then change the mapping to include the new portion of the file. The portable way to change the mapping is to unmap the mapping then recreate it with the new size; on Linux you can instead use mremap().

Your len and len_file variables should be of type size_t, and you should use memcpy() rather than strcat(), since you know exactly the length of the string, exactly where you want to copy it, and you don't want to copy the null-terminator.

The following modification of your code works on Linux (using mremap()) :

#define _GNU_SOURCE
#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<unistd.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include<sys/mman.h>
#include<fcntl.h>
#define FILEMODE S_IRWXU | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH
#define MAX 150

int main(int argc,char *argv[])
{
    int fd, ret;
    size_t len_file, len;
    struct stat st;
    char *addr;
    char buf[MAX];

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        printf("Usage a.out <filename>\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    if ((fd = open(argv[1],O_RDWR | O_CREAT, FILEMODE)) < 0)
    {
        perror("Error in file opening");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    if ((ret = fstat(fd,&st)) < 0)
    {
        perror("Error in fstat");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    len_file = st.st_size;

    /*len_file having the total length of the file(fd).*/

    if ((addr = mmap(NULL,len_file,PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE,MAP_SHARED,fd,0)) == MAP_FAILED)
    {
        perror("Error in mmap");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    while ((fgets(buf,MAX,stdin)) != NULL)
    {
        len = len_file;
        len_file += strlen(buf);
        if (ftruncate(fd, len_file) != 0)
        {
            perror("Error extending file");
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
        if ((addr = mremap(addr, len, len_file, MREMAP_MAYMOVE)) == MAP_FAILED)
        {
            perror("Error extending mapping");
            return EXIT_FAILURE;
        }
        memcpy(addr+len, buf, len_file - len);
        printf( "Val:%s\n",addr ) ; //Checking purpose
    }
    if((msync(addr,len,MS_SYNC)) < 0)
        perror("Error in msync");

    if( munmap(addr,len) == -1)
        perror("Error in munmap");

    printf("addr %p\n",addr);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried that also.It is not working. –  sat Dec 7 '11 at 7:25
    
Great..It is working fine..Thank you. –  sat Dec 7 '11 at 8:29

Note that you've provided a mapping for the file that is exactly the size of the file. If you create the file in your call to open(2), it will have a length of 0, and I wouldn't be surprised if the kernel doesn't bother setting up any kind of memory mapping from a 0 length mapping. (Maybe it does? I've never tried...)

I would suggest using ftruncate(2) to extend the length of your file before performing the mapping. (Note that extending files using ftruncate(2) isn't very portable; not all platforms provide extending functionality and not all filesystem drivers support the extending functionality. See your system's manpage for details.)

You must use the MAP_SHARED mapping for your file modifications to be saved to disk.

Your use of perror(3) isn't quite correct; perror(3) will not terminate your program, so it will continue executing with incorrect assumptions:

if((ret=fstat(fd,&st)) < 0)
    perror("Error in fstat");

Should read:

if((ret=fstat(fd,&st)) < 0) {
    perror("Error in fstat");
    exit(1);
}

(Or exit(EXIT_FAILURE) if you want to be more portable -- I find that a little harder on the eyes but I live in Linux-land.)

strcat(3) expects to find an ASCII NUL character (byte value 0x00, C representation '\0') -- the usual C end-of-string marker -- at the end of the dest string. Your file will not contain an ASCII NUL if you create it in this program -- its length is zero, after all -- and I don't know the consequences of trying to read a zero-byte file via mmap(2). If the file already exists and has data in it, it probably doesn't have an ASCII NUL encoded in the file. strcat(3) is almost certainly the wrong tool to write into your file. (No one wants ASCII NULs in their files anyway.) Try memcpy(3) instead.

share|improve this answer
    
From an anonymous reviewer: The original author confused "file is append-only" with "fd is opened in append mode". A file becomes append-only e.g. running chattr +a THEFILE in a shell. O_APPEND dictates the behavior of the write system call, but not memory mappings. -- edited to remove the MAP_SHARED bit as a result. :) –  sarnold Feb 6 '13 at 20:24

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