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Can I have multiple java SDK versions installed on my machine?

Java 1.4 Java 2 Java 6 Java 7

please advise as I have to develop solutions for Maximo in Java 1.4 and Java 2 Plus I want to learn development on Java 6 and 7

Thanks.

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>Java 1.4 and Java 2 Plus What do you mean with "Java 2 Plus"? From Java 1.2 to Java 1.5 (exclusive), Java is called Java 2 -> Java 1.4 is "Java 2 Plus"... –  Puce Dec 7 '11 at 11:26

5 Answers 5

Can I have multiple java SDK versions installed on my machine?

Yes

But make sure you use right path in your projects. It will be better to use some IDE like Eclipse. It will handle jdk path problems for you.


Java 1.4 is very old, try to shift to new one as soon as possible.

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+1: Java 5.0 is also very old and if you are learning a new version of Java I wouldn't bother with Java 6 either. Java 7 is likely to be the best choice unless you have to use an older version. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 7 '11 at 11:38

Yes, you can. Just use full path names when invoking javac, java, etc. or set your PATH environment variable to point to the appropriate jdk/bin location.

The IDEs usually allow defining multiple JDKs/JREs, and you can choose which one to use for every project.

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Yes,you can. You need change environment variable Normally JAVA_HOME variable. So you can use another variable. eg.

JAVA_HOME='/home/jdk1.8.0_45'
JAVA_7='/home/jdk1.7.0_60'
JAVA_6='/home/jdk1.6.0_34'

Add path variable

PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME/bin
PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_7/bin
PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_8/bin
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Yeah, you can install as many Java SDKs as you want. When you develop you just use the JDK you want to use.

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Yes you can. JDK is merely a directory somewhere on your disk. So you can easily download and unpack all the versions you want, and run java and javac from the directory you're currently interested in.

IDEs will do all the messy stuff for you: just let them know where the unpacked JDKs are, and choose a JDK in project's or module's settings.

PS. Java 1.4 is Java 2. Java 2 is actually an umbrella name for 1.2, 1.3, and 1.4

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Does the JDK...exe really just unzip and copy files to a folder? No registry entries, no nothing else? –  Danijel Sep 25 '13 at 15:32
    
It can set up registry entries for itself, but most of those are tagged with a specific version, and therefore do not affect each other. The system-wide settings are the version to be used by the Java plug-in, file associations, etc — nothing you would need for development or experiments. –  alf Oct 2 '13 at 14:48

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