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I've been banging my head hard over this...I create a pointer in main(), which I pass on to another function. Inside that function, the pointer is used to create a new array (using the new operator), the array is filled, and the function ends.

If I then try to access elements in the new array in the caller, I get a segfault. Since the new operator was used, I expect the new array to be on the heap and thus not cleared by it going out of scope...I really don't get this. What am I overlooking? I also don't know precisely what to google for, so no luck there yet.

I can get it to work if I let the function return the pointer (instead of passing it), but I don't want to do that because eventually I'd like my function to create a few such newly created arrays. So what am I missing here?

Here is a minimal working example:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>

bool getData(double *myData)
{
    myData = new double[2];
    if (!myData)
        return false;

    myData[0] = +4.53;
    myData[1] = -3.25;    
    return true;
}


int main()
{
    double *myData = NULL;
    if (!getData(myData))
        fprintf(stderr, "Could not get data.\n");

    std::cout << myData[0] << std::endl;
    std::cout << myData[1] << std::endl;

    delete [] myData;    
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Root Cause of the Crash:
When you pass a pointer to the function by value. An copy of the pointer gets passed to the function. Further You allocate memory to the copy of pointer passed through main, this pointer is not same as the one you access in main, it is an copy. The pointer myData in main was never allocated any memory, so eventually you are dereferencing a NULL pointer which results in a Undefined Behavior and an crash.

Suggested Solution 1:

Pass the pointer by Reference:

bool getData(double *&myData)
                     ^

And you are good to go.This is the C++ way of doing it.

Another Solution:

You could also do:

bool getData(double **myData) 
                    ^
{
     *myData = new double[2];
      //so on
}

while calling it as:

getData(&myData); 
        ^

A word of caution:
new does not return NULL in case of failure to allocate memory. It throws a std::bad_alloc exception. So you need to handle that exception or in case you want to check for null you should use the nothrow version of new.

share|improve this answer
    
The most complete answer of all. Thank you kind sir! –  Rody Oldenhuis Dec 7 '11 at 7:56

You have to pass a double** as myData, to initialize correctly your array. Currently, your getData function creates an array and stores its value in the copied parameter, so myData in main is not modified. Your must pass the pointer of myData and modify it with

bool getData(double** myData)
{
    *pmyData = new double[2];
    ...
}

and call getData in main:

getData(&myData);
share|improve this answer
    
This is essentially the same as passing a reference to the pointer, as others suggested, only syntactically more verbose...I've always preferred referencing :) –  Rody Oldenhuis Dec 7 '11 at 7:52
    
My intent was to highlight the problem, I used pointers to make it clearer. I agree with you, but referencing is not always easy to understand for beginners. –  neodelphi Dec 14 '11 at 22:58

The pointer argument to getData() is passed by value, not by reference. This means you're pushing the value (== the address the pointer points to) on the stack and call getData. Inside getData you overwrite this value with the return value from new[]. This value is no longer valid after returning from the function as it only existed on the stack.

Try to pass a reference or pointer to the pointer:

bool getData(double *&myData)
{
    myData = new double[2];
    if (!myData)
        return false;

    myData[0] = +4.53;
    myData[1] = -3.25;    
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ah dang! Silly me, I knew it was something as simple as that. Thanks, this works brilliantly. –  Rody Oldenhuis Dec 7 '11 at 7:47

The myData given as parameter to getData function is passed on stack as a copy. When modifying that value in getData function you actually modify the value from the stack.

When you return to the main function everything is as it was before (except a memory leak).

The quickest solution would be to change the getData function like this:

bool getData(double *&myData)

and you're all set.

share|improve this answer

You pass the pointer into your function by value, not reference. Try this:

bool getData(double* &myData)
{
    ...
}

The difference is that myData is now a reference to the pointer in main, not a copy of it that gets destroyed when the function exits.

share|improve this answer
    
A) That's a pointer to a reference, which is illegal. B) I personally feel that pointers are confusing enough as they are even to seasoned programmers without declaring stuff like T*&p. Just my opinion. –  Assaf Levy Dec 7 '11 at 7:41
    
@AssafLevy: you're right, it's a typo. Corrected. –  Codie CodeMonkey Dec 7 '11 at 7:45

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