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I was wondering if anyone could help me understand this particular aspect of OO PHP as it has caught me out a few times now.

I have specified a var at the top of my file like so

$route = explode('/', $_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"]);
// Shorthand
$r1=$route[0]; $r2=$route[1]; $r3=$route[2];

I am then tring to use $r1 etc inside a function written just below the above code.

function edit($id)
   {
            $_SESSION['path'] = $r1 . "/" . $r2 . "/" . $r3;
            require 'app/controller/edit.php';
            new Controller($id);
   }

The $r1,$r2, $r3 vars cannot be seen for some reason inside this function.

Notice: Undefined variable: r1 in C:\wamp\www\options.ex\public_html\app\options.php on line 77

If I were to pass the $r vars to the function, I'd image there would be no problem, but since they are declared globally I was wondering why they were not visible without doing this as their scope presumably is global?

Thanks.

EDIT - full code.

<?php

require_once 'load.php';


// Clean and prepare query string
$route = explode('/', $_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"]);
    // Trim outer exmpty parameters caused by leading/trailing slash
    if($route[count($route)-1]=='') unset($route[count($route)-1]);
    if($route[0]=='') unset($route[0]);
    $route = array_values($route);
    // If any parameters are undefined, set them to ''
    if(!isset($route[0])) { $route[0]=''; $route[1]=''; $route[2]='';  }
    elseif(!isset($route[1])) { $route[1]=''; $route[2]='';  }
    elseif(!isset($route[2])) { $route[2]='';  }
// Shorthand
$r1=$route[0]; $r2=$route[1]; $r3=$route[2];

// Choose route, else default to dash
if($r1=='dashboard' && $r2=='' && $r3=='')          dashboard();
elseif($r1=='staff' && $r2=='add' && $r3=='')       add_staff();
elseif($r1=='staff' && $r2=='edit' && $r3!='')      edit_staff($r3);

else header("location: http://local.options.ex/dashboard");



// Dashboard: Main entry point after login.
function dashboard()
   {
            require 'app/controller/dashboard/dashboard.php';
            new Controller();

   }

// Staff related interfaces ----------------------------------------------------
function add_staff()
   {
            require 'app/controller/staff/add_staff.php';
            new Controller();
   }

// ----------------------------------------
function edit_staff($staff_id)
   {
            $_SESSION['path'] = $r1 . "/" . $r2 . "/" . $r3;
            require 'app/controller/staff/edit_staff.php';
            new Controller($staff_id);
   }

// ----------------------------------------

Just to clear up, the $r* variables are not used again beyond here, hence the convenient use of storing in session.

share|improve this question
    
I don't see any global declaration on the $r1,$r2 and $r3. Something is missing? –  ajreal Dec 7 '11 at 11:39
1  
I removed the OOP tag, because this is not related to OOP. In fact, the code looks procedural to me. Your issue itself is about variable scope and sufficiently explained in the PHP Manual: php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php –  Gordon Dec 7 '11 at 11:42
    
possible duplicate of Trouble with variable scope in PHP –  Gordon Dec 7 '11 at 11:47
    
(related) stackoverflow.com/search?q=variable+scope+php –  Gordon Dec 7 '11 at 11:47

6 Answers 6

That's not OOP - in OOP you'd declare a class, make r1, r2 and r3 its properties, and then they would be available in every method of the class. See a little tutorial about classes here.

Using global variables is a bad idea.

EDIT

Here's a sample code, like Sohnee asked:

Class Route {
    var $r1;
    var $r2;
    var $r3;

    function __construct($url)
    {
        $route = explode('/', $url);
        // Shorthand
        $this->r1=$route[0]; $this->r2=$route[1]; $this->r3=$route[2];
    }

    function test()
    {
            $path = $this->r1 . "/" . $this->r2 . "/" . $this->r3;
            echo $path;
    }

}

$a = new Route('http://stackoverflow.com/questions/');
$a->test();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - code example would be nice too though! –  Steve Fenton Dec 7 '11 at 11:47
1  
Alright, code coming up! –  Shomz Dec 7 '11 at 11:52

In order to use global variables inside a function, you have to do it via the following way

$route = explode('/', $_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"]);
// Shorthand
$r1=$route[0]; $r2=$route[1]; $r3=$route[2];
// ...  
function edit($id)
{
    global $r1, $r2, $r3;  // after this the variables are available in function scope

}

Another option is to use global array $GLOBALS. Using this array a global variable can be accessed from any scope like this:

if ($GLOBALS["r1"] == "some value")
{ 
    // do something
}
share|improve this answer

ADD this inside the function.

global $r1, $r2, $r3;

This tells the function to use the variables from the global scope.

share|improve this answer

global variables can be seen inside a method using $GLOBALS

$GLOBALS — References all variables available in global scope

http://php.net/manual/en/reserved.variables.globals.php

<?php

$baz = 'foo';

clas Bar {

    public function __construct() {
        echo $GLOBALS['baz'];
    }
}

or inside a function declaring variables global

function bar() {
    global $baz;
    echo $baz
}
share|improve this answer

If $r1, $r2, and $r3 are defined outside any class or function definition, you can use the global keyword to access them, or directly call them from the $GLOBALS array. e.x.:

function edit($id){
  global $r1, $r2, $r3; //Rest of the function below this

or

$_SESSION['path'] = $GLOBALS['r1'].'/' //... etc.
share|improve this answer

Global variables can be accessed within functions, if you declare them as global (which creates a local reference to the global). However, globals are bad.

If the variable definition happens in "app/controller/edit.php", then the problem is as the warning tells you: the variables aren't defined yet. You use them on one line, but don't include the file that defines them until the next, so they aren't yet defined. It's the same as if the function were:

function edit($id) {
    $_SESSION['path'] = $r1 . "/" . $r2 . "/" . $r3;
    $route = explode('/', $_SERVER["REQUEST_URI"]);
    // Shorthand
    $r1=$route[0]; $r2=$route[1]; $r3=$route[2];
    ...
}

I recommend against the obvious fix: moving the require to before the line that uses the variables, as this shares one of the big problems with globals: the variables seemingly magically spring into existence, with no indication of how or where, making it harder to understand the function (and the rest of the code) simply by reading the function. It's a form of coupling.

Executing code by including files can occasionally be a useful trick, but it also often causes problems (as this question demonstrates). Generally, include files should only define things. For an OO approach, take whatever tasks are being performed by the included file and figure out what jobs the code is trying to achieve overall. Then, assign each task to the class that has the (single) responsibility of achieving each overall job. In this case, the specific task is breaking up a request into a route, and the overall job is dispatching a request to a controller. There should then be a dispatcher class that dispatches a request to the appropriate controller, with a method that parses the route. The method (which might be private or protected and called from the constructor) could store the route in instance variables for time-efficiency.

class RouteDispatcher {
    protected $route;

    function __construct() {
        $this->_parseRoute();
        ...
    }

    function dispatch() {
        ...
    }

    protected function _parseRoute() {
        $this->route = explode('/', $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI']);
    }

    ...
}

The entry point (the script that is first called to handle each request) would instantiate a RequestDispatcher, set any appropriate properties or call any necessary methods, then call RequestDispatcher::dispatch, which would create the appropriate controller and hand off control to its request handler.

In the general case, a good design can be trickier than this because your goal as a designer in creating classes that have a single responsibility is to cut down on the need to change them. If a class has only one responsibility, then the class will need to be changed only if the requirements for that responsibility change.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I was thinking i'd like to avoid Globals. It was really just a question of: can a function only access the variables that are passed to it and nothing outside? –  Larry B Dec 7 '11 at 11:43
    
@GHarping: what scope are the variables? The code sample is incomplete. Without that information, it's impossible to know what you're dealing with at. –  outis Dec 7 '11 at 11:48
    
Well, the route variables and their shorthands, r1 etc, only are required as far as whats written in the sample and no further - so up to the function. That why I'm keen not to declare them global, however there will be many differently named versions of the same function so I suppose, for the sake of my OCD, I'd rather not pass the variables everytime to each different function if that were possible? –  Larry B Dec 7 '11 at 11:54
    
@GHarping: that doesn't answer my question. Please edit your question, making the code sample complete and demonstrating the scope of the variables. As it stands, it's not possible to answer your question. –  outis Dec 7 '11 at 11:55
    
Thanks for your help. That essentially is it as far as the code is concerned for those variables. As you can see the funcitons load the controller classes which loads then model ... etc and so on and its gets rather convoluted from that point so editing the sample to contain all of that all may be overkill. As far as the variables listed though they end there... –  Larry B Dec 7 '11 at 12:02

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