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I have such a class:

public static class CacheManager
{
    static object lockObject = new object();

    static MemcachedClient CacheObject
    {
        get
        {
            if (!MemcachedClient.Exists(Settings.Default
                .CacheInstanceName))
            {
                MemcachedClient.Setup(Settings.Default
                    .CacheInstanceName,
                        new string[] {Settings.Default
                            .CacheHostAddress});
            }
            //
            //
            return MemcachedClient.GetInstance(Settings
                .Default.CacheInstanceName);
        }
    }

    public static List<TData> Get<TData>(string key, Func<List<int>> getListCallback,
        Func<int, TData> getItemCallback) where TData : class
    {
        var result = new List<TData>();
        //
        //
        var list = CacheObject.Get(key);
        if (list == null)
        {
            lock (lockObject)
            {
                list = CacheObject.Get(key);
                if (list == null)
                {
                    list = getListCallback();
                    CacheObject.Set(key, list);
                    //
                    //
                    foreach (var id in (List<int>)list)
                    {
                        var item = getItemCallback(id);
                        result.Add(item);
                        CacheObject.Set(string.Concat(key, id), item);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        else
        {
            foreach (var id in (List<int>)list)
            {
                var itemKey = string.Concat(key, id);
                //
                //
                var item = CacheObject.Get(itemKey);
                if (item == null)
                {
                    lock (lockObject)
                    {
                        item = CacheObject.Get(itemKey);
                        if (item == null)
                        {
                            item = getItemCallback(id);
                            CacheObject.Set(itemKey, item);
                        }
                    }
                }
                //
                //
                result.Add((TData)item);
            }
        }
        //
        //
        return (List<TData>)result;
    }

    public static void Remove(string key)
    {
        CacheObject.Delete(key);
    }
}

it is used in classes-repositories:

public class NewsRepository : BaseRepository, IRepository
{

    public List<News> FindAll()
    {
        return CacheManager.Get<News>(key,
            () => clientEntities.News.OrderByDescending(n => n.DateCreated).Select(n => n.NewsId).ToList(),
            (id) => clientEntities.News.Single(n => n.NewsId == id));
    }
}
public class PagesRepository : BaseRepository
{
    public List<Page> FindAll()
    {

        return CacheManager.Get<Page>(key,
            () => clientEntities.Pages.OrderBy(p => p.PageId).Select(p => p.PageId).ToList(),
            (id) => clientEntities.Pages.Single(p => p.PageId == id));
    }
}

my question is: for example NewsRepository didn't find news in cache and got the lock and began to load data but at this moment PagesRepository didn't find pages in cache. will PagesRepository's CacheManager be locked by NewsRepository or (I think so) NewsRepository's CacheManager is another static class and its internal locks do not touch PagesRepository's CacheManager?

share|improve this question
    
Careful with double-check locking. The memory that holds the value that you're checking to be null or not needs to be declared volatile, otherwise the CLR memory model doesn't guarantee that out-of-order memory writes will work correctly. I avoid double-check locks for that reason. –  RickNZ Dec 7 '11 at 8:21
    
@RickNZ, you are talking about the following? | var list = CacheObject.Get(key); if (list == null) { lock (lockObject) { list = CacheObject.Get(key); if (list == null) { ... | Could you describe the problem a bit in detail or give me some links to read about this? –  donRumatta Dec 7 '11 at 11:12
    
Yes, that's the code I'm talking about. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff650316.aspx –  RickNZ Dec 7 '11 at 21:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

A static field of a non-generic type (that is itself not nested in a generic type etc) exists only once, so all the locks will conflict.

If (comments) your aim is to make the lock per-type (from the generic method), then perhaps the best way to do that is:

public static class CacheManager {
    static class TypeLock<T> {
        public static readonly object SyncLock = new object();
    }
    ...
    void SomeGenericMethod<TData>(args) {
       ...
       lock(TypeLock<TData>.SyncLock) {
          ...
       }
       ...
    }
}

Here, SyncLock exists once (and only once) per T, so per TData. This allows you to keep your existing API (where CacheManager is non-generic).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i'll act in this way(= –  donRumatta Dec 7 '11 at 8:31
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Both will use the same reference to lockObject, and therefore the same lock.

share|improve this answer
    
but if i make all my CacheManager class generic? –  donRumatta Dec 7 '11 at 7:39
1  
If CacheManager is generic, then there's a lockObject by generic type. CacheManager<T1>.lockObject != CacheManager<T2>.lockObject –  KooKiz Dec 7 '11 at 7:51
    
should the comment above start "If CacheManager is generic, ..." ? –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '11 at 8:10
    
@MarcGravell uh right, my mistake. Thanks for pointing it out. But somehow it looks like I can't edit this comment anymore... –  KooKiz Dec 7 '11 at 8:13
    
not to worry... I can ;p –  Marc Gravell Dec 7 '11 at 8:19
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