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Given that you have a control that fires a command:

<Button Command="New"/>

Is there a way to prevent the command from being fired twice if the user double clicks on the command?

EDIT: What is significant in this case is that I am using the Commanding model in WPF.

It appears that whenever the button is pressed, the command is executed. I do not see any way of preventing this besides disabling or hiding the button.

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There doesn't appear to be anyway to adjust/override WPF's internal handling of the click event? –  Josh G May 8 '09 at 19:27

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perhaps the button should disabled after the first click and until the processing has been completed?

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I believe this is essentially what I will need to do. –  Josh G May 8 '09 at 20:43

The checked answer to this question, submitted by vidalsasoon, is wrong and it is wrong for all of the various ways this same question has been asked.

It is possible that any event handler that contains code that requires a significant process time, can result in a delay to the disabling of the button at question; regardless to where the disabling line of code is called within the handler.

Try the proofs below and you will see that disable/enable has no correlation to the registration of events. The button click event is still registered and is still handled.

Proof by Contradiction 1

private int _count = 0;

private void btnStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    btnStart.Enabled = false;

    _count++;
    label1.Text = _count.ToString();

    while (_count < 10)
    {            
        btnStart_Click(sender, e);            
    }           

    btnStart.Enabled = true;

}

Proof by Contradition 2

private void form1_load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    btnTest.Enabled = false;
}

private void btnStart_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    btnTest.Enabled = false;

    btnTest_click(sender, e);

    btnTest_click(sender, e);

    btnTest_click(sender, e);

    btnTest.Enabled = true;

}

private int _count = 0;

private void btnTest_click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    _count++;
    label1.Text = _count.ToString();
}
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The OP is using MVVM (binding) and Commands for WPF. You're using the WinForms "events" approach which doesn't apply here. –  vidalsasoon Aug 28 at 12:51
    
@vidalsasoon You are correct that I used Winforms as a demonstration. They key point, however, is that event registration is isolated from other controls/buttons enable or disable property and disabling a button will not prevent an subscribed event handler from executing code. This is true for WPF and Winforms. I was simply trying to point out that the checked answer on this post is not correct. No offense intended. I have made the mistake myself. –  JDennis Aug 28 at 16:45

Assuming that WPF Commanding doesn't give you enough control to mess with the click handler, could you put some code in the command handler that remembers the last time the command was executed and exits if it is requested within a given time period? (code example below)

The idea is that if it's a double-click, you'll receive the event twice within milliseconds, so ignore the second event.

Something like: (inside of the Command)


// warning:  I haven't tried compiling this, but it should be pretty close
DateTime LastInvoked = DateTime.MinDate;
Timespan InvokeDelay = Timespan.FromMilliseconds(100);
{
  if(DateTime.Now - LastInvoked <= InvokeDelay)
     return;

  // do your work
}

(note: if it were just a plain old click handler, I'd say follow this advice: http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2009/04/29/9574643.aspx )

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Good link. The debouncing technique that your refer to is precisely what I am talking about. Turns out our WPF program misperforms sometimes if you double click on buttons that were intended to be singly clicked. –  Josh G May 8 '09 at 20:42

You can use the EventToCommand class in the MVVMLightToolkit to prevent this.

Handle the Click event and send it through EventToCommand from your view to your viewmodel (you can use EventTrigger to do this).
Set MustToggleIsEnabled="True" in your view and implement a CanExecute() method in your viewmodel.
Set CanExecute() to return false when the command starts to execute and back to true when the command is done.

This will disable the button for the duration of processing the command.

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1  
The meat of what you are saying: If the button is bound to a command, disable the command (CanExecute() = false) until the command is done processing. –  Josh G Mar 23 '11 at 13:59
    
@Josh G: yes indeed! –  StephaneT Mar 23 '11 at 19:18

I had the same issue and this worked for me:

<Button>
    <Button.InputBindings>
            <MouseBinding Gesture="LeftClick" Command="New" />
    </Button.InputBindings>
</Button>
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Wow. If this works, that would be fantastic. I'll have to try it sometime. –  Josh G Aug 25 '11 at 20:23

You'd think that it would be as simple as using a Command and making CanExecute() return false while the command is running. You would be wrong. Even if you raise CanExecuteChanged explicitly:

public class TestCommand : ICommand
{
    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        _CanExecute = false;
        OnCanExecuteChanged();
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        Console.WriteLine("Executed TestCommand.");
        _CanExecute = true;
        OnCanExecuteChanged();
    }

    private bool _CanExecute = true;

    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return _CanExecute;
    }

    private void OnCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        EventHandler h = CanExecuteChanged;
        if (h != null)
        {
            h(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;
}

I suspect that if this command had a reference to the window's Dispatcher, and used Invoke when it called OnCanExecuteChanged, it would work.

I can think of a couple of ways to solve this problem. One's JMarsch's approach: simply track when Execute is called, and bail out without doing anything if it was called in the last few hundred milliseconds.

A more robust way might be to have the Execute method start a BackgroundWorker to do the actual processing, have CanExecute return (!BackgroundWorker.IsBusy), and raise CanExecuteChanged in when the task is complete. The button should requery CanExecute() as soon as Execute() returns, which it'll do instantly.

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You could set a flag

bool boolClicked = false;
button_OnClick
{
    if(!boolClicked)
    {
        boolClicked = true;
        //do something
        boolClicked = false;
    }
}
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1  
I would add a Try{ boolClicked = true; DoSomething(); } Finally{ boolClicked = false;} to make sure to reset the flag. Cheers. –  SRO Dec 3 '13 at 11:53

If your control derives from System.Windows.Forms.Control, you can use the double click event.

If it doesn't derive from System.Windows.Forms.Control, then wire up mousedown instead and confirm the click count == 2 :

private void Button_MouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.ClickCount == 2)
    {
       //Do stuff
    }
 }
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This is a WPF control... It derives from System.Windows.Controls.Control –  Josh G May 8 '09 at 19:26
    
Then you can use this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Or have I missunderstood? –  Noel Kennedy May 8 '09 at 19:42
    
The goal was not to handle the double click event; my intention is to suppress it. –  Josh G Dec 16 '09 at 14:48

This checks if validation has passed and if it does then disables the button.

private void checkButtonDoubleClick(Button button)
    {
        System.Text.StringBuilder sbValid = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
        sbValid.Append("if (typeof(Page_ClientValidate) == 'function') { ");
        sbValid.Append("if (Page_ClientValidate() == false) { return false; }} ");
        sbValid.Append("this.value = 'Please wait...';");
        sbValid.Append("this.disabled = true;");
        sbValid.Append(this.Page.ClientScript.GetPostBackEventReference(button, ""));
        sbValid.Append(";");
        button.Attributes.Add("onclick", sbValid.ToString());
    }
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Wow. Not sure what's going on here, but looks like you are assuming ASP.NET or something. There is no Page, no ClientScript, and no post back. –  Josh G Dec 16 '09 at 14:50
    
Yes, wrong place to post this. This is for standard asp.net, not wpf. –  ta4ka Dec 31 '09 at 9:55

Simple & Effective for blocking double, triple, and quadruple clicks

<Button PreviewMouseDown="Button_PreviewMouseDown"/>

private void Button_PreviewMouseDown(object sender, MouseButtonEventArgs e)
{
    if (e.ClickCount >= 2)
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }
}
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