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In ruby, given two date ranges, I want the range that represents the intersection of the two date ranges, or nil if no intersection. For example:

(Date.new(2011,1,1)..Date.new(2011,1,15)) & (Date.new(2011,1,10)..Date.new(2011,2,15))
=> Mon, 10 Jan 2011..Sat, 15 Jan 2011

Edit: Should have said that I want it to work for DateTime as well, so interval can be down to mins and secs:

(DateTime.new(2011,1,1,22,45)..Date.new(2011,2,15)) & (Date.new(2011,1,1)..Date.new(2011,2,15))
=> Sat, 01 Jan 2011 22:45:00 +0000..Tue, 15 Feb 2011
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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted
require 'date'

class Range
  def intersection(other)
    return nil if (self.max < other.begin or other.max < self.begin) 
    [self.begin, other.begin].max..[self.max, other.max].min
  end
  alias_method :&, :intersection
end

p (Date.new(2011,1,1)..Date.new(2011,1,15)) & (Date.new(2011,1,10)..Date.new(2011,2,15))
#<Date: 2011-01-10 ((2455572j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>..#<Date: 2011-01-15 ((2455577j,0s,0n),+0s,2299161j)>
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This one is great, but I've had to change range.end to range.max so that the exclusive range notation (...) still works. –  jjnevis Dec 7 '11 at 13:37
    
@jjnevis I didn't do that because I thought range.max would iterate, but it appears I was wrong. Then range.max is definitely better and I 'll edit the answer. –  steenslag Dec 7 '11 at 15:34
    
Would it be more consistent to use range.min rather than range.begin if we are using range.max? Anyway - this answer gets my tick! Thanks. –  jjnevis Dec 7 '11 at 16:49
    
This answer has a big flaw: it doesn't support Ranges that have their ends excluded. –  bert bruynooghe Mar 7 '13 at 13:19

You can try this to get a range representing intersection

range1 = Date.new(2011,12,1)..Date.new(2011,12,10)
range2 = Date.new(2011,12,4)..Date.new(2011,12,12)

inters = range1.to_a & range2.to_a

intersected_range = inters.min..inters.max

Converting your example:

class Range  
  def intersection(other)  
    raise ArgumentError, 'value must be a Range' unless other.kind_of?(Range)  

    inters = self.to_a & other.to_a

    inters.empty? ? nil : inters.min..inters.max 
  end  

  alias_method :&, :intersection  
end
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Keep in mind though that converting large Ranges to arrays can be very inefficient. –  Ajedi32 Aug 3 '12 at 20:27

I found this: http://www.postal-code.com/binarycode/2009/06/06/better-range-intersection-in-ruby/ which is a pretty good start, but does not work for dates. I've tweaked a bit into this:

class Range  
  def intersection(other)  
    raise ArgumentError, 'value must be a Range' unless other.kind_of?(Range)  

    new_min = self.cover?(other.min) ? other.min : other.cover?(min) ? min : nil  
    new_max = self.cover?(other.max) ? other.max : other.cover?(max) ? max : nil  

    new_min && new_max ? new_min..new_max : nil  
  end  

  alias_method :&, :intersection  
end

I've omitted the tests, but they are basically the tests from the post above changed for dates. This works for ruby 1.9.2.

Anyone got a better solution?

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Try something like this

require 'date'
sample = Date.parse('2011-01-01')
sample1 = Date.parse('2011-01-15')
sample2 = Date.parse('2010-12-19')
sample3 = Date.parse('2011-01-11')

puts (sample..sample1).to_a & (sample2..sample3).to_a

What this will give you is a array of intersection dates!!

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I baked this solution for ascending ranges, also taking care of the exclude end situations:

intersect_ranges = ->(r1, r2) do
  new_end = [r1.end, r2.end].min
  new_begin = [r1.begin, r2.begin].max
  exclude_end = (r2.exclude_end? && new_end == r2.end) || (r1.exclude_end? && new_end == r1.end)

  valid = (new_begin <= new_end && !exclude_end) 
  valid ||= (new_begin < new_end && exclude_end))
  valid ? Range.new(new_begin, new_end, exclude_end) : nil
end

I'm also a bit worried by you guys adding it to the Range class itself, since the behavior of intersecting ranges is not uniformly defined. (How about intersecting 1...4 and 4...1? Why nil when there is no intersection; we could also say this is an empty range: 1...1 )

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I'd transfer them into an array, since arrays know the intersection-operation:

(Date.new(2011,1,1)..Date.new(2011,1,15)).to_a & (Date.new(2011,1,10)..Date.new(2011,2,15)).to_a

Of course this returns an Array. So if you want an Enumerator (Range doesn't seem to be possible since these are not consecutive values anymore) just throw to_enum at the end.

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Sorry - should have said that I want it to work for DateTime too, so the interval could be down to mins and secs. I also want a range returned. –  jjnevis Dec 7 '11 at 11:40

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